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I have a ServerSocket in Java:

ServerSocket serverSocket = new ServerSocket(1000);

which accepts a clientSocket:

Socket clientSocket;
clientSocket = serverSocket.accept();

Up until now I was reading the input like this:

BufferedReader clientSocketInputStream = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(clientSocket.getInputStream()));
while ((inputLine = clientSocketInputStream.readLine()) != null){
    String message = inputLine;
    // Hack the computer connecting to this one after here

However if the text sent is something like

String stringToBeSent = "Hello\nHowareyou"; 

then I am in trouble. Because I need this text as it is. 2 different Strings do not help me.

How can I read it as it is?

Thanks.

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why don't you split("\n"); within the loop –  яша Dec 28 '13 at 10:55
    
"\n" never makes it into the loop @яша –  Koray Tugay Dec 28 '13 at 10:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Two options:

  • Put the multiple strings back together.

    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder()
    while ((inputLine = clientSocketInputStream.readLine()) != null)
    {
        String message = inputLine;
        sb.append(message);
        sb.append('\n');
    }
    String message = sb.toString();
    
  • Read an array of bytes instead of String, using a BufferedInputStream instead of a BufferedReader. Then smash the whole byte array into the String constructor with a valid charset. This will require you to know how many bytes the String will be.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately I have no change to know how long the String will be. –  Koray Tugay Dec 28 '13 at 10:56
    
You are not in control of what is coming through the socket? Well then pick option one. Use a StringBuilder to stitch the lines back together. –  Martijn Courteaux Dec 28 '13 at 10:57
    
@KorayTugay that seems legit to me, the fact is that you can't know what is going to come . –  яша Dec 28 '13 at 11:02

You could simply read character by character. http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/io/BufferedReader.html#read()

instead of read line.

share|improve this answer

BufferedReader reads characters until it gets "\n", "\r" or "\r\n". You can read character by character but it does not change anything anyway as how would you determine which new line characater shows the real new line?

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