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Let's say I want to do this:

os.path.join("THIS_DIR_DOESNT_EXIST", "NEITHER_DOES_THIS_SUBDIR")

This happens to work for me (python 2.7 on Mac OS), but is it guaranteed to always work, or is this platform-dependent?

In case you're wondering why in the world I want to do this, my use case is joining globs, so I can have a path glob that will work on both Mac & Windows

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The worst that can happen it'll throw an exception that you can catch. But I think it'll never do this - I've used it a lot to create paths to directories that I'd create later on. –  Aleksander Lidtke Dec 28 '13 at 11:49
    
The core libraries already have their own ways to throw exceptions for it. When you doubt of the outcome, you should just try-catch and you are always sure you can handle for whatever reason the os-library might fail to execute that action. When you distribute an app and get feedback that it went wrong you can eventually add new rules to your code based on that feedback. You can't be all-knowing at that point :) –  Allendar Dec 28 '13 at 11:51
    
Fair enough but in this particular use case I would rather just: separator = "/" if sys.platform == "darwin" else "\\" ; separator.join("FAKEDIR1", "FAKEDIR2") to be safe, if os.path.join is not meant to be used for this. Hence, why I am asking whether os.path.join is meant to be used for this. –  AlcubierreDrive Dec 28 '13 at 11:54
5  
you can look into the source code using the inspect module; inspect.getsource( os.path.join ) doesn't look like doing anything with the actual path on the filesystem –  behzad.nouri Dec 28 '13 at 11:54
3  
os.path.join should not make system calls. You should use it. –  Veedrac Dec 28 '13 at 11:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, it will work in the same way in all platforms.

In order to prove it, lets look up into the sources. Most of the os.path.join implementations do work with strings only, and don't address any FS functions.

For example, in Posix:

def join(a, *p):
    """Join two or more pathname components, inserting '/' as needed.
    If any component is an absolute path, all previous path components
    will be discarded."""
    path = a
    for b in p:
        if b.startswith('/'):
            path = b
        elif path == '' or path.endswith('/'):
            path +=  b
        else:
            path += '/' + b
    return path

The other platforms:

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It is very awesome that you found the links to these sources, thank you very much. But, I am wary to trust the current implementation without a comment or documentation to also prove its intent. Is there any documentation you can please cite to show that the use case I mention is intended? I.e., how do we know that whoever maintains the os module won't make it start checking if the path exists? Are we relying on the quirks of the current implementation, or the documented intent? –  AlcubierreDrive Dec 28 '13 at 12:04
    
I guess as long as we trust that the stated purpose of "join two or more pathname components" can never change, we are good, right? Can we trust this? –  AlcubierreDrive Dec 28 '13 at 12:05
2  
@AlcubierreDrive I think we can trust the current implementation, since if the functionality is amended with path check, it may affect many existing projects that rely on the current way of work. –  VisioN Dec 28 '13 at 12:10

Considering that os.path.join helps construct relative paths, and does not do any absolute or currentdir based checks, it should always be safe to use for concatenating path segments as string representation, regardless of if they point to something real on the file system or not.

If it were the case that the path must exist, then it would be useless for the use case of constructing paths to files and folders that are yet to be written.

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If it were the case that the path must exist, then it would be useless for the use case of constructing paths to files and folders that are yet to be written. Is there any documentation you can please cite to show that the use case you mention is intended? I.e., how do we know that whoever maintains the os module won't make it start checking if the path exists? Are we relying on the quirks of the current implementation, or the documented intent? –  AlcubierreDrive Dec 28 '13 at 12:01

Yes, because in truth all thats happening is string concatenation. If you wish to check the validity of a path, then use the os.path.exists function.

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