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I have this eventhandler, that can get executed multiple times. When I let it finish the execution, everything works fine (typing only one character and wait until the result is computed). But when I type normally, a deadlock occurs. At least I think it is a deadlock.

private async void tbInput_TextChanged(object sender, TextChangedEventArgs e)
{
    resultStackPanel.Children.Clear();
    List<Task<UIElement>> tasks = new List<Task<UIElement>>();
    if (tbInput.Text != "")
    {
        foreach (IModule mod in Modules)
        {
            if (mod.IsApplicable(tbInput.Text))
                tasks.Add(mod.CalculateOutcome(tbInput.Text));
        }
        while (tasks.Count > 0)
        {
            await Task.WhenAny(tasks);
            foreach (Task<UIElement> resultTask in tasks)
            {
                if (resultTask.Status == TaskStatus.RanToCompletion)
                {
                    if (resultTask.Result != null)
                    {
                        resultStackPanel.Children.Add(resultTask.Result);
                    }
                    tasks.Remove(resultTask);
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

I am pretty sure it is because of this line and that I should cancel all tasks, but I dont know how, since CancellationToken is useless because the libraries that perform the heavy work dont support it:

await Task.WhenAny(tasks);
share|improve this question
    
Why don't you simply use Task.WhenAll. if you want to process the results as soon as they are awailable you can attach a ContinueWith to each Task. –  L.B Dec 28 '13 at 15:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I can see a few problems with your code as-is. For one, you'll get an infinite loop if any task does not complete successfully. For another, your existing tasks will still run to completion and attempt to update your UI.

Since your libraries don't support CancellationToken, you can't actually cancel the operations (which is bad). But you can at least pretend to cancel them by allowing them to run to completion and then ignoring the result. You can use a technique I call asynchronous callback contexts for this.

It's easier to split logic like this off into another method, instead of using a continuation; something like this:

private object _callbackContext;
private async void tbInput_TextChanged(object sender, TextChangedEventArgs e)
{
  _callbackContext = new object();
  resultStackPanel.Children.Clear();
  if (tbInput.Text == "")
    return;
  Modules.Where(mod => mod.IsApplicable(tbInput.Text))
      .Select(mod => ApplyModuleAsync(mod));
}

private async Task ApplyModuleAsync(IModule module)
{
  var myContext = _callbackContext;
  var element = await module.CalculateOutcome(tbInput.Text);
  if (myContext != _callbackContext || element == null)
    return;
  resultStackPanel.Children.Add(element);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! This really clears up the code. But now I have the same problem in a different place. One module does a WebRequest and since it gets executed more than once, the execution gets stuck on WebResponse response = await request.GetResponseAsync(); –  Dominik Dec 28 '13 at 18:54
    
IIRC, a WebRequest can only do one request at a time. You'll need to create a new WebRequest instance for another request, or use the newer HttpClient. If that doesn't solve your problem, please post a separate question with code and exception/deadlock details. –  Stephen Cleary Dec 28 '13 at 19:58
    
To create a Request I use WebRequest.CreateHttp() every time the function is used, so that shouldn't be a problem. I'd gladly provide any exception/deadlock details, but unfortunately there are none. The code just doesn't get past the await request.GetResponseAsync(); operation. –  Dominik Dec 28 '13 at 20:16
    
I got it! I used the same instance of IModule for multiple executions of the eventhandler. It works now that the Modules Array is reinitialized with new IModules every time the eventhandler gets executed. I also know now that it had to do with the HttpWebRequest and nothing with the await call, but I still dont understand why. WebRequest.CreateHttp() does create a new instance of a HttpWebRequest, doesn't it? So how can this be an issue? –  Dominik Dec 28 '13 at 22:31
    
I'm not really understanding you; it's difficult to get a detailed description of code in the comments. Please post a new question if you have a question. –  Stephen Cleary Dec 28 '13 at 23:06

You can just add a continuation to the async method you're calling and then just asynchronously wait for all of them to complete with Task.WhenAll:

foreach (IModule mod in Modules)
{
    if (mod.IsApplicable(tbInput.Text))
    {
        tasks.Add(mod.CalculateOutcome(tbInput.Text).ContinueWith(resultTask =>
        {
             if (resultTask.Result != null)
             {
                 resultStackPanel.Children.Add(resultTask.Result);
             }
        }, TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnRanToCompletion));            
    }
}
await Task.WhenAll(tasks.ToArray());
share|improve this answer
    
I don't know why but when I do this nothing gets added to the resultStackPanel. At the end of the function resultStackPanel.Children.Count is 0. And unfortunately I cant use WhenAll, because I want to print results as soon as they are there. –  Dominik Dec 28 '13 at 16:38
    
If you don't need all the tasks, just the first one that finishes, you can use Task.WhenAny instead. –  I3arnon Dec 28 '13 at 16:41
    
The thing is, when I type something, like 'test' into the textbox, the handler gets executed 4 times, and I only need the results of the last run. I assume that the eventhandler can get executed multiple times at the same time, and I think this is causing problems with the await calls, because these calls are never finished. –  Dominik Dec 28 '13 at 16:49
    
If you need just the last run.. it means you need to wait for all the ones before it to complete as well. That means you need to wait for all of them. you could however have a delay that fires the event only if the user didn't type for some time (like 200 ms). But that is a new question in an new topic. –  I3arnon Dec 28 '13 at 16:57
    
the Timeout works, but what if I want to add a module that needs 1 second to compute the result? Then I would have to set the timeout to 1 second and then the responsibility of the program would be bad. Could it be that async/await just isn't suitable for this and I have to use real parallelism? –  Dominik Dec 28 '13 at 17:21

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