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How can I change the "geometry" of an array from one to two dimensions (from linear array to squared matrix)?

In my code I have a function returning data, defined as:

unsigned long *data = malloc(sizeof(unsigned long) * 9);

The function receiving data is using that pointer as an argument for a call to another function:

sumOfColTwo(data);

But I would like that function to access the array as if it were a 3x3 matrix. For example, to compute the total of a column I would like to be able to do:

void sumOfColTwo(<some-declaration-here>) {
    for (i=0; i<3; i++)
        sum += data[1][i]
}

In other words, given a linear array:

A B C D E F G H I

I would like to "logically" access it in either of these two forms:

A B C          A D G
D E F    or    B E H
G H I          C F I

[I am using ANSI C (C89)]

EDIT

As per request in the comments, here's how I generate the original data:

unsigned long *load_input(void) {

    unsigned long *data = malloc(sizeof(unsigned long) * 9);

    unsigned char i, parsed;
    for (i=0; i<9; i++) {
        parsed = scanf("%lu", &data[i]);
    }

    /* Return the appropriate value (eventually freeing unused memory) */
    if (parsed == 1) {
        return data;
    } else {
        free(data);
        return NULL;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Honestly I don't see any neat solution with out wrapping this in some Object Oriented stuff, that would work in general case i.e. matrices of different matrices, or fast "logical" transpose. Do you need general case, or just 3x3 and fixed set of operations? –  luk32 Dec 28 '13 at 15:44
    
Does your 'ANSI C' mean 'C11' or 'C89'? There is an ANSI standard for ISO/IEC 9899:2011, the current C standard, but often ANSI C refers to C89, the ANSI standard which pre-dated the first ISO standard (but was substantively the same, except that the 'chapter' numbers were different). –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 28 '13 at 15:52
    
Please see my answer for a generic C89 solution. –  alk Dec 28 '13 at 16:03
    
@luk32 - I'm just trying to learn the language solving some random problems... My goal - rather than solving this specific case - is to understand the "philosophy" of casting the geometry of arrays. A well-commented example on this specific case might suffice, I guess. :) –  mac Dec 28 '13 at 16:03
    
@JonathanLeffler - C89 –  mac Dec 28 '13 at 16:04

4 Answers 4

Although I feel it is not "changing" the geometry but "re-interpreting" it, however following some approaches.

Do it like this:

void print1dAs2d(unsigned long * _data) 
{
  unsigned long (*data)[3][3] = (unsigned long (*)[3][3]) _data; /* Hide away the dirty cast. */

  for (size_t i = 0; i < 3; ++i)
  {
    for (size_t j = 0; j < 3; ++j)
    {
      printf("%lu ", (*data)[i][j]);
    }

    printf("\n");
  }
}

Than call it like so:

int main(void)
{
  unsigned long data[9] = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9};

  print1daAs2d(data);

  return 0;
}

And to have this generic (assuming at least C99) for a NxM matrix do like this:

void print1dAs2d_NxM(size_t n, size_t m, unsigned long * _data) 
{
  unsigned long (*data)[n][m] = (unsigned long (*)[n][m]) _data; /* Hide away the dirty cast. */

  for (size_t i = 0; i < n; ++i)
  {
    for (size_t j = 0; j < m; ++j)
    {
      printf("%lu ", (*data)[i][j]);
    }

    printf("\n");
  }
}

And for C89 the classical approach using pure pointer arithmetics:

void print1dAs2d_NxM(size_t n, size_t m, unsigned long * data) 
{
  for (size_t i = 0; i < n; ++i)
  {
    for (size_t j = 0; j < m; ++j)
    {
      printf("%lu ", *(data + i*m + j);
    }

    printf("\n");
  }
}

This last, old-fashioned-C89-compatible approach gets along without any cast ... - interesting enough though. ;-)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the answer, but this does not seem to work. First, I get compilation warning about "incompatible pointer type", for a second, if I run the program the numbers are all wrong... :( –  mac Dec 28 '13 at 15:50
    
@mac: Please see my updated answer. –  alk Dec 28 '13 at 15:53
    
Wow... you are doing so many edits that it's difficult to keep up! ;) Your solution now properly works for me, but could you please elaborate a bit on the casting you "hid away"? It also seems to me that data is generated on the stack, rather than in the heap, so I could not modify in place the array with the matrix syntax... or am I misunderstanding the "casting"? –  mac Dec 28 '13 at 16:19
1  
@mac: In each of my examples data/_data are pointers, which indeed are created on the stack, but reference the data managed by the function's caller. As per "hiding the casting" I just redirected the task of casting to inside the "re-interpreting" function itself. As per your copmment you noticed that for the first version of my answer that the compiler proclaimed about an "incompatible" pointer type", which would have brought the need to the user to cast when calling the function. This latter is gone now, as hidden inside the function by "the dirty cast". –  alk Dec 28 '13 at 16:26

Given x number of rows and y number of columns and assuming an offset of zero (for both row and column has the first index as zero), then to compute the row order offset (the left matrix from your question) is :

row_order offset = <row index> * x + <column index>

The computation to do it by columns order (the right matrix in your question) would be:

column order offset = <column index> * y + <row index> 

where <row index> is the index into the row you want to access and
      <column index> is the column you want to access. 

You can then access the data by either pointer ( *(data + offset) ) or by index (data[offset]).

share|improve this answer
    
Of course Glenn... but how does this answer my question about changing the geometry of an array? –  mac Dec 28 '13 at 16:06
    
I'm not sure if I understand what you mean by geometry. If it is how the data is stored in memory linearly, then with row order you would have A B C D E F G H I J. For storage in column order, it would be A D H B E I C G J. I found this link to the different matrix ordering fgiesen.wordpress.com/2012/02/12/…. Hopefully it is the information about which you are inquiring. –  Glenn Dec 28 '13 at 16:18
    
Thank you Glenn for the link. As somebody else pointed out, "re-interpreting the geometry" would probably be a better way of phrasing what I meant... Essentially I was looking for a way to access an array conceptually generated as array[] with the array[][] syntax (see other answers for examples) –  mac Dec 28 '13 at 16:58
    
You are very welcome. –  Glenn Dec 28 '13 at 19:53

If you want to access a 9-value array as either:

A B C          A D G
D E F    or    B E H
G H I          C F I

then you are reduced to calculating the array subscripts yourself. This is C89 code that'll do the job. It is hard-coded to a 3x3 matrix because that was the example given. It's not dreadfully hard to generalize to a NxM matrix.

#include <stdio.h>

static void sum_by_rows(int data[9])
{
    int i, j;
    for (i = 0; i < 3; i++)
    {
        int sum = 0;
        for (j = 0; j < 3; j++)
            sum += data[i*3+j];
        printf("Sum row %d = %d\n", i, sum);
    }
}

static void sum_by_cols(int data[9])
{
    int i, j;
    for (i = 0; i < 3; i++)
    {
        int sum = 0;
        for (j = 0; j < 3; j++)
            sum += data[j*3+i];
        printf("Sum col %d = %d\n", i, sum);
    }
}

int main(void)
{
    int data[] = { 'A', 'B', 'C', 'D', 'E', 'F', 'G', 'H', 'I' };
    int i, j;

    printf("By rows\n");
    for (i = 0; i < 3; i++)
    {
        for (j = 0; j < 3; j++)
            printf("A[%d][%d] = %c (%d)\n", i, j, data[i*3+j], data[i*3+j]);
    }

    printf("By cols\n");
    for (i = 0; i < 3; i++)
    {
        for (j = 0; j < 3; j++)
            printf("A[%d][%d] = %c (%d)\n", i, j, data[j*3+i], data[j*3+i]);
    }

    sum_by_cols(data);
    sum_by_rows(data);
    return 0;
}

Output:

By rows
A[0][0] = A (65)
A[0][1] = B (66)
A[0][2] = C (67)
A[1][0] = D (68)
A[1][1] = E (69)
A[1][2] = F (70)
A[2][0] = G (71)
A[2][1] = H (72)
A[2][2] = I (73)
By cols
A[0][0] = A (65)
A[0][1] = D (68)
A[0][2] = G (71)
A[1][0] = B (66)
A[1][1] = E (69)
A[1][2] = H (72)
A[2][0] = C (67)
A[2][1] = F (70)
A[2][2] = I (73)
Sum col 0 = 204
Sum col 1 = 207
Sum col 2 = 210
Sum row 0 = 198
Sum row 1 = 207
Sum row 2 = 216

A more general case using a 3x4 array:

#include <stdio.h>

enum { N_ROWS = 3, N_COLS = 4 };

static void sum_by_rows(int data[N_ROWS * N_COLS])
{
    int i, j;
    for (i = 0; i < N_ROWS; i++)
    {
        int sum = 0;
        for (j = 0; j < N_COLS; j++)
            sum += data[i*N_COLS+j];
        printf("Sum row %d = %d\n", i, sum);
    }
}

static void sum_by_cols(int data[N_ROWS * N_COLS])
{
    int i, j;
    for (i = 0; i < N_COLS; i++)
    {
        int sum = 0;
        for (j = 0; j < N_ROWS; j++)
            sum += data[i*N_ROWS+j];
        printf("Sum col %d = %d\n", i, sum);
    }
}

int main(void)
{
    int data[N_ROWS * N_COLS];
    int i, j;

    for (i = 0; i < N_ROWS * N_COLS; i++)
        data[i] = 'A' + i;

    printf("By rows\n");
    for (i = 0; i < N_ROWS; i++)
    {
        for (j = 0; j < N_COLS; j++)
            printf(" %c", data[i*N_COLS+j]);
        putchar('\n');
    }

    printf("By cols\n");
    for (i = 0; i < N_COLS; i++)
    {
        for (j = 0; j < N_ROWS; j++)
            printf(" %c", data[j*N_ROWS+i]);
        putchar('\n');
    }

    sum_by_cols(data);
    sum_by_rows(data);
    return 0;
}

Output:

By rows
 A B C D
 E F G H
 I J K L
By cols
 A D G
 B E H
 C F I
 D G J
Sum col 0 = 198
Sum col 1 = 207
Sum col 2 = 216
Sum col 3 = 225
Sum row 0 = 266
Sum row 1 = 282
Sum row 2 = 298

I note that having to use the archaic C89 standard hobbles you. You can do many more interesting array manipulations if you can use C99 and VLAs — variable length arrays.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Jonathan for this, however my question is really about changing the geometry of an array, not about computing the sum of the colums, that was an example to illustrate the matrix[a][b] syntax. :) –  mac Dec 28 '13 at 16:10
1  
What do you mean by 'change the geometry', then? You can change the way you treat an array as shown. You can brute-force cast pointers, but to get the ABCDEFGHI and ADGBEHCFI interpretations out of a single vector of data, you have to either copy the data into a new array with the new geometry or handle it with subscripts. Or you have to use C99 and VLAs — variable length arrays. But you explicitly ruled out C99, so that isn't an option. You can do lots of fun things in C99 that you can't do in C89. It is a pity you are hobbled by having to use standard that's almost a quarter century old. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 28 '13 at 16:22
    
Jonathan, your comment is enlightening and gets right to the meat of what I wanted to know, thanks! For the records: I am using C89 since I am just learning the language, and I test my code by using the UVA judges, which requires C89 code... I am actually learning C just as a stepping stone to C++11, rest assured! :) –  mac Dec 28 '13 at 16:26
    
Try not to use too many bad habits you picked up while learning C when you code in C++11. The C++11 language is a very, very different creature from C (either C89 or C11). Most of what is good style in C is bad coding practice in C++11. Forget any library functions you learned in C when you code in C++11. I am not remotely comfortable in C++11. I code in the C++98 subset of C, so most of my programs will compile with a C++ compiler but they're C programs compiled by a C++ compiler, not C++ programs. There's a major distinction. It is worth learning to program before tackling C++11, though. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 28 '13 at 16:31
    
Thank you for the advice. I earn a living by programming (Python, mostly), so I am looking forward to switch to C++, as OOP is more in line with my way of structuring complex tasks. The reason why I chose to go the C -> C++ way, is two-folded: first because the learning resources I found for C++ has knowledge of C as a prerequisite, secondly, because I occasionally works with AVR microcontrollers, so C will be useful "per se", although at a hobby level. Thank you agin though for the input! :) –  mac Dec 28 '13 at 16:55

sample

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

unsigned long sumOfColTwo(unsigned long *data){
    unsigned long sum = 0;
    unsigned long (*datap)[3] = (unsigned long (*)[3])data;
    int i;
/*
    for (i=0; i<3; i++)
        sum += datap[i][1];
*/
    for (i=0; i<3; i++){
        printf("%d %lu \n", i, datap[i][1]);
        sum += datap[i][1];
    }
    return sum;
}

int main(){
    unsigned long *data = malloc(sizeof(unsigned long) * 9);
    int i;
    for(i = 0 ; i < 9 ; ++i)
        data[i] = i;
    printf("%lu\n", sumOfColTwo(data));
    free(data);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is odd... your code as it is (but for making ANSI-compatible, by moving the loop variable declaration out of the for) works. However if I insert printf("%d %lu \n", i, datap[i][1]); just before the sum update, the program stop working, the total being 0. ??? I am using gcc version 4.8.2... –  mac Dec 28 '13 at 15:59
    
@mac if I insert printf("%d %lu \n", i, datap[i][1]); it inserted, no problem. –  BLUEPIXY Dec 28 '13 at 16:04
    
For good measure I retested it, yet: still the same problem. The sum is 0 if I add said line. My Makefile is set with the following: CFLAGS=-lm -lcrypt -O2 -pipe -ansi –  mac Dec 28 '13 at 16:11
    
...and for extra super-dooper check: I tried to clang <filename>, but the 0 error persists... –  mac Dec 28 '13 at 16:13
    
@mac The sum is 0 if I add said line. Have failed to something maybe (E.g make) –  BLUEPIXY Dec 28 '13 at 16:18

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