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I have a function that uses an int, say 2488, to store temperature values. I have to call a function getTemp() to get the int. The getTemp function returns a double and uses the int to return the correct number. All the getTemp() does is return (double)x / 100.0 where x is 2488 in this case.

The returned double is then 24.88. This value then is sent to another function that adds the double to an array. Function is called DAaddDouble(double m, int x, int y) where m is the value to add, x and y is the coordinates that specify where to add the double.

Problem is, it turns into nan.

double a = getTemp();
//a is correct, i.e. 24.88
DAaddDouble(a, x, y);
/*-----------inside DAaddDouble----------*/
void DAaddDouble(double m, int x, int y)
{
   //at this point, a (or m, same) is 0.nan
   cord = x + y*40; //where to put the double
   snprintf(DARRAY[cord], 5, "%f",m);
   printf(....DARRAY[cord]...);

}

output: -nan

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How you defined DARRAY? Change DAaddDouble function to void DAaddDouble(double m, int x, int y) as a or m is 24.88 –  unohu Dec 28 '13 at 17:16
    
I'm sorry, it was a typo, it is double but the problem still remains. –  Solrik Dec 28 '13 at 18:00
1  
How you defined DARRAY? –  unohu Dec 28 '13 at 19:03
    
Your problem is unlikely to be in the fragment you quoted. Try stepping through the lines in a debugger to see when exactly m becomes NaN, if ever. –  Alexei Averchenko Dec 29 '13 at 2:17

3 Answers 3

The signature of function DAaddDouble is:

void DAaddDouble(int m, int x, int y)

Note that m is of type int, and inside the function, you have:

snprintf(DARRAY[cord], 5, "%f",m);

in which %f expects type double, it's undefined behavior.

Probably what you need is to have the parameter m as double(as in your words above the code).

void DAaddDouble(double m, int x, int y)
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I'm sorry, it was a typo, it is double but the problem still remains. –  Solrik Dec 28 '13 at 18:00

Mis-match prototype.

Usage of DAaddDouble() is not preceded by its declaration/definition, thus the compiler assumes the function is:

int DAaddDouble(int m, int x, int y);

Precede the usage of DAaddDouble() by the function definition or a function prototype.

void DAaddDouble(double m, int x, int y);

A good compiler will warn of this. Insure all warning are enabled.

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How do you know m is NAN. If you have infered by the value "printed" to DARRAY[cord], take into account that the format string should be "%lf" and not "%f".

void DAaddDouble(double m, int x, int y)
{
   //at this point, a (or m, same) is 0.nan
   cord = x + y*40; //where to put the double
   snprintf(DARRAY[cord], 5, "%f",m); /* should be "%lf" for printing doubles */
   printf(....DARRAY[cord]...);

}
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1  
format string should be "%lf" and not "%f" is not correct. Either will work. It makes a functional difference with scanf(), but not printf() "l (ell) ... has no effect on a following a, A, e, E, f, F, g, or G conversion" C11dr §7.21.6.1 7. m as a float or double is converted/passed to snprintf() as a double. specifier. –  chux Dec 29 '13 at 2:36

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