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I have written a javascript library, and I want to make it usable as a node module


Here is how I organized my library into a single javascript file:

(function (undefined) {

  ...various internal functions

  var HtmlAssert = function (html) {
    ...do the initialization of my main Class, giving a parameter to it
  }

  var it = function (title, currentTest) {
    ...execute the logic of my API

  }

  ...uses the class prototype to add various internal functions to the class

  module.exports.it = it;
  module.exports.HtmlAssert = HtmlAssert;

}).call(this);


And now this is how I use it:

var htmlassert = require('../node_modules/htmlassert.js');  // gets my module

var html = .... // parameter
var h = new htmlassert.HtmlAssert(html);  // call the constructor of the class with the parameter

htmlassert.it("is a first test", function () {      // call the logic of my API for some parameter param_1
   return h.method1().method2().method3();
});

htmlassert.it("is a second test", function () {     // call the logic of my API for some parameter param_2
   return h.method1().method3();
});


The best syntax I would imagine would be more something like:

var htmlassert = require('../node_modules/htmlassert.js');  // gets my module

var html = .... // parameter
var h = htmlassert(html);  // call the constructor of the class with the parameter
htmlassert.it("is a first test", h.method1().method2().method3());
htmlassert.it("is a second test", h.method1().method3());


but I'm not sure it this is possible, and how to achieve this?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by WiredPrairie, Tanner, user113215, Riccardo, newfurniturey Feb 28 at 14:25

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
You might want to look into similar assertion packages, and see how they structure their code: Chai, Should.js and Mocha. +1 for trying to give something back :) –  verybadalloc Dec 28 '13 at 18:01
    
I changed a bit my 'best syntax' idea because I realize it needs to be applied on the object once it has been instantiated, while the 'it' function is a generic method –  Aurelien Dec 28 '13 at 18:08

1 Answer 1

I finally manage to wrap up my library as a Node module https://npmjs.org/package/htmlassert.js

Here are the steps I followed:

Like I indicated, I used the javascript module pattern, so I added:

(function () {

    .... all the code of my library, the main class is : HtmlAssert

    var HtmlAssert = function () {
        // I added a property in order to be able to construct a fluent API,
        // with the word 'contains', e.g. : htmlToTest.contains.div().p()
        Object.defineProperty(this, 'contains', {
            get: function() {
                return this;
            }
        });

        // I added a function named 'containing' in order to pass 
        // the initial parameters
        this.containing = function (html) {
            if (typeof html === "undefined") {
                throw "You need to give as parameter the html that is going to be tested";
            }
            this.html = createDom(html);
            return this;
        };

        // I added a function named 'that' for my fluent interface when calling the
        //   actual logic
        this.that = function (title, htmlToTest) {
            var found = findTags(htmlToTest.html, htmlToTest, 0);
            if (found !== true) {
                var msg = 'Error when it \'' + title + '\'. Tag not found:' + htmlToTest.assertionError;
                throw new Error(msg);
            }
            return true;
        };
    ...other things to do in my constructor class
    }

    // This is the way I call the constructor, again for a fluent interface, 
    // see that I export this method
    HtmlAssert.getInstance = function(){
      return new HtmlAssert();
    };

    module.exports = HtmlAssert.getInstance();

})();

Please note that I used CasperJS to test this module, because I needed to test the module server side, and still have access to the window.document object which was available onlyy in a browser. I described this more in details on my blog: http://jsoftbiz.wordpress.com/2013/12/30/javascript-api-testing/

And finally, my fluent API looks like this:

var htmlassert = require("htmlassert.js");

var html = "<p><div class=\"someclass\" id=\"someid\"></div></p>";

var htmlToTest = htmlassert.containing(html);
htmlassert.that("it tests some basic HTML", 
             htmlToTest.contains.p().div("id", "someid", "class", "someclass")
           );

As you see, my htmlassert object has the 'containing' function that I can use to setup my parameter. then it also has the 'that' method that does the logic on this parameter. The reason why I did that in two steps is because then I can call several times the business logic with various values on the same html parameter.

the part of the business logic method : htmlToTest.contains.p().div("id", "someid", "class", "someclass") is where you see that how in practice the 'contains' property allows me to have a fluent interface

If you want to see the whole code, you can get it there: https://github.com/aurbroszniowski/HtmlAssertjs

Hope it helps!

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