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We have a string:

var dynamicString = "This isn't so dynamic, but it will be in real life.";

User types in some input:

var userInput = "REAL";

I want to match on this input, and wrap it with a span to highlight it:

var result = " ... but it will be in <span class='highlight'>real</span> life.";

So I use some RegExp magic to do that:

// Escapes user input,
var searchString = userInput.replace(/[\-\[\]\/\{\}\(\)\*\+\?\.\\\^\$\|]/g, "\\$&");

// Now we make a regex that matches *all* instances 
// and (most important point) is case-insensitive.
var searchRegex = new RegExp(searchString , 'ig');

// Now we highlight the matches on the dynamic string:
dynamicString = dynamicString.replace(reg, '<span class="highlight">' + userInput + '</span>');

This is all great, except here is the result:

console.log(dynamicString);
// -> " ... but it will be in <span class='highlight'>REAL</span> life.";

I replaced the content with the user's input, which means the text now gets the user's dirty case-insensitivity.

How do I wrap all matches with the span shown above, while maintaining the original value of the matches?

Figured out, the ideal result would be:

// user inputs 'REAL',

// We get:
console.log(dynamicString);
// -> " ... but it will be in <span class='highlight'>real</span> life.";
share|improve this question
    
Have you tried userInput.toLowerCase()... –  Örvar Dec 28 '13 at 21:31
    
Wouldn't work, because if the user searched 1366 Mulberry Lane, the matching result will then show all lowercase, when it should be Proper Cased. –  dc2 Dec 28 '13 at 21:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You'd use regex capturing groups and backreferences to capture the match and insert it in the string

var searchRegex = new RegExp('('+userInput+')' , 'ig');
dynamicString = dynamicString.replace(searchRegex, '<span class="highlight">$1</span>');

FIDDLE

share|improve this answer
    
It may be preferable to escape certain characters which have meaning in RegExp or HTML, e.g. <>[]?^$ –  Paul S. Dec 28 '13 at 21:34
    
Wow. 8 years of web development and somehow I have never, ever heard of backreferences or seen their use. +100. –  dc2 Dec 28 '13 at 21:37
    
@Paul S., If you look at my code above, you'll see I already do that. –  dc2 Dec 28 '13 at 21:38
    
@PaulS. - there's an escaping replace() on the user input in the OP's code, so I figured that was already taken care of. –  adeneo Dec 28 '13 at 21:38
    
@dc2 - now you know how they work, and it can be really useful sometimes –  adeneo Dec 28 '13 at 21:39

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