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I have the following nested loop. But it is inefficient time wise. So using a generator would be much better. Do you know how to do that?

x_sph[:] = [r*sin_t*cos_p for cos_p in cos_phi for sin_t in sin_theta for r in p]     

It seems like some of you are of the opinion (looking at comments) that using a generator was not helpful in this case. I am under the impression that using generators will avoid assigning variables to memory, and thus save memory and time. Am I wrong?

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7  
A generator is different but it won't be faster. –  Simeon Visser Dec 28 '13 at 23:29
1  
What makes you think a generator would be faster? It is not a magic bullet, only a means of avoiding having to materialize the whole result in memory. Since you are producing a list anyway, a generator will not offer any benefits and you'll just pay the overhead price for a generator. –  Martijn Pieters Dec 28 '13 at 23:39
1  
I wonder if this is a salvageable question. Maybe the original asker could be told why it's downvoted? –  Aaron Hall Dec 29 '13 at 3:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Judging from your code snippet you want to do something numerical and you want to do it fast. A generator won't help much in this respect. But using the numpy module will. Do it like so:

import numpy
# Change your p into an array, you'll see why.
r = numpy.array(p) # If p is a list this will change it into 1 dimensional vector.
sin_theta = numpy.array(sin_theta) # Same with the rest.
cos_phi = numpy.array(cos_phi)

x_sph = r.dot(sin_theta).dot(cos_theta)

In fact I'd use numpy even earlier, by doing:

phi = numpy.array(phi) # I don't know how you calculate this but you can start here with a phi list.
theta = numpy.array(theta)

sin_theta  =numpy.sin(theta)
cos_phi = numpy.array(phi)

You could even skip the intermediate sin_theta and cos_phi assignments and just put all the stuff in one line. It'll be long and complicated so I'll omit it but I do numpy-maths like that sometimes.

And numpy is fast, it'll make a huge difference. At least a noticeable one.

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This simplifies things. Thanks! –  Abhinav Kumar Dec 29 '13 at 0:50
    
You're welcome :) If this answer solves your problem accept it please. –  Aleksander Lidtke Dec 29 '13 at 9:49

[...] creates a list and (...) a generator :

generator = (r*sin_t*cos_p for cos_p in cos_phi for sin_t in sin_theta for r in p)
for value in generator:
    # Do something
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Your code still uses loops. My data is huge and using loops is inefficient. I am looking for a faster way. Thank anyways! –  Abhinav Kumar Dec 29 '13 at 0:50
    
Using generators won't magically make your code faster. You need to understand the basic principles behind it. A generator by itself won't do anything, as you need to iterate over it to get the values. The main advantage is that the processing time distribution is different (you don't compute all the values at once, but on a as-needed basis) –  swordofpain Dec 29 '13 at 9:10

To turn a loop into a generator, you can make it a function and yield:

def x_sph(p, cos_phi, sin_theta):
    for r in p:
        for sin_t in sin_theta:
            for cos_p in cos_phi:
                yield r * sin_t * cos_p

However, note that the advantages of generators are generally only realised if you don't need to calculate all values and can break at some point, or if you don't want to store all the values (the latter is a space rather than time advantage). If you end up calling this:

lst = list(x_sph(p, cos_phi, sin_theta))

then you won't see any gain.

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Your code still uses loops. My data is huge and using loops is inefficient. I am looking for a faster way. Thank anyways! –  Abhinav Kumar Dec 29 '13 at 0:44
    
@jonrsharpe is right, based on your materialization of the list. –  Aaron Hall Dec 29 '13 at 3:17
    
There is nothing inefficient about loops per se; numpy may be faster, but it's still looping somewhere in the background. –  jonrsharpe Dec 29 '13 at 10:13

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