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When I use square brackets with a % wildcard as below MySQL does not select any records starting with a number. Many examples across the internet state this as the correct use. Any suggestions? It doesn't work for a letter (a-d) range either. I'm running MySQL 3.2

SELECT * FROM customers WHERE lname LIKE '[0-9]%' ORDER BY lname ASC

or

SELECT * FROM customers WHERE lname LIKE '[a-d]%' ORDER BY lname ASC
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Where did you see MySQL examples using that syntax? I don't believe it is supported and isn't mentioned in the LIKE docs. A similar thing is supported by MSSQL... –  Michael Berkowski Dec 29 '13 at 0:30
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MySQL does support REGEXP/RLIKE which can be used to achieve what you want. –  Michael Berkowski Dec 29 '13 at 0:31
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The SQL standard only defines two wildcards for the LIKE operator: % for multiple characters and _ for a single character. Everything else is non-standard and specific to one DBMS. MySQL's LIKE operator does not support any non-standard extensions as far as I know. And besides: MySQL 3.2 is definitely outdated. You should really upgrade to a DBMS from this millennium. –  a_horse_with_no_name Dec 29 '13 at 0:37

2 Answers 2

I think in Mysql you can do something like this

SELECT * FROM customers WHERE lname REGEXP '^[a-d]'

MySql Fiddle

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Although I do not believe MySQL supports regular-expression-like character classes in [] with a regular LIKE clause (nor can I find relevant documentation), MySQL does have a REGEXP/RLIKE operator with which you can construct a regular expression for comparable functionality.

SELECT * FROM customers WHERE lname REGEXP '^[0-9]' ORDER BY lname ASC
SELECT * FROM customers WHERE lname REGEXP '^[a-d]' ORDER BY lname ASC

To build a regular expression similar to the wildcard patterns you used, start with ^ to left-anchor the pattern, and use the same character class [0-9], [a-f] as you proposed. You do not need to follow it by anything, because the % wildcard would be equivalent to a match of any zero or more characters following the initial left-anchored letter or number matched by ^[].

Of course, you can combine those statements with a logical OR, or build a regular expression which matches either case.

SELECT * FROM customers WHERE lname REGEXP '^[a-d]|[0-9]' ORDER BY lname ASC

Here's a demonstration.

One thing to keep in mind however: MySQL will not be able to use any index you may have on lname when using REGEXP.

n.b. I believe MS SQL Server supports a syntax similar to what you proposed.

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