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class Bird :

    '''A base class to define bird properties.'''

    count = 0
    def_init_( self , chat ) 
    self.sound = chat
    Bird.count += 1
    def talk( self ) :
    return self.sound

NameError: name 'def_init_' is not defined

I tried using 2 underscores on both side of the 'init'

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def_init_ is not a function or variable. Fix it (however is appropriate). –  user2864740 Dec 29 '13 at 7:20

3 Answers 3

This looks like a simple typo. You're missing the space after def - it should be:

def __init__(self, chat):
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And missing the : and indent .. –  user2864740 Dec 29 '13 at 7:20
1  
Yeah, the indentation is pretty badly wrong in the above code. I'm never sure how much of that is real and how much is copy/paste error, though. –  Peter DeGlopper Dec 29 '13 at 7:21

you had lots of error in your script actually 1> indentation 2> give space after def 3> colon after def init( self , chat ) follow the rules then everything will be okay....

class Bird :

    '''A base class to define bird properties.'''

    count = 0
    def __init__( self , chat ): 
        self.sound = chat
        Bird.count += 1

    def talk( self ):
        return self.sound
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You need to change your _init_ function to def __init__(self, chat):.

The __ is called a dunder, which is short for 'double underscore'. We usually use this, magic methods like instantiation. So for example, [] would be called __get__.

Whenever you see a dunder, you know it has a special use.

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