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I have an XML sample that looks like:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<root>
    <location id="1">
        <address>1600 Pennsylvania Avenue</address>
        <address>211B Baker Street</address>
    </location>
    <location id="1">
        <address>17 Cherry Tree Lane</address>
    </location>
    <location id="2">
        <address>350 5th Avenue</address>
    </location>
</root>

And I'd like to generate output that looks like:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<result>
    <location id="1">
        <address addressId="1">1600 Pennsylvania Avenue</address>
        <address addressId="2">211B Baker Street</address>
    </location>
    <location id="1">
        <address addressId="3">17 Cherry Tree Lane</address>
    </location>
    <location id="2">
        <address addressId="1">350 5th Avenue</address>
    </location>
</result>

Such that the addressId reflects the sequence of address across all location instances with the same id attribute.

I was thinking <xsl:number> would be my answer, but my attempts have failed:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<xsl:stylesheet 
    version="1.0"
    xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">

    <xsl:output method="xml" version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" indent="yes"/>

    <xsl:template match="/root">
        <result>
            <xsl:for-each select="location">
                <location>
                    <xsl:attribute name="id">
                        <xsl:value-of select="@id" />
                    </xsl:attribute>

                    <xsl:for-each select="address">
                        <address>
                            <xsl:attribute name="addressId">
                                <xsl:number count="//location[@id = ../@id]/address" level="any" />
                            </xsl:attribute>

                            <!--                            
                              The rest are just my debugging attempts; 
                                curiously addressId3 and addressId4 return
                                different values?
                              -->

                            <!--
                            <xsl:attribute name="addressId2">
                                <xsl:number count="//location[@id = parent::location/@id]/address" level="any" />
                            </xsl:attribute>

                            <xsl:attribute name="addressId3">
                                <xsl:value-of select="count(//location[@id=../@id]/address)" />
                            </xsl:attribute>

                            <xsl:variable name="locId">
                                <xsl:value-of select="../@id" />
                            </xsl:variable>

                            <xsl:attribute name="addressId4">
                                <xsl:value-of select="count(//location[@id=$locId]/address)" />
                            </xsl:attribute>

                            <xsl:attribute name="addressId5">
                                <xsl:number count="//location[@id = '1']/address" level="any" />
                            </xsl:attribute>
                              -->

                            <xsl:value-of select="." />
                        </address>
                    </xsl:for-each>
                </location>
            </xsl:for-each>
        </result>
    </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>
share|improve this question
    
@Mathias Müller: It's very nice of you to take the time and effort to edit the posts. But could you please explain to me how removing "Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!" from Matt Felzani's original post improves the post language? I am afraid I can't see how removing basic politeness improves anything. –  michael.hor257k Dec 30 '13 at 19:16
    
I remove salutations, pre-emptive thanks and user names because I assume this is the rule on SO. See for example: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/2950/… . If you hint at the description of my edit ("post language improved") - I can simply not take the time and formulate individual edit summaries that would be more precise. –  Mathias Müller Dec 30 '13 at 20:07
    
@MathiasMüller Thanks, I've read that with great interest. I see that many people there, perhaps even the majority, happen to agree with me. In any case, in these matters I listen not to the majority but to my mother - who had taught me to always say "please" and "thank you". Well, I don't want to turn this into a similar meta discussion. Let me just point you to the official guideline #2 here:stackoverflow.com/help/behavior Not sure how people are supposed to be nice and civil if their expressions thereof are removed from their posts. –  michael.hor257k Dec 30 '13 at 20:45
    
I have read the guidelines and I am not working against them. I cannot see where you see the "majority" of people agreeing that "hi", "thanks" and "-User" should stay in place. Anyway, this is controversial and both sides have raised good points. I happen to be more convinced of the "remove" side. If this does not satisfy you, please post on Meta - where I can give you the precise rationale for the different phrases I remove. –  Mathias Müller Dec 30 '13 at 20:57
    
@MathiasMüller I don't think I can (or should) quote them all here, can I?. Besides, as I said, it doesn't really matter. I am sure that you are no less nice or civil person than me, and you certainly seem capable of forming your own opinion. I suggest you do exactly that without listening to me or to a bunch of ... well, I do want to remain civil, so I'll just say a bunch of people for whom thanks are superfluous and who would seek to impose this "rule" upon others. –  michael.hor257k Dec 30 '13 at 21:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here is one way of solving, by counting simply the preceding address elements having a location parent with the same id attribute:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">

<xsl:template match="@* | node()">
  <xsl:copy>
    <xsl:apply-templates select="@* | node()"/>
  </xsl:copy>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template match="location/address">
  <xsl:copy>
    <xsl:attribute name="addressId">
      <xsl:value-of select="count(preceding::address[../@id = current()/../@id]) + 1"/>
    </xsl:attribute>
    <xsl:apply-templates select="@* | node()"/>
  </xsl:copy>
</xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>
share|improve this answer
    
awesome, thank you! if you happen to think of what i missed with addressId, addressId2 and addressId3 above i'd love to know. i feel like xsl:number could help in a lot of cases, though i haven't found a great set of examples for the non-single case. –  Matt Felzani Dec 29 '13 at 17:49
    
also, thanks for styling the XSL for me. if i hadn't inherited the style sheet in its current structure that's how i would have done it originally too (re:templates). –  Matt Felzani Dec 29 '13 at 17:51

Re <xsl:number>: in order to have it restart at each location/@id change, you could specify:

<xsl:number from="location[@id!=preceding-sibling::location[1]/@id]" level="any" />

Note that this is not the same as counting preceding items with the same parent attribute; the difference will become apparent if you append another location with @id=1 to your current list.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks and that is helpful. it seems i have a much weaker grasp on xsl:number than i thought. is there a site you've referenced for other non-default combinations/permutations of using it? i see the w3c site, though it's more of a manual than anything i think. –  Matt Felzani Dec 30 '13 at 1:56
1  
@MattFelzani I found these to be helpful: xml.com/pub/a/2002/11/06/tr.html and xml.com/pub/a/2002/12/11/autocount.html –  michael.hor257k Dec 30 '13 at 4:51

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