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In my dataset I want to create a new variable in which the month is set one backwards. I can do it like this:

df$month.min.1 <- gsub('1', '12', df$month)
df$month.min.1 <- gsub('2', '1', df$month)
df$month.min.1 <- gsub('3', '2', df$month)
df$month.min.1 <- gsub('4', '3', df$month)
....

As I also want to create variables in which the month is set two and three months backwards, I'm wondering if there is a more efficient way to do this?

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Do you also want to change the year in the first case? –  hadley Dec 30 '13 at 14:36
    
@hadley yes, that would make it easier to make a predictive model with the other variables in the dataset –  Jaap Dec 30 '13 at 14:47

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It sounds like you just have 1 through 12 to represent your "months". If that is the case, you can write a function something like this:

myfun <- function(x = 1:12, n = 1) c(tail(x, n), head(x, -n))
myfun()
#  [1] 12  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11

You can then use that to create your lagged values.

Some examples:

set.seed(1)
x <- sample(12, 20, replace = TRUE)  ## Imagine this is your "month" variable
x
#  [1]  4  5  7 11  3 11 12  8  8  1  3  3  9  5 10  6  9 12  5 10
myfun()[x]                           ## Default -- set one month backwards
#  [1]  3  4  6 10  2 10 11  7  7 12  2  2  8  4  9  5  8 11  4  9
myfun(n = 2)[x]                      ## "n" can be changed
#  [1]  2  3  5  9  1  9 10  6  6 11  1  1  7  3  8  4  7 10  3  8
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Hmm. Downvoter care to explain why they have downvoted? –  Ananda Mahto Dec 30 '13 at 1:50

You could use difftime but for addition and subtraction I like the lubridate package. Note that this answer previously used the mydate - months(1) syntax which can give seemingly incorrect results if the date is on the last day of the month. The %m-% (or %m+%) syntax does work as most people would expect.

library(lubridate)
mydate <- as.Date('2013-12-31')
mydate %m-% months(1)

This gives the following output:

> library(lubridate)
> mydate <- as.Date('2013-12-31')
> mydate %m-% months(1)
[1] "2013-11-30"

Edit: Hadley makes the point in the comment below that it may be difficult to define what is "correct" in some circumstances. As per the lubridate package docs (my emphasis):

The logic that guides arithmetic with periods can be unintuitive. Starting with version 1.3.0, lubridate enforces the reversible property of arithmetic (e.g. a date + period - period = date) by returning an NA if you create an implausible date by adding periods with months or years units to a date. For example, adding one month to January 31st, 2013 results in February 31st, 2013, which is not a real date. lubridate users have argued in the past that February 31st, 2013 should be rolled over to March 3rd, 2013 or rolled back to February 28, 2013. However, each of these corrections would destroy the reversibility of addition (Mar 3 - one month == Feb 3 != Jan 31, Feb 28 - one month == Jan 28 != Jan 31). If you would like to add and subtract months in a way that rolls the results back to the last day of a month (when appropriate) use the special operators, %m+% and %m-%.

These are reasonable arguments, but this design philosophy does sometimes cause the months function to yield results that are neither expected nor intuitive. For example the snippet below probably surprises most users when they first encounter it:

> z <- as.Date("2008-12-31")
> z - months(1)
[1] NA

I assume that the NA is generated because November has only 30 days and thus 2013-11-31 is an impossible date. Conversely the example works fine, which is what most people would expect:

> z <- as.Date("2008-12-30")
> z - months(1)
[1] "2008-11-30"

The moral of the story is that if you are a lubridate user then in many situations you should first look at using %m-% and %m+%. Unfortunately %m-% is not a particularly memorable or comprehensible syntax, nor does it stand out in the function list of the package when you scan through the documentation. In the bookmarks of the pdf documentation, for instance, %m+% appears second from the bottom just as a matter of alphabetical ordering, leaving it a long way from month where most users would be looking for such a function.

Perhaps an 'English' alias for %m-% and %m+% would be a useful addition to the package e.g. something like months.lastday to be identical to the above syntax but used as follows:

> mydate <- as.Date('2013-12-31')
> mydate - months(1)
[1] NA
> mydate - months.lastday(1)
[1] "2013-11-30"
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Although this solution seems to work, it sometimes does not substract a month. This happens whith dates like '2013-12-31'. When substracting a month this still gives 12 as month value. –  Jaap Dec 29 '13 at 15:14
    
Saying - months(1) gives an incorrect result is not quite correct, because it's hard to know what it should mean. What is 1 month before March 31? –  hadley Dec 31 '13 at 0:47

If m is a vector of months such that each component is a number between 1 (Jan) and 12 (Dec) then this is the month numbers of the months k months prior:

(m  - k - 1) %% 12 + 1

Examples

m <- 1:12  # input months

# one month before
k <- 1
(m - k - 1) %% 12 + 1    ## 12  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11

# two months before
k <- 2
(m - k - 1) %% 12 + 1    ## 11 12  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10

# three months before
k <- 3
(m - k - 1) %% 12 + 1    ## 10 11 12  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9

# one month in the future
k <- -1
(m - k - 1) %% 12 + 1    ## 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12  1

Note If we were to use the coding 0 (Jan) to 11 (Dec) then the formula simplifies to this where m0 is the months vector in the new coding and the result is in the new coding too:

(m0 - k) %% 12
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Very nice solution. +1 –  Ananda Mahto Dec 30 '13 at 7:37

This will be more efficient:

n <- 1
df$month.min.1 <- df$month - n
df$month.min.1[df$month.min.1 < 1] <- df$month.min.1[df$month.min.1 < n] + 12

This will work for any n < 12.

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Maybe not very efficient, but this works

mydate <- as.Date('2013-12-29')
tail(seq(mydate, length.out=2, by="-1 month"),1))

If you are transforming a data frame, you may need to wrap this in a function and Vectorize it.

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