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The first example will automagically know it's size by the elements it is initialized with. The second example requires you to explicitly define the length of the array (to get it working). Why is this the case? Is there a reason behind this?

Array initialization outside a class/struct/...

const int intArray[] = { 0, 1, 2 };

struct Example
{
    int SizeOfArray()
    {
        return sizeof(intArray);
    }
};

Array initialization inside a class/struct/...

Faulting

struct Example
{
    const int intArray[] = { 0, 1, 2 };

    int SizeOfArray()
    {
        return sizeof(intArray);
    }
};

Error: cannot specify explicit initializer for arrays

Solution

struct Example
{
    const int intArray[3] = { 0, 1, 2 };

    int SizeOfArray()
    {
        return sizeof(intArray);
    }
};
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1  
I am not sure. But it's probably related to this: When you define a single array you have defined the complete object. When the array is a member of the class the type is not complete and the compiler can't allocate the required storage. The class definition is completed at the last }; of the class. –  harper Dec 29 '13 at 12:12
    
Your in-class array initialisation does need to specify the length, but does not need to wrap it in std::array: you can write it as const int intArray[3] = { 0, 1, 2 }; –  hvd Dec 29 '13 at 13:57
    
@hvd are you sure? First i had your solution but then I changed it to an std::array because when I compiled it I got the same error as in the faulting example: cannot specify explicit initializer for arrays –  Steve Van Opstal Dec 29 '13 at 14:03
1  
@SteveVanOpstal Yes, in standard C++, you can. The fact that Visual Studio rejects it is a bug. (Note: the syntax used there is different, but the problem is the same.) –  hvd Dec 29 '13 at 14:06
    
@hvd Indeed it doesn't change the problem but it is good to know. I changed it back to my original post. Yet another reason to migrate to another IDE. –  Steve Van Opstal Dec 29 '13 at 14:10

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think it's because in-class/struct initialization is just syntactic sugar for writing part of initializer list in a different place. According to this, your faulting example is equal to the following:

struct Example
{
    const int intArray[];

    Example() :
       // start of compiler-generated pseudo code
       intArray[0](0),
       intArray[1](1),
       intArray[2](2)
       // end of compiler-generated pseudo code
    {
    }

    int SizeOfArray()
    {
       return sizeof(intArray);
    }
};

The code above obviously defines an incomplete structure of unknown size, just as @harper said in his comment.

P.S. Couldn't find proof in the standard, but I'm pretty sure that it covers this case, probably implicitly.

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