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For my implementation of tail shell command in Linux, I need to read certain amount of lines/bytes from the end of the file using stream input/output. Does anyone have suggestions how to do that? I suspect I need to open a file and pass some parameter to the ifstream constructor, but I don't know what exactly. Googling didn't find anything.

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6  
The standard library has nothing to do this - you are going to have to write some code. And to implement the -f flag of tail, you will have to use some non-standard stuff. –  anon Jan 17 '10 at 20:27
    
Streams are not designed for this. Streams are for serialization (un-serialization of textual data). It would be easier to drop down to C like code. –  Loki Astari Jan 17 '10 at 20:51

5 Answers 5

Since tail needs to work with pipes, that you can't rewind, you'll have to keep a rotating buffer of the last n lines you've read which you will dump on EOF.

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This method is fine for short files. But large files require a diffeent technique. You need to seek to the end then start backing up. –  Loki Astari Jan 17 '10 at 20:47
    
You can use different techniques for different files, but the one I described is still required for things like stdin. –  Tobu Jan 17 '10 at 21:01
1  
Moreover, homework doesn't need to perform well, at least, he didn't say it does. –  Potatoswatter Jan 18 '10 at 4:59

This problem is analogous to the problem of getting the last n nodes of a singly-linked list. You have to go all the way to the end with a buffer of n lines, then spit out the lines from buffer.

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I don't think there's an easy way to go about this, you'll probably need to seek to the end of the file, back up one 'chunk' (an arbitrary size, but a couple of kilobytes perhaps), read that 'chunk' of data and start looking through it for new line characters, if you didn't find enough, you back up twice your chunk size (remember, you read forward, so you need to back up the one you read, plus the one you want to read next), and read in another one.

HTH

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#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <sstream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
  ifstream is("file.txt", ios::binary);
  if (!is) {
    cout << "Failed to open file" << endl;
    return 1;
  }

  is.seekg(0, ios::end);
  int len = is.tellg();
  char c;
  int n = 0;
  ostringstream line;
  int lines = 0;

  for (int i = len - 1; i >= 0; --i) {
    is.seekg(i, ios::beg);
    is.get(c);
    if (c == '\n' || i == 0) {
      if (i < len - 1) {
        if (i == 0) {
          line << c;
        }
        string s = line.str();
        cout << lines << ": " << string(s.rend() - n, s.rend()) << endl;
        ++lines;
        n = 0;
        line.seekp(0, ios::beg);
      }
    } else {
      line << c;
      ++n;
    }
  }

  is.close();

  return 0;
}
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1  
seeking backwards past the begininng of file (i.e. if the file is less than 4096 bytes in size) is actually undefined –  anon Jan 17 '10 at 20:58
    
this doesn't seek past the starting point –  jspcal Jan 18 '10 at 5:45

this shows how you'd do it in c++... read successive chunks from the end of the file, then scan the chunks for new lines. if a newline isn't found, part of the chunk has to be kept around and combined with the next chunk read in...

//
// USAGE: lastln COUNT [FILE]
//
// Print at most COUNT lines from the end of FILE or standard input.
// If COUNT is -1, all lines are printed.
//

#include <errno.h>
#include <libgen.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <sstream>

using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
  int ret = 0, maxLines = -1, len, count = 0, sz = 4096, lines = 0, rd;
  istream *is;
  ifstream ifs;
  stringstream ss;
  char *buf = NULL;
  const char *prog = (argc > 0 && argv[0] ? basename(argv[0]) : "");
  string line;

  if (argc > 1) {
    if ((maxLines = atoi(argv[1])) == 0) {
      goto end;
    }
  }

  if (argc > 2 && !(argv[2] && argv[2][0] == '-' && argv[2][1] == '\0')) {
    ifs.open(argv[2], ios::in | ios::binary);
    if (!ifs) {
      ret = 1;
      cerr << prog << ": " << argv[2] << ": " << strerror(errno) << endl;
      goto end;
    }
    is = &ifs;
  } else {
    ss << cin.rdbuf();
    if (!ss) {
      ret = 1;
      cerr << prog << ": failed to read input" << endl;
      goto end;
    }
    is = &ss;
  }

  is->seekg(0, ios::end);
  len = is->tellg();
  buf = new char[sz + 1];

  while (rd = min(len - count, sz)) {
    is->seekg(0 - count - rd, ios::end);
    is->read(buf, rd);
    count += rd;
    char *p = buf + rd, *q;
    *p = '\0';

    for (;;) {
      q = (char *)memrchr(buf, '\n', p - buf);
      if (q || count == len) {
        if (q) *q = '\0';
        if (lines || p - q - 1 > 0 || !q) {
          ++lines;
          cout << lines << ": " << (q ? q + 1 : buf) << line << endl;
          line.clear();
          if (lines >= maxLines && maxLines != -1) break;
        }
        if (q) p = q; else break;
      } else {
        line = string(buf, p - buf) + line;
        break;
      }
    }
  }

  end:

  if (buf) delete[] buf;
  return ret;
}
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This program uses pointers and manual memory management for no reason. The program could just as well use std::vector for dynamically allocated data and auto storage std::ifstream instead of a pointer and dynamic allocation. This avoids all cleanup at the end, thus also avoiding the use of goto. It also avoids a memory leak. –  Tronic Jan 18 '10 at 2:14
    
no, you need a pointer with memrchr. it only takes a pointer. a vector would be a pointless layer of indirection. a pointer is necessary to use cin here. you seem to forget that references can't be reseated in c++. goto is necessary so the OP can print messages at the end of the run. and there's no need to free data right before exit(). any case, you obsess over syntactic sugar. –  jspcal Jan 18 '10 at 3:32
    
I'd call it "preferring readable code", not "obsessing over syntactic sugar". This code reads more like C than idiomatic C++. You can get a pointer to the contents of a std::vector, for use with memrchr, by calling front() on it and taking the address. The pointer is not necessary to use cin; you can support both stdin and filenames on the command line, without using pointers, by putting the code in a function that takes an istream& parameter and passing it either std::cin or a std::ifstream instance as needed. –  Wyzard Jan 18 '10 at 3:50
    
@Wyzard: your solution requires adding an unnecessary function and multiple calls to it to deal with with a problem that pointers are designed to solve using c++'s built-in polymorphism. your solution doesn't scale. what if there are more than 2 stream types? you create redundant branches. you are going to extraordinary lengths to avoid pointers, which is obsessing over syntactic sugar. and you admit that even with vector, the underlying pointer is exposed in any case, so you're still using pointers. –  jspcal Jan 18 '10 at 5:44

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