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If you have ns2 as a child namespace of ns1, and you use ns1 classes inside a header for an ns2 class, do you need to explicitly decalre it as you would when ns1 & ns2 are unrelated?

e.g

button.h

namespace ns1
{
 class Button
 {
  ...
 };
}

dialog.h

include "button.h"
namespace ns1
{
 namespace ns2
 {
  class TestDialog
  {
   Button *pButton;
  };
 }
}

Should that be right? It seems I have to change dialog.h to be:

namespace ns1
{
 ----->class Button;
 namespace ns2
 {

But I'm not quite sure why. Do namespaces not inherit? If I don't make this change, I get linker errors about "unresolved symbol ns1::ns2:Button::...".

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Why don't you test it? Then you shouldn't have to ask it here. –  VDVLeon Jan 17 '10 at 21:10
    
Because I want to know how it works, not just hack code until it eventually compiles and not know why. –  Mr. Boy Jan 17 '10 at 21:12
1  
Not to answer your question, but I would really think twice before using nested namespaces - I doubt your code is complex enough to warrant them. C++ namespaces are a solution to clashing names - if your names don't clash, you don't need them. –  anon Jan 17 '10 at 21:29
    
Maybe you're right, I am infected from Java packages I suspect. –  Mr. Boy Jan 17 '10 at 21:44

3 Answers 3

All functions, classes (types), vars, etc. declared in a namespace will be available (without prefix) in all sub namepaces and so on. So when namespace n2 is defined in n1 all code in n2 can use n1 code without prefix.

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Then why do I get linker errors about unresolved "symbol ns1::ns2::Button" if I don't add that extra line? –  Mr. Boy Jan 17 '10 at 21:18
    
ns1::n2::Button does not exists, ns1::Button does. I said that inside ns2 you can use n1 code. But outside you have to give the correct prefix. –  VDVLeon Jan 17 '10 at 21:24
    
Well I have code like the example given, and it fails to link unless I make the change shown, which is using the ns1 class inside ns2. –  Mr. Boy Jan 17 '10 at 21:43

Your code works fine for me in gcc 4.4.5 without the additional declaration of Button. You are missing a # from the include line, but I suppose that is just a transcription error. Are you sure that this is the part of your code that is causing the problem?

EDIT: In your actual code, you are probably not using the names ns1 and ns2 - maybe you have misspelled the namespaces somewhere?

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You are missing a # sign, recompile with #include and you should be fine. The problem is when you don't include, you never actually declared the class in the other file.

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