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I have a struct like this:

struct Chunk
{
private:

public:
    Chunk* mParent;
    Chunk* mSubLevels;
    Int16 mDepth;
    Int16 mIndex;
    Reference<ValueType> mFirstItem;
    Reference<ValueType> mLastItem;

public:
    Chunk()
    {
        mSubLevels = nullptr;
        mFirstItem = nullptr;
        mLastItem = nullptr;
    }
    ~Chunk() {}
};

mSubLevels in chunk is null until first access. On first access to mSubLevels i create an array of chunks for mSubLevels and fill other members. but because multiple threads work with chunks i do this process with a mutex. so creation of new chunks is protected by a mutex. after this process there is no write to this chunks and they are read-only data, so threads access to this chunks without any mutex.

Indeed, i have some method, that in one of them, in first access to mSubLevels i check this pointer and if that is null i will create required data by a mutex. but other methods are read-only and i don't change structure. So i don't use any mutex in this functions. (there isn't any acquire/release ordering between thread that create chunks and threads that read them).

Now can i use regular data types, or i must use atomic types?

Edit 2:

For creating data i use double checked locking:

(This is a function that will create new chunks)

Chunk* lTargetChunk = ...;
if (!std::atomic_load(lTargetChunk->mSubLevels, std::memory_order_relaxed))
{
    std::lock_guard lGaurd(mMutex);

    if (!std::atomic_load(lTargetChunk->mSubLevels, std::memory_order_relaxed))
    {
        Chunk* lChunks = new Chunk[mLevelSizes[l]];
        for (UINT32 i = 0; i < mLevelSizes[l]; ++i)
        {
            Chunk* lCurrentChunk = &lChunks[i];
            lCurrentChunk->mParent = lTargetChunk;
            lCurrentChunk->mDepth = lDepth - 1;
            lCurrentChunk->mIndex = i;
            st::atomic_store(lCurrentChunk->mSubLevels, (Chunk*)bcNULL, memory_order_relaxed);
        }
        bcAtomicOperation::bcAtomicStore(lTargetChunk->mSubLevels, lChunks, std::memory_order_release);
    }

}

For a moment, imagine that i don't use atomic op for mSubLevels.

I have some other methods that only will read this chunks without any 'mutex':

bcInline Chunk* _getSuccessorChunk(const Chunk* pChunk)
{
    // If pChunk->mSubLevels isn't null do this operation.
    const Chunk* lChunk = &pChunk->mSubLevels[0];
    Chunk* lNextChunk;

    if (lChunk->mIndex != mLevelSizes[lChunk->mDepth] - 1)
    {
        lNextChunk = lChunk + 1;
        return lNextChunk;
    }
    else ...

As you can see i access to mSubLevels, mIndex and some other. in this function i don't use any 'mutex' so if writer thread don't flush it's cache to main memory, any thread that will run this function won't see affected changes. If i use mMutex in this function, i think the problem will be solved. (writer thread and reader threads will be synchronized via atomic operations in mutex) Now if i use atomic op for mSubLevels in first function(as i have wrote) and use 'acquire' to load that in second function:

bcInline Chunk* _getSuccessorChunk(const Chunk* pChunk)
{
    // If pChunk->mSubLevels isn't null do this operation.
    const Chunk* lChunk = &std::atomic_load(pChunk->mSubLevels, std::memory_order_acquire)[0];
    Chunk* lNextChunk;

    if (lChunk->mIndex != mLevelSizes[lChunk->mDepth] - 1)
    {
        lNextChunk = lChunk + 1;
        return lNextChunk;
    }
    else ...

Reader threads will see changes from writer thread and no cache coherence problem will happen. Is this sentence true?

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My problem is cache coherency –  MohammadRB Dec 29 '13 at 16:11
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your problem goes farther than just cache coherence. It's about correctness. What you're doing is a case of double checked locking.

It is problematic insofar as one thread may see mSubLevels being null and allocate a new object. While this is happening, another thread may concurrently access mSubLevels and see that it is null, and allocate an object as well. What now? Which one is the "correct" object to be assigned to the pointer. Will you just leak one object, or what do you do with the other one? How to detect this condition at all?

To solve this issue, you must eiher lock (i.e. use a mutex) before checking the value, or you must do some kind of atomic operation that lets you distinguish a null object from a still invalid being-created object and a valid object (such as an atomic compare-exchange with (Chunk*)1, which would basically be something like a micro-spinlock, except you're not spinning).

So in one word, yes, you must at least use atomic ops for this, or even a mutex. Using "normal" data types won't work.

For everything else where you only have readers and no writers, you can use regular types, it will work just fine.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank, I have used double check lock for creating data. –  MohammadRB Dec 29 '13 at 16:28
    
Can i use an atomic variable to sync data to avoid cache coherency problem like my edit? –  MohammadRB Dec 29 '13 at 16:59
    
Yes, and no. What you want is called "memory ordering", not cache coherency. The ordering that you chose is the correct choice for your usage, but a simple store is not sufficient to avoid the problem of possibly creating two objects. For that you either need a mutex (and then memory order is irrelevant, since the mutex is already a full barrier anyway) or you must use a construct with compare-exchange (in that case, all checks against null must be adjusted too, obviously). –  Damon Dec 29 '13 at 17:37
    
Worded differently, the store/load that you've posted in your edit will ensure that the pointer is set atomically, and it will guarantee that all the operations you've done before are seen by any thread performing the load on the pointer. They, alone, do however not prevent double-creation. –  Damon Dec 29 '13 at 17:38
    
Can you see my new edit. excuse me for my questions and thank for you time. –  MohammadRB Dec 29 '13 at 20:03
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There are two issues you need to overcome here:

  1. You cannot afford reading without the array being created, obviously
  2. For efficiency reasons, you probably do not want to create the array multiple times

I would suggest simply using a reader-writer mutex

The basic idea is:

  • lock in reader mode
  • check if the data is ready
  • if not ready, upgrade the lock to writer mode
  • check if the data is ready (it might have been prepared by another writer) and if not prepare it
  • release the lock in writer mode (keep the lock in reader mode)
  • do things with the data
  • release the lock in reader mode

There are some issues with this design (specifically the contention that occurs during initialization), but it has the advantage of being dead simple.

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Do you mean in every access to structure i must use reader lock? in one method if array is null, i must create array(in this section i use dcl), but in other methods if array is null, i don't use that and i continue... –  MohammadRB Dec 29 '13 at 16:45
    
Can i use an atomic variable to sync data to avoid cache coherency problem like my edit? –  MohammadRB Dec 29 '13 at 17:00
    
@MohammadRB: Obviously, if you do not need the array there is no need to initialize it. As for the cache coherency problem, the use of mutexes will ensure proper coherence even without atomic variables... however, I am suddenly very ill at ease here. Multi-threading is a complex topic and we are just skirting the basics, if you have never used mutexes, condition variables or semaphores before then StackOverflow is not the right place for you to learn to use them I fear; you need a much more structured lesson. I recommend C++ Concurrency In Action by Anthony Williams. –  Matthieu M. Dec 29 '13 at 17:11
    
Can you see my new edit. excuse me for my questions and thank for you time. –  MohammadRB Dec 29 '13 at 20:04
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