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I was wondering if there is an API that provides weather information in XML format, providing only City and Country.

It's even better if it has a way to return results based on IP Address.

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closed as off-topic by Juhana, rene, ProgramFOX, Unihedro, TGMCians Dec 31 '14 at 19:43

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2  
Duplicate and not searched on google. –  Chuck Vose Jan 17 '10 at 21:39
    
That's not the point of StackOverflow, bro. If you don't want to answer someone, then don't. –  Sergio Tapia Jan 17 '10 at 21:41
    
Fair point, I was sleepy and grumpy. My apologies unknown. –  Chuck Vose Jan 18 '10 at 0:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes. Google has an unofficial, unsupported API that can take city/country as input and returns XML. (It is used by their desktop gadgets)

Example URL for Tbilisi, Georgia:

http://www.google.com/ig/api?weather=Tbilisi,Georgia

Results:

<xml_api_reply version="1">
 <weather module_id="0" tab_id="0" mobile_row="0" mobile_zipped="1" row="0" section="0">
  <forecast_information>
   <city data="Tbilisi, Tbilisi"/>
   <postal_code data="Tbilisi,Georgia"/>
   <latitude_e6 data=""/>
   <longitude_e6 data=""/>
   <forecast_date data="2012-02-28"/>
   <current_date_time data="1970-01-01 00:00:00 +0000"/>
   <unit_system data="US"/>
  </forecast_information>
  <current_conditions>
   <condition data="Overcast"/>
   <temp_f data="27"/>
   <temp_c data="-3"/>
   <humidity data="Humidity: 84%"/>
   <icon data="/ig/images/weather/cloudy.gif"/>
   <wind_condition data="Wind: NE at 5 mph"/>
  </current_conditions>
  <forecast_conditions>
   <day_of_week data="Tue"/>
   <low data="30"/>
   <high data="41"/>
   <icon data="/ig/images/weather/mostly_sunny.gif"/>
   <condition data="Mostly Sunny"/>
  </forecast_conditions>
  <forecast_conditions>
   <day_of_week data="Wed"/>
   <low data="30"/>
   <high data="43"/>
   <icon data="/ig/images/weather/mostly_sunny.gif"/>
   <condition data="Mostly Sunny"/>
  </forecast_conditions>
  <forecast_conditions>
   <day_of_week data="Thu"/>
   <low data="27"/>
   <high data="43"/>
   <icon data="/ig/images/weather/mostly_sunny.gif"/>
   <condition data="Partly Sunny"/>
  </forecast_conditions>
  <forecast_conditions>
   <day_of_week data="Fri"/>
   <low data="23"/>
   <high data="36"/>
   <icon data="/ig/images/weather/mostly_sunny.gif"/>
   <condition data="Mostly Sunny"/>
  </forecast_conditions>
 </weather>
</xml_api_reply>
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2  
Google is currently removing the support of this API, as well as all the rest of iGoogle. –  daniel_or_else Mar 11 '13 at 8:34

I developed a weather gadget for my company using the Yahoo weather RSS feed. You have to supply the WOEID to get the forecast. Its pretty easy.

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2  
WOEID stands for Where on Earth ID .. You can get it for any location. If you are using yahoo weather then the numbers you see at the last in the url is the WOEID of that location. Just do a search you can also get th complete WOEID for the entire planet from Yahoo. –  Shoban Jan 17 '10 at 22:06
    
Shoban, thanks for the detailed explanation. And it's probably really forward-thinking to have it for the entire planet, but as soon as we settle on Mars, I'm gonna need that new WOEID. –  Anurag Jan 18 '10 at 5:04
    
@Anurag once we are on Mars then its WOMID :) –  Tech Jerk Jan 18 '10 at 7:09

I use a sed script. wget -q -O - http://newsrss.bbc.co.uk/weather/forecast/2302/Next3DaysRSS.xml?area=HP6 | grep title | sed -e "s/<[^>]*>//g" -e "s/ &#176//g" | egrep "^[A-Z]" | sed -e 's/&#xB0;/°/g' To get weather for my workplace.

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1  
So I guess you could write another script that got the Postcode from a IP. And parsed that into the URL. Simplez ;) –  Niceguy Jan 17 '10 at 21:55

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