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I use this WPF binding cheatsheet here:
http://www.nbdtech.com/Free/WpfBinding.pdf

I noticed that it refers to the "Current DataContext" for things like {Binding}, and {Binding Name}. In examples I've seen, the root Window's DataContext is set to some object, and child controls several levels down in the tree are able to bind to it without specifying which element's data context it is referring to. So my question is twofold:

  1. What is the Current DataContext, and how is it defined as "current"?
  2. As a follow-up question to #1, what is the "search order" (if there is such a thing) for the current data context? My understanding is that each WPF control can have its own data context, so:
    1. Does it just search up the parent/child tree until it finds the first parent with a DataContext defined?
    2. What if it doesn't find the specified property on that DataContext, does it skip it and find the next data context with that property?

Thanks in advance.

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If the DataContext is not explicitly set then it is equal to its parents DataContext. And the same for the parent. That's it. –  Johnbot Dec 29 '13 at 18:28
    
@Johnbot So does this mean that this facilitates walking up the parent/child tree until one is found, or that a child may only ever refer directly to its parent, if that child's DataContext is unset? –  void.pointer Dec 29 '13 at 18:37
    
That it walks the tree. See the answer. –  Johnbot Dec 29 '13 at 18:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

DataContext is inheritable Dependency Property i.e. child controls will inherit it unless set explicitly.

You can even make your custom Dependency Property to be inheritable by setting FrameworkPropertyMetadataOptions.Inherits flag at time of registration of Dependency property.


Now that being said, let answer your questions one by one:

1) What is the Current DataContext, and how is it defined as "current"?

Current means currently set value for DataContext which can be set explicitly or it might be inherited from its parent.

2) Does it just search up the parent/child tree until it finds the first parent with a DataContext defined?

Yes, your guess is right.

3) What if it doesn't find the specified property on that DataContext, does it skip it and find the next data context with that property?

No, if it doesn't find that property on DataContext, binding will break silently and error will be logged in output window. However, you can give FallbackValue in case binding fails.

Suppose you have TextBlock declared like this:

<TextBlock Text="{Binding Name, FallbackValue=BindingFailed}"/>

First Name property will be searched in current DataContext. If found text will be shown but in case property is not found, Text will be set to BindingFailed.

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This is very helpful, thanks a ton. I also read this article after posting which helps clarify it completely + your answer: rachel53461.wordpress.com/2012/07/14/… –  void.pointer Dec 29 '13 at 18:49
    
Your welcome Robert. I agree Rachael's blogs are very informative as well. :) –  Rohit Vats Dec 29 '13 at 18:51

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