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The following code is my implementation (Python 3.3.1) to see if I can demonstrate that switching is effective in the Monty Hall Problem. When I have the player keep their first choice, I get a correct guess result of about 0.33 roughly, which is expected. The issue occurs when I have the player switch - instead of getting the expected ~0.66, I consistently get ~0.55.

Can anyone see the error? (also, as a side note, any improvements I could make to the code would be appreciated)

def runInstance(switch): #run a single Monty Hall Problem instance
    choicesList = [False,False,False]
    intTruth = randint(0,2)
    choicesList[intTruth] = True #list has been set up with 2 False, 1 True
    intChoice = randint(0,2)
    for index in range(0,len(choicesList)): #Loop finds entry index which is not chosen and is False to "present" to player
        if( (intChoice != index) and (choicesList[index] == False) ):
            alternate = index
    if(switch):
        for index in range(0,len(choicesList)): #Loop finds entry index which hasn't been chosen, and isn't the "Opened Door", then switches to it
            if( (index != intChoice) and (index != alternate) ):
                intChoice = index
    return choicesList[intChoice]

def runBatch(inputSize, switch): #Run batch of instances for stats
    successCount = 0.0
    for index in range(0,int(inputSize)):
        if(runInstance(switch)):
            successCount += 1.0
    print(str(successCount/inputSize))

runBatch(100000.0, True) #Number of instances to run, and boolean indicating whether to switch
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Change the code to:

origChoice = intChoice
if(switch):
    for index in range(0,len(choicesList)): #Loop finds entry index which hasn't been chosen, and isn't the "Opened Door", then switches to it
        if( (index != origChoice) and (index != alternate) ):
            intChoice = index

The problem is that sometimes you would switch and then switch back to your original choice.

In other words, if intChoice=2,alternate=1 then:

  1. On the first interation intChoice would change to 0
  2. On the second iteration nothing would happen (because index==alternate)
  3. On the third iteration intChoice would change back to 2
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Spot on, that was it, thank you very much. I just put two breaks into each for-loop, called after the assignment inside the if statement, and that fixed it. In your opinion, is that less efficient than the code you offered above? –  Geesh_SO Dec 29 '13 at 19:18
1  
Your suggested fix sounds better than mine as it reduces the number of iterations in some cases, nice one :) –  Peter de Rivaz Dec 29 '13 at 19:20
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As you've seen, you need a break:

    if(switch):
        for index in range(0,len(choicesList)): #Loop finds entry index which hasn't been chosen, and isn't the "Opened Door", then switches to it
            if( (index != intChoice) and (index != alternate) ):
                intChoice = index
                break

In order to answer the second part of your question, here's my implementation:

import random

def monty_hall(switch):
    correct = random.randint(0, 2)
    choice = random.randint(0, 2)
    known_false = ({0, 1, 2} - {choice, correct}).pop()

    if switch:
        choice = ({0, 1, 2} - {choice, known_false}).pop()

    return choice == correct

def simulate_many(number, switch):
    number_correct = sum(monty_hall(switch) for _ in range(number))

    print(number_correct / number)

simulate_many(10000, True)

(For Python 3; Python 2 might need a few alterations.)

  • Instead of a loop to find the unwanted indexes, a set operation is used. A result is then poped.

  • Try not to pretend that the language is typed, or that it is Java: it is not.

  • What's with int(inputSize)? Do you want to allow strs to be passed in? Or non-integral floats? Let the caller deal with that.

  • There's no need to keep a list around, too.

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That's beautifully succinct. I've seen many elegant solutions to a lot of problems which really should have taught me that thinking a bit more like a Mathematician would help improve my code. –  Geesh_SO Dec 29 '13 at 19:24
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Here is a short, readable version:

def mh(trials=1000):
    kept, switched = 0, 0
    for trial in range(trials):
        behind_curtains = ['goat', 'goat', 'boat']
        shuffle(behind_curtains)
        kept += behind_curtains.pop() is 'boat'
        behind_curtains.remove('goat')
        switched += behind_curtains[0] is 'boat'
    print ('Keeping 1st choice won {} times. \n'
           'Switching choice won {} times').format(kept, switched)
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