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These-days I'm referring File Handling System Calls in Linux.

Furthermore I understood ELF which is Executable and Linkable Format , contains set of sections.

Those are .bss , .data , .rodata , .text , .comment , and unknown

I referred Wikipedia and this Website to study

So I have below questions

why ELF file uses set of sections?

what is the task of each above section ?

what is the feasibility of this using set of sections ?

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1 Answer 1

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A good reference for the ELF file format is the Object Files chapter of the System V ABI. In particular, special sections describes the uses of most of the sections you're likely to encounter.

why ELF file uses set of sections?

An object file contains lots of different classes of data, and it makes sense to group similar data into sections, especially since some sections' contents can be read directly into a process's image when the OS execs the ELF file.

  • .bss contains uninitialized data, such as int a; declared at global level in a C program. Actually, it contains nothing except the size that needs to be allocated when the ELF file is loaded into a process, because all variables in bss are initialized to 0.
  • .data contains initialized data, such as int a = 1000; declared at global level in a C program.
  • .rodata contains read-only data, such as character string literals and global level variables declared as const in C. When the OS execs the ELF file, it will load this section into an area of memory that is read-only.
  • .text contains executable instructions. When the OS execs the ELF file, it will load this section into an area of memory that is read-only. Sometimes .text and .rodata wind up being loaded into the same area of a process's memory.
  • .comment typically contains the name and version of the compiler(s) used to generate the file.

Not all of the sections described in the documentation may be present in all ELF files; in particular, running the strip command on the ELF file will remove the .symtab and .debug sections.

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yes, that's it. this helps lot .thanks. –  kelum Dec 29 '13 at 23:43

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