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I need to speed up the function below :

import numpy as np
import itertools
import timeit

def combcol(myarr):
    ndims = myarr.shape[0]
    solutions = []
    for idx1, idx2, idx3, idx4, idx5, idx6 in itertools.combinations(np.arange(ndims), 6):
        c1, c2, c3, c4, c5, c6 = myarr[idx1,1], myarr[idx2,2], myarr[idx3,1], myarr[idx4,2], myarr[idx5,1], myarr[idx6,2]
        if c1-c2>0 and c2-c3<0 and c3-c4>0 and c4-c5<0 and c5-c6>0 :
            solutions.append(((idx1, idx2, idx3, idx4, idx5, idx6),(c1, c2, c3, c4, c5, c6)))
    return solutions

X = np.random.random((20, 10))  
Y = np.random.random((40, 10))  


if __name__=='__main__':
    from timeit import Timer
    t = Timer(lambda : combcol(X))
    t1 = Timer(lambda : combcol(Y))
    print('t : ',t.timeit(number=1),'t1 : ',t1.timeit(number=1))

Results :

t :  0.6165180211451455 t1 :  64.49216925614847 

The algorithm is too slow for my standard use (myarr.shape[0] = 500). Is there a NumPy way to decrease execution time of this function (without wasting too much memory)?
Is it possible to implement the problem in Cython?

I've tried using cProfile to see which parts are slow. Most of the time here is spent calling combcol().

import profile
........
........
profile.run('print(len(combcol(Y))); print')

144547
         144559 function calls in 39.672 seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
   144547    0.641    0.000    0.641    0.000 :0(append)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 :0(arange)
        2    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 :0(charmap_encode)
        1    0.000    0.000   39.672   39.672 :0(exec)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 :0(len)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 :0(print)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 :0(setprofile)
        1    0.094    0.094   39.672   39.672 <string>:1(<module>)
        2    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 cp850.py:18(encode)
        1   38.938   38.938   39.578   39.578 essaiNumpy4.py:13(combcol)
        1    0.000    0.000   39.672   39.672 profile:0(print(len(combcol(Y))); print)
        0    0.000             0.000          profile:0(profiler)

Finally I have modified the code like this :

def combcol2(myarr):
    ndims = myarr.shape[0]
    myarr1 = myarr[:,1].tolist()
    myarr2 = myarr[:,2].tolist()
    solutions = []
    for idx1, idx2, idx3, idx4, idx5, idx6 in itertools.combinations(range(ndims), 6):
        if myarr1[idx1] > myarr2[idx2] < myarr1[idx3] > myarr2[idx4] < myarr1[idx5] > myarr2[idx6]:
            solutions.append(((idx1, idx2, idx3, idx4, idx5, idx6),(myarr1[idx1], myarr2[idx2], myarr1[idx3], myarr2[idx4], myarr1[idx5], myarr2[idx6])))
    return solutions

X = np.random.random((40, 10))

if __name__=='__main__':
    from timeit import Timer
    t = Timer(lambda : combcol2(X))
    print('t : ',t.timeit(number=1))

Result :

t :  4.341582240200919
share|improve this question
1  
can you explain what the function is supposed to do? –  shx2 Dec 29 '13 at 19:47
    
Have you tried using cProfile to see which parts are slow? Ultimately that is a huge number of combinations, which is going to limit how much you can speed it up. –  BrenBarn Dec 29 '13 at 19:47
    
If you're willing to reimplement itertools.combinations that looks easily rewritable in Cython. –  Veedrac Dec 29 '13 at 19:52
1  
itertools.combinations is already written in C. The real problem here is that 500-choose-6 is over 21 trillion. That's hopeless :-) –  Tim Peters Dec 29 '13 at 19:54
    
We would probably be able to help more if you told us what you were trying to achieve with all the combinations. –  cyborg Dec 29 '13 at 20:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

alko has listed a useful overhaul for your program, and Tim Peters has pointed out that 500-choose-6 is over 21 trillion (ie 21057686727000). This answer will point out a simple speedup to your original program. (I think it's a small speedup compared to what alko's method might offer, but the following is worth noting for future python programming.)

Your selection statement is
if c1-c2>0 and c2-c3<0 and c3-c4>0 and c4-c5<0 and c5-c6>0 :
which is equivalent to
if c1>c2 and c2<c3 and c3>c4 and c4<c5 and c5>c6 :
but in the python interpreter the former takes 67% longer than the latter. For example, here are some sample outputs for the two cases, on my Intel i3-2120 machine (apparently several times faster than your machine) running Python 2.7.5+ :
('t : ', 0.12977099418640137, 't1 : ', 14.45378589630127)
('t : ', 0.0887291431427002, 't1 : ', 8.54729700088501)
The ratio of averages over 4 such runs was 14.529/8.709 = 1.668.

share|improve this answer

I don't know what exactly you're trying to get, but from your code, constraint for your solutions, idx1 ... idx6 are of form

X[idx1, 1] > X[idx2, 2]
X[idx3, 1] > X[idx2, 2]

X[idx3, 1] > X[idx4, 2]
X[idx5, 1] > X[idx4, 2]

X[idx5, 1] > X[idx6, 2]

You can get (almost instantly for shape <= 500) all admisible pairs (idx1, idx2), (idx3, idx2), (idx3, idx4), (idx5, idx4), idx(5, idx6) of this form with

idx56 = lst = zip(*np.where((X[:,1].reshape(-1,1)>X[:,2].reshape(1,-1))))

Then you can generate all possible indices with:

import operator 
slst = sorted(lst, key=operator.itemgetter(1))
grps = [[x, list(g)] for x, g in itertools.groupby(slst, key=operator.itemgetter(1))]
idx345 = idx123 = [[x1, x2, x3] for _, g in grps for ((x1, x2), (x3, _)) in itertools.combinations(g, 2)]

It took some seconds to compute those lists on my test machine (idx345 was more than 20 billion items long). You just have to join those lists on x3=x3, x5=x5 (I bet solution size will significantly grow with this join, so can't guess it's usefulness).

share|improve this answer
    
In python 3 operator.itemgetter appears to not work. –  user3144427 Dec 30 '13 at 0:44

You could iterate over combinations with a recursion, not using itetools.combinations(). The benefit of that would be that you could test, e.g., whether c1>c2, and if False, you could skip all related combinations.

share|improve this answer
    
How can i do with a resurvive fonction like this : def combinations(*seqs): if not seqs: return (item for item in ()) first, rest = seqs[0], seqs[1:] if not rest: return ((item,) for item in first) return ((item,) + items for item in first for items in combinations(*rest)) –  user3144427 Dec 30 '13 at 18:14
    
I think that the answer in codereview.stackexchange.com/a/38299 is good enough, if you always have 6 items. –  cyborg Dec 30 '13 at 18:59

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