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Toolchain for c++ and assembler: GNU

I have the following C++ code:

int main(void)
{
  int i = 33, j = 66;
  swap(i,j);

  cout << i << ", " << j << endl;

  return(0);
}

If I now check the assembler code generated I get in the area of the swap call the following:

movl    $33, -24(%rbp)
movl    $66, -20(%rbp)
leaq    -20(%rbp), %rdx
leaq    -24(%rbp), %rax
movq    %rdx, %rsi
movq    %rax, %rdi
call    _ZSt4swapIiEvRT_S1_
movl    -20(%rbp), %ebx
movl    -24(%rbp), %eax

And the swap routine itself is:

_ZSt4swapIiEvRT_S1_:
.LFB1232:
.cfi_startproc
pushq   %rbp
.cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
.cfi_offset 6, -16
movq    %rsp, %rbp
.cfi_def_cfa_register 6
movq    %rdi, -24(%rbp)
movq    %rsi, -32(%rbp)
movq    -24(%rbp), %rax
movl    (%rax), %eax
movl    %eax, -4(%rbp)
movq    -32(%rbp), %rax
movl    (%rax), %edx
movq    -24(%rbp), %rax
movl    %edx, (%rax)
movq    -32(%rbp), %rax
movl    -4(%rbp), %edx
movl    %edx, (%rax)
popq    %rbp
.cfi_def_cfa 7, 8
ret
.cfi_endproc

So - since I am not that familiar with assembler - does that mean that for references the address of the variables is given directly to the function? And this would mean that they are not passed through the stack (which makes sense, because that what references should be)?

What does this do? (in the area around the call):

movq    %rdx, %rsi
movq    %rax, %rdi
share|improve this question
1  
Just plain pointers, LEAQ generates the value. Your last snippet is unnecessary register jostling to pass the arguments through rsi and rdi. Looking at unoptimized code isn't that interesting. –  Hans Passant Dec 30 '13 at 0:23
    
OK... which optimization would you suggest to get rid of "unnecessary register jostling" (but still keeping the interessting pare - calling a function using references)? Because if I add flag "-O1" then swap is optimized away and the values are directly given to stdout (which makes sense)... –  Michael Dec 30 '13 at 0:34
1  
@Michael even though it was optimized away at the call site, the body of the function should have been emitted unless you gave it internal linkage, look for its name in the assembly. Or just don't call it at all, compile a file that provides only the function definition. –  Cubbi Dec 30 '13 at 2:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As far as the compiler is concerned, references are simply pointers. The difference between the two lies entirely in how the programmer uses them.

share|improve this answer
1  
Not necessarily. A reference can be implemented to involve no indirection at all. –  Joseph Mansfield Dec 30 '13 at 0:19
    
@sftrabbit An interesting claim. Do you have any references for that? –  Olaf Dietsche Dec 30 '13 at 0:26
    
would a pointer do? –  Yakk Dec 30 '13 at 0:54
    
@Yakk Nice play on words :-) and yes, of course, a pointer would do as well. –  Olaf Dietsche Dec 30 '13 at 1:35

A reference is nothing more than a pointer, "just" with a different notation.

So, in the end the generated assembly code will be the same whether you use pointers or references

void swap1(int &a, int &b)
{
    int tmp = a;
    a = b;
    b = tmp;
}

void swap2(int *a, int *b)
{
    int tmp = *a;
    *a = *b;
    *b = tmp;
}
_Z5swap1RiS_:
.LFB0:
    .cfi_startproc
    movl    (%rdi), %eax
    movl    (%rsi), %edx
    movl    %edx, (%rdi)
    movl    %eax, (%rsi)
    ret
    .cfi_endproc

_Z5swap2PiS_:
.LFB1:
    .cfi_startproc
    movl    (%rdi), %eax
    movl    (%rsi), %edx
    movl    %edx, (%rdi)
    movl    %eax, (%rsi)
    ret
    .cfi_endproc
share|improve this answer
    
com actually uses this fact to make interop with C easier. The REFGUID macro is defined as const GUID * in C and const GUID& in C++ –  Mgetz Dec 30 '13 at 0:20

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