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Thanks to user3125280, D.W. and Evgeny Kluev the question is updated.

I have a list of webpages and I must download them frequently, each webpage got a different download frequency. Based on this frequency we group the webpages in 5 groups:

Items in group 1 are downloaded once per 1 hour
items in group 2 once per 2 hours
items in group 3 once per 4 hours
items in group 4 once per 12 hours
items in group 5 once per 24 hours

This means, we must download all the group 1 webpages in 1 hour, all the group 2 in 2 hours etc.

I am trying to make an algorithm. As input, I have:

a) DATA_ARR = one array with 5 numbers. Each number represents the number of items in this group.

b) TIME_ARR = one array with 5 numbers (1, 2, 4, 12, 24) representing how often the items will be downloaded.

b) X = the total number of webpages to download per hour. This is calculated using items_in_group/download_frequently and rounded upwards. If we have 15 items in group 5, and 3 items in group 4, this will be 15/24 + 3/12 = 0.875 and rounded is 1.

Every hour my program must download at max X sites. I expect the algorithm to output something like:

Hour 1: A1 B0 C4 D5
Hour 2: A2 B1 C2 D2
...

A1 = 2nd item of 1st group
C0 = 1st item of 3rd group

My algorithm must be as efficient as possible. This means:

a) the pattern must be extendable to at least 200+ hours
b) no need to create a repeatable pattern
c) spaces are needed when possible in order to use the absolute minimum bandwidth
d) never ever download an item more often than the update frequency, no exceptions


Example:

group 1: 0 items | once per 1 hour
group 2: 3 items | once per 2 hours
group 3: 4 items | once per 4 hours
group 4: 0 items | once per 12 hours
group 5: 0 items | once per 24 hours

We calculate the number of items we can take per hour: 3/2+4/4 = 2.5. We round this upwards and it's 3.

Using pencil and paper, we can found the following solution:

Hour 1: B0 C0 B1
Hour 2: B2 C1 c2
Hour 3: B0 C3 B1
Hour 4: B2
Hour 5: B0 C0 B1
Hour 6: B2 C1 c2
Hour 7: B0 C3 B1
Hour 8: B2
Hour 9: B0 C0 B1
Hour 10: B2 C1 c2
Hour 11: B0 C3 B1
Hour 12: B2
Hour 13: B0 C0 B1
Hour 14: B2 C1 c2
and continue the above.

We take C0, C1 C2, and C3 once every 4 hours. We also take B0, B1 and B2 once every 2 hours.


Question: Please, explain to me, how to design an algorithm able to download the items, while using the absolute minimum number of downloads? Brute force is NOT a solution and the algorithm must be efficient CPU wise because the number of elements can be huge.

You may read the answer posted here: http://cs.stackexchange.com/a/19422/12497 as well as the answer posted bellow by user3125280.

share|improve this question
1  
Better, lets call this a c++ question however and remove the tags for all the other languages. – paqogomez Dec 30 '13 at 4:33
3  
What is your exact question? – Digital_Reality Dec 30 '13 at 4:33
1  
@paqogomez I see no c++; I removed everything but 'c', gah, missed the std cout – Brian Roach Dec 30 '13 at 4:34
2  
You should not re-post a deleted question, you should make an effort to fix the previous post, only 10k+ user can actually view it though. – Shafik Yaghmour Dec 30 '13 at 4:34
2  
I added more tags in order to be viewed by more people as i understand and can write code in all languages I tagged. cout is c++ also. Anyway, I am new so I will listen to the seniors here. @Digital_Reality: In the given 'refresh time' we must take at least once each item from that group. you can run my code on codepad.org and see. This will help you understand more. – Luka Dec 30 '13 at 4:36
up vote 11 down vote accepted
+100

You problem is a typical scheduling problem. These kinds of problems are well studied in computer science so there is a huge array of literature to consult.

The code is kind of like Deficit round robin, but with a few simplifications. First, we feed the queues ourself by adding to the data_to_process variable. Secondly, the queues just iterate through a list of values.

One difference is that this solution will get the optimal value you want, barring mathematical error.

Rough sketch: have not compiled (c++11) unix based, to spec code

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <numeric>
#include <unistd.h>
//#include <cmath> //for ceil

#define TIME_SCALE ((double)60.0) //1 for realtime speed

//Assuming you are not refreshing ints in the real case
template<typename T>
struct queue
{
    const std::vector<T> data; //this will be filled with numbers
    int position;

    double refresh_rate; //must be refreshed ever ~ hours
    double data_rate; //this many refreshes per hour
    double credit; //amount of refreshes owed

    queue(std::initializer_list<T> v, int r ) :
        data(v), position(0), refresh_rate(r), credit(0) {
        data_rate = data.size() / (double) refresh_rate;
    }

    int getNext() {
        return data[position++ % data.size()];
    }
};

double time_passed(){
static double total;
//if(total < 20){ //stop early
    usleep(60000000 / TIME_SCALE); //sleep for a minute
    total += 1.0 / 60.0; //add a minute
    std::cout << "Time: " << total << std::endl;
    return 1.0; //change to 1.0 / 60.0 for real time speed
//} else return 0;
}

int main()
{
    //keep a list of the queues
    std::vector<queue<int> > queues{
    {{1, 2, 3}, 2},
    {{1, 2, 3, 4}, 3}};

    double total_data_rate = 0;
    for(auto q : queues) total_data_rate += q.data_rate;

    double data_to_process = 0; //how many refreshes we have to do
    int queue_number = 0; //which queue we are processing

    auto current_queue = &queues[0];

    while(1) {
        data_to_process += time_passed() * total_data_rate;
        //data_to_process = ceil(data_to_process) //optional

        while(data_to_process >= 1){
            //data_to_process >= 0 will make the the scheduler more
            //eager in the first time period (ie. everything will updated correctly
            //in the first period and and following periods
            if(current_queue->credit >= 1){
            //don't change here though, since credit determines the weighting only,
            //not how many refreshes are made
                //refresh(current_queue.getNext();
                std::cout << "From queue " << queue_number << " refreshed " <<
                current_queue->getNext() << std::endl;
                current_queue->credit -= 1;
                data_to_process -= 1;
            } else {
                queue_number = (queue_number + 1) % queues.size();
                current_queue = &queues[queue_number];
                current_queue->credit += current_queue->data_rate;
            }
        }
    }
   return 0;
}

The example should now compile on gcc with --std=c++11 and give you what you want.

and here is test case output: (for non-time scaled earlier code)

Time: 0
From queue 1 refreshed 1
From queue 0 refreshed 1
From queue 1 refreshed 2
Time: 1
From queue 0 refreshed 2
From queue 0 refreshed 3
From queue 1 refreshed 3
Time: 2
From queue 0 refreshed 1
From queue 1 refreshed 4
From queue 1 refreshed 1
Time: 3
From queue 0 refreshed 2
From queue 0 refreshed 3
From queue 1 refreshed 2
Time: 4
From queue 0 refreshed 1
From queue 1 refreshed 3
From queue 0 refreshed 2
Time: 5
From queue 0 refreshed 3
From queue 1 refreshed 4
From queue 1 refreshed 1

As an extension, to answer the repeating pattern problem by allowing this scheduler to complete only the first lcm(update_rate * lcm(...refresh rates...), ceil(update_rate)) steps, and then repeating the pattern.

ALSO: this will, indeed, be unsolvable sometimes because of the requirement on hour boundaries. When I use your unsolvable example, and modify time_passed to return 0.1, the schedule is solved with updates every 1.1 hours (just not at the hour boundaries!).

share|improve this answer
    
Hey, thanks for pointing this out. It's close to my problem. Can you find any source explaining how this works? – Luka Dec 30 '13 at 5:16
    
in this case, it's probably easy enough to work out how many must be extracted from each list per unit time, and then do the extracting at the start of each time unit (hour/second/whatever). I suggested the scheduling analogy since things seemed a little simplified and scheduling could help with more complicated cases – user3125280 Dec 30 '13 at 5:20
2  
What you say is correct but really not enough to solve the puzzle. – Luka Dec 30 '13 at 7:55
    
My algorithm shares a few things with weighted fair queuing but there are differences also. All in all, reading those very few sites in the web regarding the subject doesn't help me solve this. – Luka Dec 30 '13 at 13:12
    
@Luka i wrote some code before, i'll post it in a couple of minutes – user3125280 Dec 30 '13 at 13:14

It seems your constraints are all over the place. To quickly summarise my other answer:

  • It meets the refresh rates only on average
  • It does the least number of downloads at hour intervals required to fulfil the above

It was based on these (sometimes unfulfillable) constraints

  1. Update at discrete, 1 hour intervals
  2. Update the fewest items each time
  3. Update each item at fixed intervals

and broke 3.

Since both the hourly interval and least-each-time constraints are not really necessary, I will give a simpler, better answer here, which breaks 2.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <numeric>
#include <unistd.h>

#define TIME_SCALE ((double)60.0)

//Assuming you are not refreshing ints in the real case
template<typename T>
struct queue
{
    const std::vector<T> data; //this is the data to refresh
    int position; //this is the data we are up to
    double refresh_rate; //must be refreshed every this many hours
    double data_rate; //this many refreshes per hour
    double credit; //is owed this many refreshes
    const char* name;//a name for each queue

    queue(std::initializer_list<T> v, int r, const char* n ) :
        data(v), position(0), refresh_rate(r), credit(0), name(n) {
        data_rate = data.size() / (double) refresh_rate;
    }

    void refresh() {
        std::cout << "From queue " << name << " refreshed " << data[position++ % data.size()] << "\n";
    }
};

double time_passed(){
static double total;
    usleep(60000000 / TIME_SCALE); //sleep for a minute
    total += 1.0; //add a minute
    std::cout << "Time: " << total << std::endl;
    return 1.0; //change to 1.0 / 60.0 for real time speed
}

int main()
{
    //keep a list of the queues
    std::vector<queue<int> > queues{
        {{1}, 1, "A"},
        {{1}, 2, "B"}};

    while(1) {
        auto t = time_passed();
        for(queue<int>& q : queues) {
            q.credit += q.data_rate * t;
            while(q.credit >= 1){
                q.refresh();
                q.credit -= 1.0;
            }
        }
    }
   return 0;
}

It has the potential, however, to schedule many refreshes on the same hour. There is a third option as well, which breaks the hour-interval rule and updates only one at a time.

I think this is the easiest and requires the minimal number of updates (like the previous answer) but doesn't break rule 3.

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