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This confuses me, in the most simplest terms what does it do? Pretend you are explaining to your mother or someone almost please.

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83  
My mother wouldn't understand it anyway... –  Bruno Reis Jan 18 '10 at 1:30
3  
@JasonDavis I keep answering your questions... I'm beginning to feel like a stalker. –  Tyler Carter Jan 18 '10 at 1:47

8 Answers 8

up vote 127 down vote accepted

A factory creates an object. So, if you wanted to build

 class A{
    public $classb;
    public $classc;
    public function __construct($classb, $classc)
    {
         $this->classb = $classb;
         $this->classc = $classc;
    }
  }

You wouldn't want to rely on having to do the following code everytime you create the object

$obj = new ClassA(new ClassB, new Class C);

That is where the factory would come in. We define a factory to take care of that for us:

class Factory{
    public function build()
    {
        $classc = $this->buildC();
        $classb = $this->buildB();
        return $this->buildA($classb, $classc);

    }

    public function buildA($classb, $classc)
    {
        return new ClassA($classb, $classc);
    }

    public function buildB()
    {
        return new ClassB;
    }

    public function buildC()
    {
        return new ClassC;
    }
}

Now all we have to do is

$factory = new Factory;
$obj     = $factory->build();

The real advantage is when you want to change the class. Lets say we wanted to pass in a different ClassC:

class Factory_New extends Factory{
    public function buildC(){
        return new ClassD;
    }
}

or a new ClassB:

class Factory_New2 extends Factory{
    public function buildB(){
        return new ClassE;
    }
}

Now we can use inheritance to easily modify how the class is created, to put in a different set of classes.

A good example might be this user class:

class User{
    public $data;
    public function __construct($data)
    {
        $this->data = $data;
    }
}

In this class $data is the class we use to store our data. Now for this class, lets say we use a Session to store our data. The factory would look like this:

class Factory{
    public function build()
    {
        $data = $this->buildData();
        return $this->buildUser($data);
    }

    public function buildData()
    {
        return SessionObject();
    }

    public function buildUser($data)
    {
        return User($data);
    }
}

Now, lets say instead we want to store all of our data in the database, it is really simple to change it:

class Factory_New extends Factory{
    public function buildData()
    {
        return DatabaseObject();
    }
}

Factories are a design pattern we use to control how we put objects together, and using correct factory patterns allows us to create the customized objects we need.

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7  
+1 great example –  Parrots Jan 18 '10 at 1:43
1  
That was a lot of typing. Now I will have to put it on my wiki at some point. –  Tyler Carter Jan 18 '10 at 1:45
    
thanks thats helps some –  jasondavis Jan 18 '10 at 1:54
    
Nice and helpful. Hats off to you mate. –  stefgosselin May 13 '11 at 5:43

Like a real life factory, it creates something and returns it.

Imagine something like this

$joe = new Joe();
$joe->say('hello');

or a factory method

Joe::Factory()->say('hello');

The implementation of the factory method will create a new instance and return it.

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1  
Nice example, amazes me how varied the implementations are for this pattern. When called statically, I assume one can one get a reference to the instance to reuse same instance later on? ie $joe = Joe::Factory()->say('hello'); –  stefgosselin May 13 '11 at 9:30

I actually tried to explain not to much what one is, but instead when to use one just the other day in a blog i have just started. The reason i am linking the post here is because it will also show you via code not only what the factory does, but also an example of when to use it!

Practical use of the factory pattern, polymorphism and interfaces in PHP

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Factory Design Pattern (Factory Pattern) is for loose coupling. Like the meaning of factory, data to a factory (produce data) to final user. By this way, the factory break the tight coupling between source of data and process of data.

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This answer is in relation to other post in which Daniel White said to use factory for creating MySQL connection using factory pattern.

For MySQL connection I would rather use singleton pattern as you want to use same connection for accessing the database not create another one.

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Classic instantiation of an object is:

$Object=new Class();

PHP has the ability to dynamically create an object from variable name using the following syntax:

$Object=new $name;

where $name contains the name of class one wants to instantiate.

Classic object factoring would look like:

function getInstance($class)
{
  if($class==='Customer')
  {
    $Object=new Customer();
  }
  elseif($class==='Product')
  {
    $Object=new Product();
  }
  return $Object;
}

and if you call getInstance('Product') function this factory will create and return Product object.

There's no need for that any more, one can send 'Product' or 'Custome' as a value of variable for dynamic instantiation:

$name='Product';
$Object=new $name; //this will instantiate new Product()
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In general a "factory" produces something: in the case of Object-Orientated-Programming, a "factory design pattern" produces objects.

It doesn't matter if it's in PHP, C# or any other Object-Orientated language.

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A factory just generates an object or objects.

You may have a factory that builds a MySQL connection.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Factory_method_pattern

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protected by Shankar Damodaran Feb 10 at 5:29

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