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I want to convert WKB representations of XY coordinates into a YX format. The code I'm using works with 42 character WKB strings, but when I use it on 50 character strings it gives me an odd YX output. I'm running Python 2.7.5.

Here's my code:

from osgeo import ogr
from binascii import unhexlify

## converts a WKB string into a YX coordinate

input = raw_input("Enter WKB string: ")
wkb = unhexlify(input)
point = ogr.CreateGeometryFromWkb(wkb)
print "%.3f,%.3f" % (point.GetY(), point.GetX())


# no work 0101000020E6100000BD30B7B921A85AC07513F26D8A1A4840
# work    0101000000C458A65F22A85AC0E412471E881A4840

When I input the 42 character string my results are good: POINT (-106.627098 48.207279)

but when I input my 50 character string I get: 355513472847601729897331967629935245053837846890691162677352753848836303684477311589993604618806134471993299583159702126592.000,-0.000

when I print the point only, I get this: POINT (-0.0 too_big)

can anyone help me with an explanation?

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3 Answers 3

Where does this 50 chars string come from? It's header, 0101000020 do not seem to be a valid WKB header, as first 01 implies little-endiannes, so geomertry type is translated as 0x20000001, which is undefined.

Second, for a point length of WKB representation is 42, never 50, as coordinates are doubles (8 bytes long), hence 16 chars long when hexlified. See for your working example:

>>> s = 'C458A65F22A85AC0E412471E881A4840'
>>> struct.unpack('<d', unhexlify(s[:16]))
(-106.62709799999999,)
>>> struct.unpack('<d', unhexlify(s[16:]))
(48.207279,)

It is then clear why your second example do not work, as something like follows happens (not sure how exactly 16 chars substring are extracted by osgeo):

>>> s = 'E6100000BD30B7B921A85AC07513F26D8A1A4840'
>>> struct.unpack('>d', unhexlify(s[-32:-16]))
(-5.939309002701494e-14,)
>>> struct.unpack('>d', unhexlify(s[-16:]))
(9.359519850637786e+255,)    
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My 50 character string comes from manually edited points. When I input the 50 character string into QGIS I get a valid point. Also, when I run this in psql:

select concat(Y,',',X) as YX from
(select ST_Y('0101000020E6100000BD30B7B921A85AC07513F26D8A1A4840') as Y, st_x('0101000020E6100000BD30B7B921A85AC07513F26D8A1A4840') as X) as meister;

I get a valid YX:

48.2073495323192,-106.627058438203

So the WKB is valid and reads a a point geometry. but for some reason unhexlify can't read it as well as the psql function can. Could this be a multidimensional point since it has been created and edited multiple times?

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2  
"I ordered a cup of coffee in Klingon and the barrista gave me a cup of coffee, therefore the barrista speaks Klingon"; Just because psql was able to produce a result does not mean that the input was well formed. –  SingleNegationElimination Dec 30 '13 at 20:19
    
You can see that last two expressions in my answer, applied to your strings retuns pretty same result, 48.207349532319235, -106.62705843820272. But this do not mean that strings are valid WKBs but that psql do not check for it's validity, and may implement different logic from osgis, working differently in non documented corner cases. –  alko Dec 30 '13 at 21:01
    
Hi Zoombear, this answer looks for me as it should have been an edit on your question? Would you mind editing your question and remove the answer if I'm right? –  bummi Apr 10 at 20:23

I figured it out. It's a bit hackey, though

So the 50 character string that didn't work was this: 0101000020E6100000BD30B7B921A85AC07513F26D8A1A4840

I made some changes and turned it into this and it worked: 0101000020BD30B7B921A85AC07513F26D8A1A4840

I deleted the 11-18th character and it turned into a valid point.

from osgeo import ogr
from binascii import unhexlify

## converts a WKB string into a YX coordinate

input = raw_input("Enter WKB string: ")
wkb = unhexlify(input)
point = ogr.CreateGeometryFromWkb(wkb)
print "%.6f,%.6f" % (point.GetY(), point.GetX())

For some reason it had an SRID error/extra digits. Once I removed those 8 digits, then it gave me the proper YX

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