Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I've been building Spring MVC (3.2/4.0) controllers with validators for my web application along the lines of what I found in the Spring Petclinic sample application. However, in the example application, validators are created within the relevant controlllers using the new keyword, creating a tight coupling. Now that I'm writing tests to cover this code it is proving difficult to isolate these classes due to this coupling.

Is there a recommended way to decouple validators from controllers? Is there some other solution to this problem?

Here's an example from the Petclinic application of the tight coupling I mean:

@RequestMapping(value = "/owners/{ownerId}/pets/new", method = RequestMethod.POST)
public String processCreationForm(@ModelAttribute("pet") Pet pet, BindingResult result, SessionStatus status) {
    new PetValidator().validate(pet, result);
    if (result.hasErrors()) {
        return "pets/createOrUpdatePetForm";
    } else {
        this.clinicService.savePet(pet);
        status.setComplete();
        return "redirect:/owners/{ownerId}";
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Have a look at this stackoverflow.com/questions/12237159/… –  Mukus Dec 30 '13 at 14:00

3 Answers 3

Define Petvalidator as a bean in your application-context and make the following changes to your controller

@RequestMapping(value = "/owners/{ownerId}/pets/new", method = RequestMethod.POST)
public String processCreationForm(@ModelAttribute("pet") Pet pet, BindingResult result, SessionStatus status) {
    PetValidator petValidator;   //change this line
    petValidator.validate(pet,result);  //change this line

    if (result.hasErrors()) {
        return "pets/createOrUpdatePetForm";
    } else {
        this.clinicService.savePet(pet);
        status.setComplete();
        return "redirect:/owners/{ownerId}";
    }
}

And you can use property injection to inject the appropriate Petvalidator to your controller. If ur using component-scanning add the following to autowire the registered bean into your controller.

@Autowired
PetValidator petValidator;

Inside your controller istead of PetValidator petvalidator;

share|improve this answer

That's what @Validis for:

public String processCreationForm(@ModelAttribute("pet") @Valid Pet pet, BindingResult result, SessionStatus status) {
  if (result.hasErrors()) {

There's no need to do the validation yourself. Let Spring handle it automatically.

share|improve this answer
    
No it's not. @Valid enables JSR-303 bean validation. If his bean isn't annotated with constraints it will not work. –  Bart Dec 30 '13 at 17:34
    
@Bart Bean validation is enabled via the application context and the existence of an implementation in the classpath. @Valid just tells Spring to validate the annotated object. No @Valid, no automatic validation. Feel free to read the docs or the source code. –  zeroflagL Dec 30 '13 at 18:29

If your PetValidator is of type org.springframework.validation.Validator you could bind it using WebDataBinder.setValidator().

In your controller or @ControllerAdvice add a method annotated with @InitBinder.

@InitBinder
public void initBinder(WebDataBinder binder) {
    // Add the validator. Could be an auto wired instance as well.
    binder.setValidator(new PetValidator());
}

Now all objects of a type supported by your validator will be validated automatically.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.