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I'm trying to create a function that goes through an objects properties and multiplies the values by 2 if that value is a number.

I'm sure the var value is an integer but it's not applying the multiplication ? Where am I going wrong in this code ?

var menu = {
width: "200",  
height: "300",
title: "My menu"
};

function multiplyNumeric(menu) {

 for(var key in menu) {
    var value = menu[key];
    if( typeof value === 'number' ) {
        value = value * 2;

    }
 }

}

multiplyNumeric(menu);

alert(menu.width);
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6  
there is no number in menu. Because of the quotes, all your properties are strings. You could use parseInt or remove the quotes –  Paul D. Dec 30 '13 at 14:56
    
If you don't want to use parseInt use + as unary operator as var numberAsString= '5'; var stringAsNum = +numberAsString; –  Mozak Dec 30 '13 at 15:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Numbers (as well as strings and booleans) are passed by value. You're copying the value the a new variable where you're modifying it.

You need to modify the object's property directly:

for (var key in menu) {
  if (typeof menu[key] === 'number') {
    menu[key] *= 2;
  }
}

Also, JavaScript will not return "number" if you ask for typeof("200"); it will return "string". You need a numeric literal, not a string:

var menu = {
  width: 200,  
  height: 300,
  title: "My menu"
};
share|improve this answer
    
If those string should be valid, something like if( Number(menu[key])==menu[key] ) { menu[key] *=2; } could be used. This for sure would not work with +=. –  t.niese Dec 30 '13 at 15:05
    
@meagar I don't quite understand why the var value won't work here ? Shouldn't it transfer the altered data to the value going through the for in loop ? –  moonshineOutlaw Dec 30 '13 at 15:45
    
@moonshineOutlaw No, because you're copying the value to a new variable. If I do x = 1; y = x; y = y + 1, I'm not altering x at all. x is still 1, and y is now 2. This is a fundamental property of variables. When you assign one to another, you're assigning the value, not a reference to the variable. Note that, for objects, the value being assigned is a reference to the object (again, not a reference to the variable). –  meagar Dec 30 '13 at 17:59

Just change the those strings to numbers in your object:

var menu = {
  width: 200,  
  height: 300,
  title: "My menu"
};
share|improve this answer

edit your object as follow dont use quotes for number at your object

var menu = {
width:200,  
height:300,
title: "My menu"
};
share|improve this answer

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