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Given the following minimal example:

foo.hpp:

class foo {       
    public:       
        enum bar {
            ONE,  
            TWO,  
            THREE 
        };        
        bar b;    
        foo ();   
};          

foo.cpp:

#include "foo.hpp"       

foo::foo () : b(ONE) { } 

How can I do what I'm trying to do below?

#include "foo.hpp"        

int main () {             
    foo *f = new foo();   
/* None of these work:    
    f->b = TWO;           
    f->b = foo::bar::TWO; 
    f->b = bar::TWO;      
*/                        
    return 0;             
}                         

I'm leaning toward the conclusion that this is not idiomatic in C++ and I must wrap the enum with the class in an outer namespace, or otherwise reorganize. What are the options and/or best practice?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted
f->b = foo::TWO; 

should work

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To clarify: enum values are members of their enclosing namespace (which in this case, is the foo class), unless the enum is declared like enum class bar (in which case, they'd be named like foo::bar::TWO). –  cHao Dec 30 '13 at 16:12
    
Why I thought bar::TWO worth trying but not foo::TWO I dunno. Thanks. –  goldilocks Dec 30 '13 at 16:15
    
As far as I remember foo::bar::TWO would actually work under Visual Studio (at least 2005), while on GCC it does not - which is correct. –  brightstar Dec 30 '13 at 16:17

In C++ prior to C++11 enums (the enum name itself AND the values) are in the scope of the enclosing namespace/class.

So you would access it as: f->b = foo::TWO; (as seen in the other answer).

However you can utilize nested structs to make enum management a bit easier:

class foo {       
    public:       
        struct bar {
            enum Type {
            ONE,  
            TWO,  
            THREE  }
        };        
        bar::Type b;    
        foo ();   
};          

Now you can qualify the name with your struct helper.

#include "foo.hpp"        

int main () {             
    foo *f = new foo();   
    f->b = foo::bar::TWO; 

    return 0;             
}                         
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Enumerators are members of class. So you can write either as

f->b = foo::TWO;

or

f->b = f->TWO;

or even as

f->b = foo::bar::TWO;

provided that your compiler supports the C++ 2011 Standard

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