Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was wondering if there is a way to put objects of a class in a header?

For example:

class MyClass {

} object;  

If I made an object there and then include the header in more than one source file, I get an error of multiply defined symbols found. I am new so don't understand fully everything.

Also, I want to do something like object.function() inside of a different function which is a member of a different class how can I do that?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

Assuming you want a single object, in the header file just declare the object:

extern blabla object;

and then in one source file define it:

blabla object;

As for calling a method on an object from a different class, that is perfectly fine as long as the method is public.

class foo
{
public:
    void public_method();

private:
    void private_method();
};


void some_other_class::method(foo &f)
{
    f.public_method();  // this is fine

    f.private_method(); // this is not okay, private_method can only be called from
                        // within foo
}

There's also a third visibility (protected), which comes into play once you start dealing with inheritance.

share|improve this answer

You can find ways to do it (see the other answers), but just don't do it. As you said, you are new to C++, so better learn the good practices, and when you need global objects - create them in the source (cpp) file.

Besides it, try to avoid using global objects at all, and define your objects inside the classes or functions.

share|improve this answer

It's not a good practice to put definitions in header files as this would result to the error you encountered. Although there are ways to get around this (extern, header guard), it should be avoided as much as possible. Just remember, put declarations in header files, definitions in source files.

share|improve this answer

About your second question note you can also call a static method using the :: operator and the class name (without an instance) :

void AnOtherClass::method()
{
    TheFirstClass::static_method();
}
share|improve this answer

You could also make a use of the singleton pattern, if that fits your need in this case.

For your second question. You can always make a class object as a (private) member variable of the class you want to call object.function() from.

For example:

// File a.h, includeguards etc. left out for clarity
class A {
public:
   void func();
};

// File b.h
#include "a.h"
class B {
public:
   void func();
private:
   A object;
};

// File b.c
#include "b.h"
void B::func()
{
   object.func();
}

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
1  
I wouldn't recommend the singleton pattern at all; there are no cases in which it's required. –  GManNickG Jan 18 '10 at 7:47
    
Hmm, thanks - your comment made me do an extensive google search for pros and con arguments, after searching and reading many articles I found quite a good wiki discussion with many interesting comments and links: c2.com/cgi/wiki?SingletonPattern. My Conclusion: give it a very, very, good thought before you use it. But it sometimes does make sense. And you are right, it's not required anywhere - but so is no pattern. –  lx. Jan 21 '10 at 8:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.