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Does any standard "comes with batteries" method exist to clear the terminal screen from a python script, or do I have to go curses (the libraries, not the words) ?

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I'd say it's good (you can use clear for darwin as well, so you covered the 3 main platforms). I'm not aware of any function to accomplish this in standard library and calling a command is better than installing yet another package. –  Vlad H Jan 26 '11 at 17:49
    
I'm yet to see an entirely platform-independent screen - I guess this is really the best you can do. (However, I'd prefer my command line tools not to remove previous output, which I may like to keep!) –  delnan Jan 26 '11 at 17:49
    
@delnan: That's the thing. Assuming you're talking about linux, clear doesn't actually remove anything (at least on my terminal). It just redraws everything so that the cursor is at the top of the page. Try using "clear" and then scrolling up, your input should be there just as it was. –  Falmarri Jan 26 '11 at 17:51
    
@delnan: Well, you can always scroll up ;) . But the reason I am doing this is because I have to display lots of output and I don't want the user to scroll back up to read. –  user225312 Jan 26 '11 at 17:52
    
@Falmarri: Yes, as far as my limited limux knowledge goes at least. But it's annoying - I don't see the benefit. –  delnan Jan 26 '11 at 17:53

17 Answers 17

up vote 22 down vote accepted

What about escape sequences?

print chr(27) + "[2J"
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1  
this is according to ANSI. makes sense... –  Stefano Borini Jan 18 '10 at 7:44
12  
Note that this is not portable across all terminal types... not that you'll run into too many odd types these days... –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jan 18 '10 at 7:44
3  
This technique brings the cursor down. Try Ctrl+L, the effect is different. I think the script should reset the cursor location to the top of the line. –  Peter Feb 19 '13 at 13:15
    
This comment will clear the screen but not reset the cursor position. I wanted the cursor position reset as well. The answer provided by DaveKirby and edited by @tzot was exactly what I was looking for. –  Preston Jul 28 '13 at 1:05
2  
Or now, in Python3, print(chr(27) + "[2J") –  david.barkhuizen Jan 18 at 19:01

A simple and cross-platform solution would be to use either the cls command on Windows, or clear on Unix systems. Used with os.system, this makes a nice one-liner:

import os
os.system('cls' if os.name == 'nt' else 'clear')
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25  
os.system('cls' if os.name=='nt' else 'clear') –  Teddy Jan 18 '10 at 8:40
5  
Which one? I can understand Teddy's version without thinking. –  Tim Pietzcker Jan 18 '10 at 13:33
4  
Idan: Yes, but once you understand how the code works, you can see the potential in it and use it for a lot more things. –  poke Jan 18 '10 at 17:42
5  
@poke: A if C else B is preferred over (A, B)[C], especially if A and B include function calls, since only one case is evaluated (also, there's no unnecessary temporary tuple/list building). –  tzot Feb 20 '11 at 16:29
1  
@Maxime It ultimately results in the same and is indeed more pythonic. So yeah, it’s fine. –  poke Feb 3 at 14:09

If you are on a Linux/UNIX system then printing the ANSI escape sequence to clear the screen should do the job. You will also want to move cursor to the top of the screen. This will work on any terminal that supports ANSI.

import sys
sys.stderr.write("\x1b[2J\x1b[H")

This will not work on Windows unless ANSI support has been enabled. There may be an equivalent control sequence for Windows, but I do not know.

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2  
Since your answer implied that you're using Python 2.x, and since 2.x print (without softspace tuning and/or sys.stdout.flush()) can't ever leave the cursor at the top-left corner of the screen, I edited your answer to something that can be used in both Python 2.x and 3.x –  tzot Feb 20 '11 at 16:36
1  
For anyone wondering, the string is a series of ANSI escape codes. \x1b[ is a control sequence introducer (hex 0x1B). Code 2J clears the entire screen. Code H sets the cursor position, and without arguments defaults to the top left corner. –  Preston Jul 28 '13 at 0:57
1  
Can you explain why are you writing to stderr instead of stdout, please? –  Aaron Feb 11 at 23:40
    
I can confirm this works with the Linux programs screen and minicom. –  gbmhunter Feb 20 at 22:46
    
@Aaron My guess would be to prevent the output being buffered. Usually (it might even be in a standard) stderr output is determined to appear imediately. –  handuel Apr 7 at 16:21

You could try to rely on clear but it might not be available on all Linux distributions. On windows use cls as you mentionned.

import subprocess
import platform

def clear():
    subprocess.Popen( "cls" if platform.system() == "Windows" else "clear", shell=True)

clear()

Note: It could be considered bad form to take control of the terminal screen. Are you considering using an option? It would probably be better to let the user decide if he want to clear the screen.

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Why os.system? What is the advantage here? –  TryPyPy Jan 26 '11 at 18:01
    
@TryPyPy My mistake. subprocess is intented to replace os.system, I should be using it instead. OP was right. –  Rod Jan 26 '11 at 18:13
1  
I'd use subprocess.call() for something as simple as this call though. –  ThiefMaster Oct 28 '13 at 16:03

You could tear through the terminfo database, but the functions for doing so are in curses anyway.

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you can make your own. this will not be dependent on your terminal, or OS type.

def clear(num):
    for i in range(num): print 

clear(80)
print "hello"
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1  
... You don't need the empty string literal there. ... What? I'm trying to stay positive here! –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jan 18 '10 at 8:05
    
you are pedantic, but i will give it to you –  ghostdog74 Jan 18 '10 at 8:55

If all you need is to clear the screen, this is probably good enough. The problem is there's not even a 100% cross platform way of doing this across linux versions. The problem is the implementations of the terminal all support slightly different things. I'm fairly sure that "clear" will work everywhere. But the more "complete" answer is to use the xterm control characters to move the cursor, but that requires xterm in and of itself.

Without knowing more of your problem, your solution seems good enough.

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A perhaps cheesy way to clear the screen, but one that will work on any platform I know of, is as follows:

for i in xrange(0,100):
    print ""
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It will leave the cursor at the end of the window. It also leaves the possibility to scroll back to what was previously there. Might be a good thing or not. Also, you might want to put a greater number since some user could be using more than 100 lines...;) –  Rod Jan 26 '11 at 18:32
3  
You could also write print ('\n' * 100) which will work in Python 2.x and 3.x while being faster. –  Noctis Skytower May 30 '12 at 15:17

As a wise person once posted, for at least Linux, you can do the Python equivalent of this, which you can use on the command-line. It will clear the screen more than the Linux clear command (such that you can't scroll up to see your text):

printf "\033c"

For Windows you can just use

cls

Here's a Python way to do it:

import subprocess;
subprocess.call(["printf", "'\033c'"]);

Here's another Python way to do it (that works on at least my computer):

print("\033c");

I have no idea if that works in Windows or on Mac, iOS, Android, etc., though.

You can use the other people's answers to figure out a more cross-platform way to implement this.

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This will clear 25 new lines:

def clear():
    print(' \n' * 25)

clear()

I use eclipse with pydev. I like the newline solution better than the for num in range . The for loop throws warnings, while the print newline doesn't. If you want to specify the number of newlines in the clear statement try this variation.

def clear(j):
    print(' \n' * j)

clear(25)
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python -c "from os import system; system('clear')"

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1  
Please, no. Thats terrible. –  Yann Ramin Jan 18 '10 at 7:41
1  
well, it works. A bit aggressive though. –  Stefano Borini Jan 18 '10 at 7:43
1  
system('clear') is terrible? I disagree. –  Nick Dandoulakis Jan 18 '10 at 7:43
3  
support.microsoft.com/kb/99261 - it's less terrible than win32api :) –  gridzbi Jan 18 '10 at 8:44

this works on all platforms and it should work in python 2 and 3 I know it works in 2 though

def clear(number ):
for i in range(900):
    print(" ")

then to clear just type clear()

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This function works in gnome-terminal because, by default, it recognizes ANSI escape sequences. It gives you a CLEAN PROMPT rows_max distance from the bottom of the terminal, but also precisely from where it was called. Gives you complete control over how much to clear.

def clear(rows=-1, rows_max=None, *, calling_line=True, absolute=None,
          store_max=[]):
    """clear(rows=-1, rows_max=None)
clear(0, -1) # Restore auto-determining rows_max
clear(calling_line=False) # Don't clear calling line
clear(absolute=5) # Absolutely clear out to 5 rows up"""
    from os import linesep
    if rows_max and rows_max != -1:
        store_max[:] = [rows_max, False]
    elif not store_max or store_max[1] or rows_max == -1 or absolute:
        try:
            from shutil import get_terminal_size
            columns_max, rows_max = get_terminal_size()
        except ImportError:
            columns_max, rows_max = 80, 24
        if absolute is None:
            store_max[:] = [rows_max, True]
    if store_max:
        if rows == -1:
            rows = store_max[0]
        elif isinstance(rows, float):
            rows = round(store_max[0] * rows)
        if rows > store_max[0] - 2:
            rows = store_max[0] - 2
    if absolute is None:
        s = ('\033[1A' + ' ' * 30 if calling_line else '') + linesep * rows
    else:
        s = '\033[{}A'.format(absolute + 2) + linesep
        if absolute > rows_max - 2:
            absolute = rows_max - 2
        s += (' ' * columns_max + linesep) * absolute + ' ' * columns_max
        rows = absolute
    print(s + '\033[{}A'.format(rows + 1))

Implementation:

clear() # Clear all, TRIES to automatically get terminal height
clear(800, 24) # Clear all, set 24 as terminal (max) height
clear(12) # Clear half of terminal below if 24 is its height
clear(1000) # Clear to terminal height - 2 (24 - 2)
clear(0.5) # float factor 0.0 - 1.0 of terminal height (0.5 * 24 = 12)
clear() # Clear to rows_max - 2 of user given rows_max (24 - 2)
clear(0, 14) # Clear line, reset rows_max to half of 24 (14-2)
clear(0) # Just clear the line
clear(0, -1) # Clear line, restore auto-determining rows_max
clear(calling_line=False) # Clear all, don't clear calling line
clear(absolute=5) # Absolutely clear out to 5 rows up

Parameters: rows is the number of clear text rows to add between prompt and bottom of terminal, pushing everything up. rows_max is the height of the terminal (or max clearing height) in text rows, and only needs to be set once, but can be reset at any time. *, in the third parameter position means all following parameters are keyword only (e.g., clear(absolute=5)). calling_line=True (default) works better in Interactive mode. calling_line=False works better for text-based, terminal applications. absolute was added to try to fix glitchy gap problems in Interactive mode after reducing size of terminal, but can also be used for terminal applications. store_max is just for secret, "persistent" storage of rows_max value; don't explicitly use this parameter. (When an argument is not passed for store_max, changing the list contents of store_max changes this parameter's default value. Hence, persistent storage.)

Portability: Sorry, this doesn't work in IDLE, but it works >> VERY COOL << in Interactive mode in a terminal (console) that recognizes ANSI escape sequences. I only tested this in Ubuntu 13.10 using Python 3.3 in gnome-terminal. So I can only assume portability is dependant upon Python 3.3 (for the shutil.get_terminal_size() function for BEST results) and ANSI recognition. The print(...) function is Python 3. I also tested this with a simple, text-based, terminal Tic Tac Toe game (application).

For use in Interactive mode: First copy and paste the copy(...) function in Interactive mode and see if it works for you. If so, then put the above function into a file named clear.py . In the terminal start python, with 'python3'. Enter:

>>> import sys
>>> sys.path
['', '/usr/lib/python3.3', ...

Now drop the clear.py file into one of the path directories listed so that Python can find it (don't overwrite any existing files). To easily use from now on:

>>> from clear import clear
>>> clear()
>>> print(clear.__doc__)
clear(rows=-1, rows_max=None)
clear(0, -1) # Restore auto-determining rows_max
clear(calling_line=False) # Don't clear calling line
clear(absolute=5) # Absolutely clear out to 5 rows up

For use in a terminal application: Put the copy(...) function into a file named clear.py in the same folder with your main.py file. Here is a working abstract (skeleton) example from a Tic Tac Toe game application (run from terminal prompt: python3 tictactoe.py):

from os import linesep

class TicTacToe:    
    def __init__(self):
        # Clear screen, but not calling line
        try:
            from clear import clear
            self.clear = clear
            self.clear(calling_line=False)
        except ImportError:
            self.clear = False
        self.rows = 0    # Track printed lines to clear

        # ...
        self.moves = [' '] * 9

    def do_print(self, *text, end=linesep):
        text = list(text)
        for i, v in enumerate(text[:]):
            text[i] = str(v)
        text = ' '.join(text)
        print(text, end=end)
        self.rows += text.count(linesep) + 1

    def show_board(self):
        if self.clear and self.rows:
            self.clear(absolute=self.rows)
        self.rows = 0
        self.do_print('Tic Tac Toe')
        self.do_print('''   |   |
 {6} | {7} | {8}
   |   |
-----------
   |   |
 {3} | {4} | {5}
   |   |
-----------
   |   |
 {0} | {1} | {2}
   |   |'''.format(*self.moves))

    def start(self):
        self.show_board()
        ok = input("Press <Enter> to continue...")
        self.moves = ['O', 'X'] * 4 + ['O']
        self.show_board()
        ok = input("Press <Enter> to close.")

if __name__ == "__main__":
    TicTacToe().start()

Explanation: do_print(...) on line 19 is a version of print(...) needed to keep track of how many new lines have been printed (self.rows). Otherwise, you would have to self.rows += 1 all over the place where print(...) is called throughout the entire program. So each time the board is redrawn by calling show_board() the previous board is cleared out and the new board is printed exactly where it should be. Notice self.clear(calling_line=False) on line 9 basically pushes everything up RELATIVE to the bottom of the terminal, but does not clear the original calling line. In contrast, self.clear(absolute=self.rows) on line 29 absolutely clears out everything self.rows distance upward, rather than just pushing everything upward relative to the bottom of the terminal.

Ubuntu users with Python 3.3: Put #!/usr/bin/env python3 on the very first line of the tictactoe.py file. Right click on the tictactoe.py file => Properties => Permissions tab => Check Execute: Allow executing file as program. Double click on the file => Click Run in Terminal button. If an open terminal's current directory is that of the tictactoe.py file, you can also start the file with ./tictactoe.py.

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A Pure Python solution.
Does not rely on either ANSI, or external commands.
Only your terminal has to have the ability to tell you how many lines are in view.

from shutil import get_terminal_size
print("\n" * get_terminal_size().lines, end='')

Python version >= 3.3.0

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I would do it in this way to make it look more like bash:

Just create a file named .pythonstartup at Home directory and use poke's answer in a function

On Linux:

echo "from subprocess import call
def clear(int=None):  
    call('clear')
    if int == 0:
       exit()
clear()" >> $HOME/.pythonstartup ; export PYTHONSTARTUP=$HOME/.pythonstartup ; python

You can add "export PYTHONSTARTUP=$HOME/.pythonstartup" to your ./bashrc file

Since what I care about is space; a call to the function will not display the python interpreter description at startup, but you can remove "clear()" to retain it.

Using it like a normal function should do the trick without printing the exit status:

clear()

If you pass the argument 0 to the function it will clear the screen and exit successfully so you can continue using the shell in a clean screen

clear(0)

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For windows, on the interpreter COMMAND LINE ONLY (NOT THE GUI)!!! Simply type: (Remember to use proper indentation with python):

import os
def clear():
    os.system('cls')

Every time you type clear() on the shell (COMMAND LINE), it will clear the screen on your shell. If you exit the shell, then you must redo the above to do it again as you open a new python (COMMAND LINE) shell. (Note: Does not matter what version of Python you are using, explicitly (2.5, 2.7, 3.3 & 3.4).

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By default, os.system("clear")/os.system("cls") will return an int type as 0. We can completely clear the screen by assigning it to a variable and deleting that.

def clear():
    if (os.name == 'nt'):    
        c = os.system('cls')
    else:
        c = os.system('clear')
    del c  # can also omit c totally

#clear()
share|improve this answer
    
duplicate of answer given more than 2 years ago... longer and less elegent. See @poke answer with most votes for this question –  Joop Aug 8 '13 at 15:20

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