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I have two nested lists:

ls1 = [["a","b"], ["c","d"]]
ls2 = [["e","f"], ["g","h"]]

and I'd like the following result [(a,e), (b,f), (c,g), (d,h)]

I've tried zip(a,b), how do I zip nested lists into a list with tupled pairs?

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4 Answers 4

You can also use itertools.chain.from_iterable and zip:

>>> ls1 = [["a","b"], ["c","d"]]
>>> ls2 = [["e","f"], ["g","h"]]
>>> 
>>> zip(itertools.chain.from_iterable(ls1), itertools.chain.from_iterable(ls2))
[('a', 'e'), ('b', 'f'), ('c', 'g'), ('d', 'h')]
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Good, but readability would be improved by using itertools.chain over itertools.chain.from_iterable. (And yes, I know the from_iterable version is faster.) –  Steven Rumbalski Dec 30 '13 at 19:26
    
@StevenRumbalski, or cfi = itertools.chain.from_iterable ;) –  Maciej Gol Dec 30 '13 at 19:36

You need to flatten your lists, and could use reduce:

from functools import reduce # in Python 3.x
from operator import add
zip(reduce(add, ls1), reduce(add, ls2))
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Note that if your lists are very long this will bog down quickly from the repeated creation of new lists for each addition. –  Steven Rumbalski Dec 30 '13 at 19:29

You can use zip twice inside a list comprehension:

>>> ls1 = [["a","b"], ["c","d"]]
>>> ls2 = [["e","f"], ["g","h"]]
>>> [y for x in zip(ls1, ls2) for y in zip(*x)]
[('a', 'e'), ('b', 'f'), ('c', 'g'), ('d', 'h')]
>>>
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An idiomatic method is to use the star notation and itertools.chain to flatten the lists before zipping them. The star notation unpacks an iterable into arguments to a function, while the itertools.chain function chains the iterables in its arguments together into a single iterable.



    ls1 = [["a","b"], ["c","d"]]
    ls2 = [["e","f"], ["g","h"]]

    import itertools as it
    zip(it.chain(*ls1), it.chain(*ls2))

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