Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Facing this problem all the time but couldn't really figure out how to overcome with it;

It is related with the user entry - in case the user enters something wrong I want the program to continue or reask the question;

an example ;

  • I want the user to enter the age
  • when the user enters the age correctly I want the program to continue (but in below code it asks 5 times
  • if the user enters a wrong entry (i.e string) I want the program to reask to enter the age

Vm appreciate to hearing your kind assitance

for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
        {
            int _Age;
            Console.Write ("Please enter your age :") 
            string AgeEntry = Console.ReadLine();
            bool AgeCheck = Int32.TryParse(AgeEntry, out _Age);
            if (!AgeCheck)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Please enter your age : ");
            }
            else
            {
                i--;
            continue;

            }


        }
share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by asawyer, JDB, jonrsharpe, LarsTech, vitaut Dec 30 '13 at 23:25

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – JDB, jonrsharpe, LarsTech, vitaut
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Look up the while keyword. – mbeckish Dec 30 '13 at 19:25
    
How do you define user enters a wrong entry? Is it only for getting an integer or you have an exact number in your mind. – Soner Gönül Dec 30 '13 at 19:26
    
Based on the Int32.TryParse, I assume OP is looking for an integer. – Mike Devenney Dec 30 '13 at 19:33
up vote 0 down vote accepted

infinite loop, just issue a "break;" and it will drop out....

    int _Age;

    while( true )
    {

        Console.Write ("Please enter your age :") 
        string AgeEntry = Console.ReadLine();
        bool AgeCheck = Int32.TryParse(AgeEntry, out _Age);

        if ( AgeCheck == true ) {  break; }

    }
share|improve this answer
int age = 0;

while (true)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Please enter your age:");
    string entry = Console.ReadLine();
    if (int.TryParse(entry, out age)) break;
}

The idea is simply to run an "infinite" loop until a valid age is entered, at which point we break out of the loop.

share|improve this answer

Instead of the infinite loops:

int age = 0;
do
{
    Console.WriteLine("Please enter your age:");
    string entry = Console.ReadLine();
} while (!int.TryParse(entry, out age));

Nothing wrong with the infinite loop inherently. I just think it's cleaner without.

share|improve this answer

Answer to your question about the question being asked 5 times. You have a for loop that will spin through the code 5 times regardless of the answer the user gives.

for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) 
{ your code is here }

In the code below, after the do loop, you'll have the input from the console in the answer variable and the parsed int in the age variable. You can create a new console app in VS and paste this into Program.cs and run it to test.

using System;

namespace console {
    internal class Program {
        private static void Main( string[] args ) {
            int age;
            string answer;

            do {
                Console.Clear();
                Console.Write( "Please enter your age: " );
                answer = Console.ReadLine();
            } while ( !int.TryParse( answer, out age ) );

            Console.WriteLine( string.Empty );
            Console.WriteLine( "Thanks, let's continue..." );
            Console.Read();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.