Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am trying to scale websites on Widows Azure. So far I‘ve tested Wordpress, Ghost (Blog) and a plain HTML site and it’s all the same: If I scale them up (add instances), they don’t get any faster. I am sure I must do something wrong… This is what I did:

  1. I created a new shared website, with a plain HTML Bootstrap template on it. http://demobootstrapsite.azurewebsites.net/
  2. Then I installed ab.exe from the Apache Project on a hosted bare metal server (4 Cores, 12 GB RAM, 100 MBit)

I ran the test two times. The first time with a single shared instance and the second time with two shared instances using this command:

ab.exe -n 10000 -c 100 http://demobootstrapsite.azurewebsites.net/

This means ab.exe is going to create 10000 requests with 100 parallel threads.

I expected the response times of the test with two shared instances to be significantly lower than the response times with just one shared instance. But the mean time per request even rised a bit from 1452.519 ms with one shared instance to 1460.631 ms with two shared instances. Later I even ran the site on 8 shared instances with no effect at all. My first thought was that maybe the shared instances are the problem. So I put the site on a standard VM and ran the test again. But the problems remain the same. Also adding more instances didn’t make the site any faster (even a bit slower).

Later I‘ve whatched a Video with Scott Hanselman and Stefan Schackow in which they‘ve explained the Azure Scaling features. Stefan says that Azure has a kind of „sticky loadbalancing“ which will redirect a client always to the same instance/VM to avoid compatibility problems with statefull applications. So I‘ve checked the WebServer logs and I found a Logfile for every instance with about the same size. Usually that means that every instance was used during the test..

PS: During the test run I‘ve checked the response time oft the website from my local computer (from a different network than the server) and the response times were about 1.5s.

Here are the test results:

###################################### 
1 instance result
###################################### 

PS C:\abtest> .\ab.exe -n 10000 -c 100 http://demobootstrapsite.azurewebsites.net/
This is ApacheBench, Version 2.3 <$Revision: 1528965 $>
Copyright 1996 Adam Twiss, Zeus Technology Ltd, http://www.zeustech.net/
Licensed to The Apache Software Foundation, http://www.apache.org/

Benchmarking demobootstrapsite.azurewebsites.net (be patient)
Finished 10000 requests


Server Software:        Microsoft-IIS/8.0
Server Hostname:        demobootstrapsite.azurewebsites.net
Server Port:            80

Document Path:          /
Document Length:        16396 bytes

Concurrency Level:      100
Time taken for tests:   145.252 seconds
Complete requests:      10000
Failed requests:        0
Total transferred:      168800000 bytes
HTML transferred:       163960000 bytes
Requests per second:    68.85 [#/sec] (mean)
Time per request:       1452.519 [ms] (mean)
Time per request:       14.525 [ms] (mean, across all concurrent requests)
Transfer rate:          1134.88 [Kbytes/sec] received

Connection Times (ms)
              min  mean[+/-sd] median   max
Connect:        0   14   8.1     16      78
Processing:    47 1430  93.9   1435    1622
Waiting:       16  705 399.3    702    1544
Total:         62 1445  94.1   1451    1638

Percentage of the requests served within a certain time (ms)
  50%   1451
  66%   1466
  75%   1482
  80%   1498
  90%   1513
  95%   1529
  98%   1544
  99%   1560
 100%   1638 (longest request)

###################################### 
2 instances result
###################################### 

PS C:\abtest> .\ab.exe -n 10000 -c 100 http://demobootstrapsite.azurewebsites.net/
This is ApacheBench, Version 2.3 <$Revision: 1528965 $>
Copyright 1996 Adam Twiss, Zeus Technology Ltd, http://www.zeustech.net/
Licensed to The Apache Software Foundation, http://www.apache.org/

Benchmarking demobootstrapsite.azurewebsites.net (be patient)
Finished 10000 requests


Server Software:        Microsoft-IIS/8.0
Server Hostname:        demobootstrapsite.azurewebsites.net
Server Port:            80

Document Path:          /
Document Length:        16396 bytes

Concurrency Level:      100
Time taken for tests:   146.063 seconds
Complete requests:      10000
Failed requests:        0
Total transferred:      168800046 bytes
HTML transferred:       163960000 bytes
Requests per second:    68.46 [#/sec] (mean)
Time per request:       1460.631 [ms] (mean)
Time per request:       14.606 [ms] (mean, across all concurrent requests)
Transfer rate:          1128.58 [Kbytes/sec] received

Connection Times (ms)
              min  mean[+/-sd] median   max
Connect:        0   14   8.1     16      78
Processing:    31 1439  92.8   1451    1607
Waiting:       16  712 402.5    702    1529
Total:         47 1453  92.9   1466    1622

Percentage of the requests served within a certain time (ms)
  50%   1466
  66%   1482
  75%   1482
  80%   1498
  90%   1513
  95%   1529
  98%   1544
  99%   1560
 100%   1622 (longest request)
share|improve this question
2  
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about application hosting and not development –  Mark Dec 30 '13 at 22:58
    
The Microsoft support site said that Stackoverflow is great places to get online help for Windows Azure :) windowsazure.com/en-us/support/forums But, yes maybe you are right. The reson why I posted it here was, I am currently developing a web app and I was wondering why it does not scale. –  Oliver Dec 31 '13 at 12:02
    
Have you tried running multiple copies of ab in parallel? Instead of a single ab -n 10000 -c 100 you could do two cmd windows or better yet two separate machines running an -n 5000 -c 50. Dividing it when further might be interesting if this shows some difference. –  Kyle Hodgson Jan 4 '14 at 13:38
2  
Offtopic: Running Wordpress on distributed high-end hardware is like feeding a moped with premium gasoline. D: –  Cedric Reichenbach Jan 6 '14 at 11:28
    
@CedricReichenbach Right. Thats why I run this tests with a simple HTML Site. With Wordpress, the SQL connection would be the bottleneck... –  Oliver Jan 6 '14 at 19:13

6 Answers 6

"Scaling" the website in terms of resources adds more capacity to accept more requests, and won't increase the speed at which a single capacity instance can perform when not overloaded.

For example; assume a Small VM can accept 100 requests per second, processing each request at 1000ms, (and if it was 101 requests per second, each request would start to slow down to say 1500ms) then scaling to more Small VMs won't increase the speed at which a single request can be processed, it just raises us to accepting 200 requests per second under 1000ms each (as now both machines are not overloaded).

For per-request performance; the code itself (and CPU performance of the Azure VM) will impact how quickly a single request can be executed.

share|improve this answer
    
Thats exactly what I was wondering about: 1 VM is able to handle 68.85 requests per second, 2 VM's can handle 68.46 requests per second. I is not only the reponse times, also the rq/s din't improve. –  Oliver Jan 1 '14 at 15:09
1  
You tested it from one single point (your computer), correct? I guess there's the real limit. You might want to look into distributed testing. –  Cedric Reichenbach Jan 6 '14 at 11:24
1  
@Oliver be aware that if you used keep-alives during your testing, you probably remained connected to a single VM instance. Turn off HTTP keep-alives during your test, or use a better load testing service like the free (and pretty rad) loader.io site If you add it via Azure's Management Portal Add-Ons you get some extra stuff for free too. –  Andrew Jan 6 '14 at 18:28
    
@CedricReichenbach I tested it also via the Team Foundation Cloud-based Load Testing, to verify it. blogs.msdn.com/b/visualstudioalm/archive/2013/06/03/… –  Oliver Jan 6 '14 at 19:10
1  
I agree with @Andrew, it looks like you are expecting faster response times. You aren't scaling up you are scaling out. The real test would be to increase requests on one instance until you see unacceptable response times and then introduce the second instance to see if the situation improves. You aren't throwing enough requests, 1.6 seconds is hardly glacial for the absolute slowest request. –  ShaunUK Jan 8 '14 at 17:51

Given the complete absence in the question of the most important detail of such a test, it sounds to me you are merely testing your Internet connection bandwidth. 10 Mb/sec is a very common rate.

No, it doesn't scale.

share|improve this answer
    
Please help me. What is the most important detail of a load test? To avoid bandwidth problems I've tested it on a hosted server with an 100 Mbit internet conection. I was not sure if the server connection is sufficient. So I ran further tests with Windows Azure Load Tests, and these tests showed the same result. –  Oliver Jan 2 '14 at 11:41
1  
Identifying the bottleneck is the most important detail. You have pretty good (untested) evidence that Azure doesn't have this problem so be sure to factor in other explanations. Network bandwidth is certainly a good candidate, learn more about the hardware and infrastructure. Talk to your LAN admin and your ISP, they should know these details. –  Hans Passant Jan 2 '14 at 11:47
    
I am currently out of explanations for this problem. Thats why I posted it here. I also can't believe that is really a problem with Windows Azure. So I did another test with the Cloud-based Load Testing with Team Foundation Service (blogs.msdn.com/b/visualstudioalm/archive/2013/06/03/…). These test run directly on Windows Azure, so my ISP infrastructure should not be a problem. But this tests showed the same result as the tests I posted above. This is not about Azure bashing, I just want to make this work for me. –  Oliver Jan 2 '14 at 12:04
    
If you're running into bandwidth constraints, you might want to try loader.io I've had a lot of success with them. –  Homer6 Jan 8 '14 at 21:55

I usually run logparser against the iis logs that were generated at the time of the load test and calculate the RPS and latency (time-taken field) off that. This helps isolate the slowness from network, to server processing to actual load test tool reporting.

share|improve this answer
    
I did not use logparser, but I looked at the logs to find out if really both VM got hit. The response times in the IIS logs looked reasonable to me (+- 5% to what ab test said) –  Oliver Jan 7 '14 at 15:22
2  
response time will remain the same when scaling out, as request execution will take same amount of time on every VM. Scale out will handle more requests/sec with same response time per request. For improved response time scale up will help. You can compare the response time per request with shard mode VM and Standard mode VM for the same application. –  Apurva Jan 7 '14 at 19:58
    
Few things to keep in mind is that shared VMs have quota enforcements. After too high load your site will be throttled and will start being redirected to default page, which will be 302 response and it will skew the response time numbers. So you should really parse out the comparison per specific page(s). Static file contents will be cached in different places from client to server and has huge impact on response times. getting sites throttled and restarted in middle of a test will skew the response times because of cold start activation on 1st request. –  Apurva Jan 7 '14 at 20:05
    
Try running similar test with specific page(s), possibly dynamic contact and with standard VMs. This will help isolate further. –  Apurva Jan 7 '14 at 20:05

Before you load test the websites, you should do a baseline test with a single instance, say with 10 concurrent threads, to check how the website handles when not under load. Then use this base line to understand how the websites behave under load.

For example, if the baseline shows the website responds in 1.5s to requests when not under load, and again with 1.5s under load, then this means the website is able to handle the load easily. If under load the website takes 3-4s using a single instance, then this means it doesn't handle the load so well - try to add another instance and check if the response time improves.

share|improve this answer
    
I did a baseline test with 10 concurrent threads: The average response time was 200ms and 50 requests per second. When I run the test with more concurrent threads on a single VM, the web server starts to queue the requets and the response times get slower. (e.g. up to 1452ms mean response time with 100 threads). But don't get better when I add a second VM. Even the requets per second don't get better. When a single VM can handle 50 / 60 rq/s, 2 VM's should handle about 100 rq/s but like the test results show, 2 VM's also just handle 60 rq/s. –  Oliver Jan 1 '14 at 15:39
    
@Oliver: add these baseline numbers to the question. It'd also be good to see response times as you increase this load. Perhaps there's a point where 2 VMs does much better than 1, but then when you reach 100 threads it's too much for 2 VMs and you're seeing the same response times as 1 VM with 50 threads. –  Rory Jan 8 '14 at 21:41

Some ideas:

  • Is Azure throttling to prevent a DOS attack? You are making a hell of a lot of requests from one location to a single page.
  • Try Small sized Web Sites rather than shared. Capacity and Scaling might be quite different. Load of 50 requests/sec doesn't seem terrible for a shared service.
  • Try to identify where that time is going. 1.4s is a really long time.
  • Run load tests from several different machines simultaneously, to determine if there's throttling going on or you're affected by sticky load balancing or other network artefacts.
  • You said it's ok under load of about 10 concurrent requests at 50 requests/second. Gradually increase the load you're putting on the server to determine the point at which it starts to choke. Do this across multiple machines too.
  • Can you log on to Web Sites? Probably not ... see if you can replicate the same issues on a Cloud Service Web Role and analyze from there using Performance Monitor and typical IIS tools to see where the bottleneck is, or if it's even on the machine versus Azure network infrastructure.
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.