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I'm running a simple query with a join, similar to

SELECT t1.a, t2.b FROM t1 LEFT JOIN t2 ON ... LIMIT 5

As t1 has-many rows in t2 ( any number above 2 ) the LIMIT statement does not return the first 5 rows from t1 and corresponding entries from t2, but 5 rows which usually include 2-3 rows from t1.

How can I write this query to get the first 5 rows from t1 and the corresponding entries from t2?


Using MySQL 5.0.45.

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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted
SELECT t3.a, t2.b FROM (SELECT * FROM t1 LIMIT 5) t3
LEFT JOIN t2 ON ...

Note that if you use limit without an 'order by' clause, it is not defined which 5 rows you will get. Consider adding an 'order by' clause if this is not what you want.

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Please note, this solution has scalability issues with MySQL, as well as not working if he desires to ORDER BY a field in t2. –  hobodave Jan 18 '10 at 9:24
    
@hobodave Luckily, I ORDER BY a field in t1. –  Robert Munteanu Jan 18 '10 at 14:55
    
@Robert: You might find that you need to apply the ORDER BY twice - once inside the inner query to select the first five rows, and then again in the outer query to ensure the results are returned in the same order. –  Mark Byers Jan 18 '10 at 15:01
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This is a classic pagination query. I suggest breaking it down into two queries:

SELECT DISTINCT t1.id FROM t1 LEFT JOIN t2 ON ... LIMIT 5

Take these id's and place them in the following query:

SELECT t1.a, t2.b FROM t1 LEFT JOIN t2 ON ... WHERE t1.id IN (?,?,?,?,?) 
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Thanks for the answer. A 1-query solution is preferrable, and has been provided. –  Robert Munteanu Jan 18 '10 at 9:20
    
np, just be aware of the performance implications of the derived table solution as well as the SELECT *. –  hobodave Jan 18 '10 at 9:21
    
That's a good point as well. Right now the derived table needs to look at ~8k rows, and it's fast enough. Also, I wont' use SELECT *. –  Robert Munteanu Jan 18 '10 at 9:23
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I believe the following will do the trick:

SELECT t1.a, (SELECT t2.b FROM t2 WHERE t2... = t1...) AS b FROM t1 LIMIT 5
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Thanks for the answer. As there are multiple entries in t2 corresponding to t1, I get ERROR 1242 (21000): Subquery returns more than 1 row. –  Robert Munteanu Jan 18 '10 at 9:22
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You can group it by the unique column in t1:

SELECT * FROM t1 JOIN t2 ON ... GROUP BY t1.id LIMIT 5

But do you need the t2 table to be in a specific order?

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Thanks for the answer. Please look at my question, I need more than 5 rows returned, it's 10+ rows from t2 coupled with exactly 5 rows from t1. The accepted answer has a good solution. hobodave's one also works. –  Robert Munteanu Jan 18 '10 at 14:53
    
ah yes - makes sense, didn't read the question properly. Accepted answer works well. You could also do it with variables that count the unique rows but that gets messy. –  Timothy Jan 19 '10 at 11:20
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