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Is it possible to search every field of every table for a particular value in Oracle?

There are hundreds of tables with thousands of rows in some tables so I know this could take a very long time to query. But the only thing I know is that a value for the field I would like to query against is 1/22/2008P09RR8. <

I've tried using this statement below to find an appropriate column based on what I think it should be named but it returned no results.

SELECT * from dba_objects 
WHERE object_name like '%DTN%'

There is absolutely no documentation on this database and I have no idea where this field is being pulled from.

Any thoughts?

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Can we do this using a single query instead of using a stored procedure? –  Freakyuser Dec 23 '13 at 7:37
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11 Answers

up vote 36 down vote accepted

Quote:

I've tried using this statement below to find an appropriate column based on what I think it should be named but it returned no results.*

SELECT * from dba_objects WHERE
object_name like '%DTN%'

A column isn't an object. If you mean that you expect the column name to be like '%DTN%', the query you want is:

SELECT owner, table_name, column_name FROM all_tab_columns WHERE column_name LIKE '%DTN%';

But if the 'DTN' string is just a guess on your part, that probably won't help.

By the way, how certain are you that '1/22/2008P09RR8' is a value selected directly from a single column? If you don't know at all where it is coming from, it could be a concatenation of several columns, or the result of some function, or a value sitting in a nested table object. So you might be on a wild goose chase trying to check every column for that value. Can you not start with whatever client application is displaying this value and try to figure out what query it is using to obtain it?

Anyway, diciu's answer gives one method of generating SQL queries to check every column of every table for the value. You can also do similar stuff entirely in one SQL session using a PL/SQL block and dynamic SQL. Here's some hastily-written code for that:

    SET SERVEROUTPUT ON SIZE 100000

    DECLARE
      match_count INTEGER;
    BEGIN
      FOR t IN (SELECT owner, table_name, column_name
                  FROM all_tab_columns
                  WHERE owner <> 'SYS' and data_type LIKE '%CHAR%') LOOP

        EXECUTE IMMEDIATE
          'SELECT COUNT(*) FROM ' || t.owner || '.' || t.table_name ||
          ' WHERE '||t.column_name||' = :1'
          INTO match_count
          USING '1/22/2008P09RR8';

        IF match_count > 0 THEN
          dbms_output.put_line( t.table_name ||' '||t.column_name||' '||match_count );
        END IF;

      END LOOP;

    END;
    /

There are some ways you could make it more efficient too.

In this case, given the value you are looking for, you can clearly eliminate any column that is of NUMBER or DATE type, which would reduce the number of queries. Maybe even restrict it to columns where type is like '%CHAR%'.

Instead of one query per column, you could build one query per table like this:

SELECT * FROM table1
  WHERE column1 = 'value'
     OR column2 = 'value'
     OR column3 = 'value'
     ...
     ;
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This worked great. A little slow, but that was expected. –  Chris Conway Nov 12 '08 at 20:20
    
You should restrict it to char, varchar and varchar2 columns, since number and date columns cannot possibly contain that string. –  ammoQ Nov 10 '09 at 18:54
2  
@ammoQ -- like I said in the second-to-last paragraph? –  Dave Costa Nov 11 '09 at 16:31
    
I ran this on 9i and I get column_name unknown error. Can someone tell me what modification will be required to run this on 9i? –  Regmi May 4 '12 at 0:23
    
@Regmi -- sorry, that was actually a mistake in my code, not a version issue. The loop should have been driven by all_tab_columns not all_tables. I've fixed it. –  Dave Costa May 4 '12 at 12:08
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I did some modification to the above code to make it work faster if you are searching in only one owner. You just have to change the 3 variables v_owner, v_data_type and v_search_string to fit what you are searching for.

SET SERVEROUTPUT ON SIZE 100000

DECLARE
  match_count INTEGER;
-- Type the owner of the tables you are looking at
  v_owner VARCHAR2(255) :='ENTER_USERNAME_HERE';

-- Type the data type you are look at (in CAPITAL)
-- VARCHAR2, NUMBER, etc.
  v_data_type VARCHAR2(255) :='VARCHAR2';

-- Type the string you are looking at
  v_search_string VARCHAR2(4000) :='string to search here...';

BEGIN
  FOR t IN (SELECT table_name, column_name FROM all_tab_cols where owner=v_owner and data_type = v_data_type) LOOP

    EXECUTE IMMEDIATE 
    'SELECT COUNT(*) FROM '||t.table_name||' WHERE '||t.column_name||' = :1'
    INTO match_count
    USING v_search_string;

    IF match_count > 0 THEN
      dbms_output.put_line( t.table_name ||' '||t.column_name||' '||match_count );
    END IF;

  END LOOP;
END;
/
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Yes you can and your DBA will hate you and will find you to nail your shoes to the floor because that will cause lots of I/O and bring the database performance really down as the cache purges.

select column_name from all_tab_columns c, user_all_tables u where c.table_name = u.table_name;

for a start.

I would start with the running queries, using the v$session and the v$sqlarea. This changes based on oracle version. THis will narrow down the space and not hit everything.

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Here is another modified version that will compare a lower substring match. This works in Oracle 11g.

DECLARE
  match_count INTEGER;
-- Type the owner of the tables you are looking at
  v_owner VARCHAR2(255) :='OWNER_NAME';

-- Type the data type you are look at (in CAPITAL)
-- VARCHAR2, NUMBER, etc.
  v_data_type VARCHAR2(255) :='VARCHAR2';

-- Type the string you are looking at
  v_search_string VARCHAR2(4000) :='%lower-search-sub-string%';

BEGIN
  FOR t IN (SELECT table_name, column_name FROM all_tab_cols where owner=v_owner and data_type = v_data_type) LOOP

    EXECUTE IMMEDIATE 
    'SELECT COUNT(*) FROM '||t.table_name||' WHERE lower('||t.column_name||') like :1'
    INTO match_count
    USING v_search_string;

    IF match_count > 0 THEN
      dbms_output.put_line( t.table_name ||' '||t.column_name||' '||match_count );
    END IF;

  END LOOP;
END;
/
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if we know the table and colum names but want to find out the number of times string is appearing for each schema:

Declare

owner VARCHAR2(1000);
tbl VARCHAR2(1000);
cnt number;
ct number;
str_sql varchar2(1000);
reason varchar2(1000);
x varchar2(1000):='%string_to_be_searched%';

cursor csr is select owner,table_name 
from all_tables where table_name ='table_name';

type rec1 is record (
ct VARCHAR2(1000));

type rec is record (
owner VARCHAR2(1000):='',
table_name VARCHAR2(1000):='');

rec2 rec;
rec3 rec1;
begin

for rec2 in csr loop

--str_sql:= 'select count(*) from '||rec.owner||'.'||rec.table_name||' where CTV_REMARKS like '||chr(39)||x||chr(39);
--dbms_output.put_line(str_sql);
--execute immediate str_sql

execute immediate 'select count(*) from '||rec2.owner||'.'||rec2.table_name||' where column_name like '||chr(39)||x||chr(39)
into rec3;
if rec3.ct <> 0 then
dbms_output.put_line(rec2.owner||','||rec3.ct);
else null;
end if;
end loop;
end;
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I would do something like this (generates all the selects you need). You can later on feed them to sqlplus:

echo "select table_name from user_tables;" | sqlplus -S user/pwd | grep -v "^--" | grep -v "TABLE_NAME" | grep "^[A-Z]" | while read sw;
do echo "desc $sw" | sqlplus -S user/pwd | grep -v "\-\-\-\-\-\-" | awk -F' ' '{print $1}' | while read nw;
do echo "select * from $sw where $nw='val'";
done;
done;

It yields:

select * from TBL1 where DESCRIPTION='val'
select * from TBL1 where ='val'
select * from TBL2 where Name='val'
select * from TBL2 where LNG_ID='val'

And what it does is - for each table_name from user_tables get each field (from desc) and create a select * from table where field equals 'val'.

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I don't of a simple solution on the SQL promprt. Howeve there are quite a few tools like toad and PL/SQL Developer that have a GUI where a user can input the string to be searched and it will return the table/procedure/object where this is found.

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Procedure to Search Entire Database:

    CREATE or REPLACE PROCEDURE SEARCH_DB(SEARCH_STR IN VARCHAR2, TAB_COL_RECS OUT VARCHAR2) IS
      match_count integer;
      qry_str varchar2(1000);
      CURSOR TAB_COL_CURSOR IS 
          SELECT TABLE_NAME,COLUMN_NAME,OWNER,DATA_TYPE FROM ALL_TAB_COLUMNS WHERE DATA_TYPE in ('NUMBER','VARCHAR2') AND OWNER='SCOTT';
          BEGIN  
            FOR TAB_COL_REC  IN TAB_COL_CURSOR
            LOOP
              qry_str := 'SELECT COUNT(*) FROM '||TAB_COL_REC.OWNER||'.'||TAB_COL_REC.TABLE_NAME|| 
              ' WHERE '||TAB_COL_REC.COLUMN_NAME;
               IF TAB_COL_REC.DATA_TYPE = 'NUMBER' THEN
                      qry_str := qry_str||'='||SEARCH_STR; 
               ELSE
                       qry_str := qry_str||' like '||SEARCH_STR; 
               END IF;
                       --dbms_output.put_line( qry_str );
                EXECUTE IMMEDIATE  qry_str  INTO match_count;
                IF match_count > 0 THEN          
                   dbms_output.put_line( qry_str );
                  --dbms_output.put_line( TAB_COL_REC.TABLE_NAME ||' '||TAB_COL_REC.COLUMN_NAME ||' '||match_count);     
                    TAB_COL_RECS := TAB_COL_RECS||'@@'||TAB_COL_REC.TABLE_NAME||'##'||TAB_COL_REC.COLUMN_NAME;
                END IF; 
          END LOOP;
     END SEARCH_DB;    

Execute Statement

  DECLARE
    SEARCH_STR VARCHAR2(200);
    TAB_COL_RECS VARCHAR2(200);
    BEGIN
      SEARCH_STR := 10;
      SEARCH_DB(
        SEARCH_STR => SEARCH_STR,
        TAB_COL_RECS => TAB_COL_RECS
      );
     DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE('TAB_COL_RECS = ' || TAB_COL_RECS);
     END;

Sample Results

Connecting to the database test.
SELECT COUNT(*) FROM SCOTT.EMP WHERE DEPTNO=10
SELECT COUNT(*) FROM SCOTT.DEPT WHERE DEPTNO=10
TAB_COL_RECS = @@EMP##DEPTNO@@DEPT##DEPTNO
Process exited.
Disconnecting from the database test.
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I modified Flood's script to execute once for each table rather than for every column of each table for faster execution. It requires Oracle 11g or greater.

    set serveroutput on size 100000

declare
    v_match_count integer;
    v_counter integer;

    -- The owner of the tables to search through (case-sensitive)
    v_owner varchar2(255) := 'OWNER_NAME';
    -- A string that is part of the data type(s) of the columns to search through (case-insensitive)
    v_data_type varchar2(255) := 'CHAR';
    -- The string to be searched for (case-insensitive)
    v_search_string varchar2(4000) := 'FIND_ME';

    -- Store the SQL to execute for each table in a CLOB to get around the 32767 byte max size for a VARCHAR2 in PL/SQL
    v_sql clob := '';
begin
    for cur_tables in (select owner, table_name from all_tables where owner = v_owner and table_name in 
                       (select table_name from all_tab_columns where owner = all_tables.owner and data_type like '%' ||  upper(v_data_type) || '%')
                       order by table_name) loop
        v_counter := 0;
        v_sql := '';

        for cur_columns in (select column_name from all_tab_columns where 
                            owner = v_owner and table_name = cur_tables.table_name and data_type like '%' || upper(v_data_type) || '%') loop
            if v_counter > 0 then
                v_sql := v_sql || ' or ';
            end if;
            v_sql := v_sql || 'upper(' || cur_columns.column_name || ') like ''%' || upper(v_search_string) || '%''';
            v_counter := v_counter + 1;
        end loop;

        v_sql := 'select count(*) from ' || cur_tables.table_name || ' where ' || v_sql;

        execute immediate v_sql
        into v_match_count;

        if v_match_count > 0 then
            dbms_output.put_line('Match in ' || cur_tables.owner || ': ' || cur_tables.table_name || ' - ' || v_match_count || ' records');
        end if;
    end loop;

    exception
        when others then
            dbms_output.put_line('Error when executing the following: ' || dbms_lob.substr(v_sql, 32600));
end;
/
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Thank you, Chris Conway!

The query worked for Oracle 10 with modification. Even a generalized procedure is found at http://it.toolbox.com/blogs/david/search-for-a-given-string-in-all-fields-of-an-entire-schema-24074

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There are some free tools that make these kind of search, for example, this one works fine and source code is available. http://sites.google.com/site/freejansoft/dbsearch-1

you'll need the Oracle ODBC driver and a DSN to use this tool

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