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I'm having a small difficulty inserting a full sentence containing all characters in my string when I'm building a Linked List.

I would like to be able to insert a string like: word_#_2003_#_definition But when I'm running my code in my main() method it continues repeating the choices to do like it never stops asking me to enter an option. Hope it's clear.

Here's my struct:

struct node
{
    char data[100];
    struct node *previous;  // Points to the previous node
    struct node *next;   // Points out to the next node
} *head, *last;

Here's my function to insert a node:

void insert_beginning(char words[99])
{
    struct node *var, *temp;
    var=(struct node *)malloc(sizeof(struct node)); //explination about the (node *)
    strncpy(var->data, words,99);

    if (head==NULL)
    {
        head=var;
        head->previous=NULL;
        head->next=NULL;
        last=head;
    }
    else
    {
        temp=var;
        temp->previous=NULL;
        temp->next=head;
        head->previous=temp;
        head=temp;
    }
}

And this is in my main() method:

int main()
{
    char loc[99];
    char words[99];
    int i, dat;

    head=NULL;

    printf("Select the choice of operation on link list");
    printf("\n1.) Insert At Begning\n2.) Insert At End\n3.) Insert At Middle");
    printf("\n4.) Delete From End\n5.) Reverse The Link List\n6.) Display List\n7.)Exit");

    while(1)
    {
        printf("\n\n Enter the choice of operation you want to do ");
        scanf("%d",&i);

        switch(i)
        {
            case 1:
            {
                printf("Enter a word you want to insert in the 1st node ");
                scanf(" %s",words);

                insert_beginning(words);
                display();
                break;
            }

Any ideas on how to do it?

share|improve this question
    
Your code is not complete! –  rullof Dec 30 '13 at 23:47
    
Maybe because of the while loop? –  Smac89 Dec 30 '13 at 23:47
    
Where's the logic that exits the while loop? –  keshlam Dec 30 '13 at 23:49
    
@keshlam he didn't included the whole code! can't you see that the switch and the while are note closed –  rullof Dec 30 '13 at 23:49
2  
Your problem is that scanf() reads just one space delimited word, and leaves behind the second, then the scanf() for the number fails to convert (but you didn't check the return from scanf(), so you don't know that), and goes back to the switch/case to read the next word, etc. This is not what you had in mind, but it is what you wrote. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 30 '13 at 23:50

2 Answers 2

The code is highly questionable:

  • return codes are never checked. You must check return codes, especially if you are using scanf
  • You need to empty the whole buffer with scanf otherwise you will continue reading old contents for the next command
  • A better alternative is to use sscanf
  • You must initialize your variables, for instance last, but there are additional cases of variables that do not get initialized
  • Your data types are not consistently defined, this will create security problems sometimes 99 characters and sometimes 100.
  • insert_beginning should not return void, the memory allocation can fail
share|improve this answer
    
Since the input code has 99 and the loner-term storage structure has 100, there isn't a problem during input operations. If the value is fetched from the data structure into a 99-character buffer, there could be a problem if the extra byte had somehow been exploited to make the string overlong. Don't get me wrong: consistency is very important in programming in general, but the risk here is low. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 31 '13 at 0:17

Your code in main() should probably look more like:

int main()
{
    char loc[99];
    char words[99];
    int i, dat;

    head = NULL;

    printf("Select the choice of operation on link list");
    printf("\n1.) Insert At Beginning\n2.) Insert At End\n3.) Insert At Middle");
    printf("\n4.) Delete From End\n5.) Reverse The Link List\n6.) Display List\n7.) Exit\n");

    while(1)
    {
        printf("\nEnter the choice of operation you want to do: ");
        if (scanf("%d", &i) != 1)
        {
            fprintf(stderr, "Failed to read a number: exiting\n");
            return 1;
        }

        switch(i)
        {
            case 1:
            {
                printf("Enter a word you want to insert in the 1st node: ");
                if (scanf("%98s", words) != 1)
                {
                    fprintf(stderr, "Failed to read words; exiting\n");
                    return 1;
                }

                insert_beginning(words);
                display();
                break;
            }
            ...
         }
         ...
      }
      ...
   }
   return 0;
}

As discussed in the comments, you are not checking the return status from scanf(), so you don't know when it is failing, and when it fails to read a number, it leaves the argument (i) alone, so you go back to the same option again, and rinse and repeat.

Elementary debugging techniques (not shown):

  1. Print the values you get from your inputs. Print the value of i after the scanf() error checking. Print the value of words after the scanf() error checking.

  2. Step through with a debugger.

  3. Create a function to dump (print) your key data structures:

    static void dump_data_structure(FILE *fp, char const *tag, data_structure const *data)
    {
        ...code to dump the structure to the specified file stream,
        ...identified by tag (so you can tell which call it is you are looking at)
    }
    
  4. Use the structure dumper extensively while debugging. Keep it for use later when modifying the code. If done right, it can be enormously helpful.

share|improve this answer
    
This code is still problematic. If the user enters more than one word on a line it will ignore the other words or if unlucky use a string as a command. –  steve Dec 31 '13 at 0:09
    
@steve: Yes -- the revised code is not perfect, but it will check the return value from scanf() and head off trouble earlier. It would be possible to revise the code to use fgets() and sscanf(), amongst other alternatives, but it probably won't help him all that much at the moment (and he'd still need to check the input functions for errors). He can type (on a single line 1 Word 2 Alter 3 Ego 4 7 and the program will go through a number of operations before exiting, all from a single line of input. That's the way the code is currently designed; I didn't fix it to do otherwise. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 31 '13 at 0:13

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