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I was confronted with a tricky (IMO) question. I needed to compare two MAC addresses, in the most efficient manner.

The only thought that crossed my mind in that moment was the trivial solution - a for loop, and comparing locations, and so I did, but the interviewer was aiming to casting.

The MAC definition:

typedef struct macA {
   char data[6];
} MAC;

And the function is (the one I was asked to implement):

int isEqual(MAC* addr1, MAC* addr2)
{
    int i;

    for(i = 0; i<6; i++)
    {
        if(addr1->data[i] != addr2->data[i]) 
            return 0;
    }
    return 1;
}

But as mentioned, he was aiming for casting.

Meaning, to somehow cast the MAC address given to an int, compare both of the addresses, and return.

But when casting, int int_addr1 = (int)addr1;, only four bytes will be casted, right? Should I check the remaining ones? Meaning locations 4 and 5?

Both char and int are integer types so casting is legal, but what happens in the described situation?

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1  
Sorry, but who said you had to do any int casting? he wanted you to do char comparison –  nrathaus Dec 31 '13 at 14:46
1  
Is this meant for an embedded system? –  Michael Hampton Dec 31 '13 at 18:25
1  
since the size of a MAC is 48 bits (6 bytes) by definition, it makes sense to #define MAC_SIZE (6). –  ChuckCottrill Dec 31 '13 at 18:58
3  
For what it's worth, when I ask this sort of question -- which I try not to! -- I'm generally not looking for a single answer but for what questions the applicant asks about the constraints and priorities, and whether they can discuss why they chose one answer rather than another. –  keshlam Jan 1 '14 at 5:20

10 Answers 10

up vote 105 down vote accepted

If he is really dissatisfied with this approach (which is essentially a brain fart, since you aren't comparing megabytes or gigabytes of data, so one shan't really be worrying about "efficiency" and "speed" in this case), just tell him that you trust the quality and speed of the standard library:

int isEqual(MAC* addr1, MAC* addr2)
{
    return memcmp(&addr1->data, &addr2->data, sizeof(addr1->data)) == 0;
}
share|improve this answer
20  
@H2CO3, you can write a post rewriting an OS i/o sub-system and garner 35 points. Smack down an interviewer - a process everyone inherently hates - and 150! –  Duck Dec 31 '13 at 15:00
4  
@H2CO3: While true that data is an array and not a pointer, memcmp(addr1->data, addr2->data, sizeof(addr1->data)) is still correct (due to decay), no? –  legends2k Dec 31 '13 at 15:06
4  
@haccks: To me, the eagles only represent that "you can log in anytime, but you can never log out"... –  Kerrek SB Dec 31 '13 at 15:17
3  
@chux Because there may be padding at the end of the struct which contains unspecified padding bytes. That would result in false negatives. –  user529758 Dec 31 '13 at 21:32
4  
@Lee Huh what? "memcmp of two ints is inefficient" is not true as-is (see the discussion above). Also, "sane code" == code that's not unnecessarily "clever" and does not rely on UB if not needed. One property of sane code is the reliance on the standard library. You see now? –  user529758 Dec 31 '13 at 23:55

If your interviewer demands that you produce undefined behavior, I would probably look for a job elsewhere.

The correct initial approach would be to store the MAC address in something like a uint64_t, at least in-memory. Then comparisons would be trivial, and implementable efficiently.

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7  
@ltzik984 No, most probably he has no idea that this is undefined behavior. –  user529758 Dec 31 '13 at 14:43
4  
@Abyx: Why not post as an answer what you think should be done, and we can see whether it's UB? –  Kerrek SB Dec 31 '13 at 14:55
3  
@Abyx It does lead to UB. At the very moment you dereference the pointer to an incompatible type. –  user529758 Dec 31 '13 at 14:59
14  
@Abyx: You don't know C, but you're voting me down for not suggesting something that would be wrong? :-S –  Kerrek SB Dec 31 '13 at 15:14
6  
@rm5248: A MAC address is just a number. It's like if you insisted on designing your own 21-bit integer for textual characters, rather than using the sane char32_t. –  Kerrek SB Dec 31 '13 at 23:15

Cowboy time:

typedef struct macA {
   char data[6];
} MAC;

typedef struct sometimes_works {
   long some;
   short more;
} cast_it

typedef union cowboy
{
    MAC real;
    cast_it hack;
} cowboy_cast;

int isEqual(MAC* addr1, MAC* addr2)
{
     assert(sizeof(MAC) == sizeof(cowboy_cast));  // Can't be bigger
     assert(sizeof(MAC) == sizeof(cast_it));      // Can't be smaller

     if ( ( ((cowboy_cast *)addr1)->hack.some == ((cowboy_cast *)addr2)->hack.some )
       && ( ((cowboy_cast *)addr1)->hack.more == ((cowboy_cast *)addr2)->hack.more ) )
             return (0 == 0);

     return (0 == 42);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
cowboy_cast should've been a union, shouldn't it. –  user529758 Dec 31 '13 at 16:23
    
I am not sure how you gain much here using the union. I mean if you have alignment issues with your MAC, then you will still have them, Meanwhile if you dont have alignement issues, then you are still relying on the sizeof(MAC) being 6 and/or the padding being in the right place. It seems like the same risks you are running casting the MAC/data point directly. –  RichardPlunkett Dec 31 '13 at 17:02
    
@RichardPlunkett I included the cowboy cast because it does sometimes come up in interviews, or legacy code, and whether it has benefits over direct cast or memcmp is not as important as knowing of this approach, and most likely avoiding it. But if you haven't seen it, you can't say why. –  Glenn Teitelbaum Dec 31 '13 at 17:08
2  
@RichardPlunkett No. Unions guarantee correct alignment. Since C99, union-based type punning is legal (it's no longer UB), unlike aliasing through pointers to incompatible types. –  user529758 Dec 31 '13 at 21:34
1  
@H2CO3, I dont think a union does guarantee alignment here. I mean if you declare a cowboy_cast variable, it will be aligned correctly for this, but you cant guarantee any miscellaneous MAC struct will have correct alignment for a cowboy_cast, and we are passed a MAC pointer. –  RichardPlunkett Jan 1 '14 at 1:47

There is nothing wrong with an efficient implementation, for all you know this has been determined to be hot code that is called many many times. And in any case, its okay for interview questions to have odd constraints.

Logical AND is a priori a branching instruction due to short-circuit evaluation even if it doesn't compile this way, so lets avoid it, we don't need it. Nor do we need to convert our return value to a true bool (true or false, not 0 or anything that's not zero).

Here is a fast solution on 32-bit: XOR will capture the differences, OR will record difference in both parts, and NOT will negate the condition into EQUALS, not UNEQUAL. The LHS and RHS are independent computations, so a superscalar processor can do this in parallel.

int isEqual(MAC* addr1, MAC* addr2)
{
    return ~((*(int*)addr2 ^ *(int*)addr1) | (int)(((short*)addr2)[2] ^ ((short*)addr1)[2]));
}

EDIT
The purpose of the above code was to show that this could be done efficiently without branching. Comments have pointed out this C++ classifies this as undefined behavior. While true, VS handles this fine. Without changing the interviewer's struct definition and function signature, in order to avoid undefined behavior an extra copy must be made. So the non-undefined behavior way without branching but with an extra copy would be as follows:

int isEqual(MAC* addr1, MAC* addr2)
{
    struct IntShort
    {
        int   i;
        short s;
    };

    union MACU
    {
        MAC addr;
        IntShort is;
    };

    MACU u1;
    MACU u2;

    u1.addr = *addr1; // extra copy
    u2.addr = *addr2; // extra copy

    return ~((u1.is.i ^ u2.is.i) | (int)(u1.is.s ^ u2.is.s)); // still no branching
}
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1  
Can I ask why is this not undefined b., such as this stackoverflow.com/a/20859133/2327831? Even if you assume that int is sizeof 4 and short is 2, you are still casting and dereferencing an incompatible type. –  this Jan 19 '14 at 14:14
    
@self I believe this really isn't undefined behavior, but rather implementation defined behavior. That is, it is well defined on a per platform basis. However after much searching I haven't found anything official-looking that address this. If you read the first comment here, this suggests the same thing stackoverflow.com/q/11373203/3100771 even though this is talking about unions. One could just as easily define a function-scope union type and do the operation in terms of that. I would be very interested to see a full list of implementation defined behavior in C++; Google failed me. –  Apriori Jan 20 '14 at 3:06
    
It is undefined behavior because you're breaking pointer aliasing rules. There are compilers that won't let you get away with that and just optimize the whole thing away without warning you. You should use an union. Even though it's still a violation of the spec, most compilers support it and don't consider it undefined behavior. –  M28 Jan 21 '14 at 11:08
    
@M28 Type punning with unions is not a violation of semantics. It has well-defined behavior in C99 and later. –  user529758 Jan 28 '14 at 9:45
1  
@self. Your answer is fine, upvoted. I'm not sure you need the additional struct, though (uint16_t w[3]; would've been enough). –  user529758 Jan 28 '14 at 14:07

This would work on most systems,and be faster than your solution.

int isEqual(MAC* addr1, MAC* addr2)
{
    return ((int32*)addr1)[0] == ((int32*)addr2)[0] &&  ((int16*)addr1)[2] == ((int16*)addr2)[2];
}

would inline nicely too, could be handy at the center of loop on a system where you can check the details are viable.

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12  
And thus the hydra of Undefined Behaviour rears several of its many heads. –  Kerrek SB Dec 31 '13 at 15:01
3  
While true, it would be worth mentioning that this relies on undefined behavior. –  user529758 Dec 31 '13 at 15:01
2  
Wait, are you the interviewer? Where do you work again? –  Kerrek SB Dec 31 '13 at 15:02
3  
At least redefine the structure as a union with uint16_t[3] or uint32_t+uint16_t if extra padding is allowable and compare those fields to avoid UB. Of course many compilers are sufficiently clever to appropriately optimize fixed-size memcmp(), especially if given an alignment hint –  doynax Dec 31 '13 at 15:06
3  
@doynax: The most obvious problem is that the platform may require aligned storage for integer operations, so if your character pointer doesn't satisfy that, your CPU may raise an exception. x86 doesn't have that problem, but there are other platforms that do. –  Kerrek SB Dec 31 '13 at 16:16

Non-portable casting solution.

In a platform I use (PIC24 based), there is a type int48, so making a safe assumption char is 8 bits and the usual alignment requirements:

int isEqual(MAC* addr1, MAC* addr2) {
  return *((int48_t*) &addr1->data) == *((int48_t*) &addr2->data);
}

Of course, this is not usable on many platforms, but then so are a number of solutions that are not portable either, depending on assumed int size, no padding, etc.

The highest portable solution (and reasonably fast given a good compiler) is the memcmp() offered by @H2CO3.

Going to a higher design level and using a wide enough integer type like uint64_t instead of struct macA, as suggested by Kerrek SB, is very appealing.

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To do type punning correctly you have to use an union. Otherwise you will break the rules strict aliasing which certain compilers follow, and the result will be undefined.

int EqualMac( MAC* a , MAC* b )
{
    union
    {
        MAC m ;
        uint16_t w[3] ;

    } ua , ub ;

    ua.m = *a ;
    ub.m = *b ;

    if( ua.w[0] != ub.w[0] )  
        return 0 ;

    if( ua.w[1] != ub.w[1] )
        return 0 ;

    if( ua.w[2] != ub.w[2] )
        return 0 ;

return 1 ;
}

According to C99 it is safe to read from an union member that is not the last used to store a value in it.

If the member used to read the contents of a union object is not the same as the member last used to store a value in the object, the appropriate part of the object representation of the value is reinterpreted as an object representation in the new type as described in 6.2.6 (a process sometimes called "type punning"). This might be a trap representation.

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You have a MAC structure (which contains an array of 6 bytes),

typedef struct {
    char data[6];
} MAC;

Which agrees with this article about typedef for fixed length byte array.

The naive approach would be to assume the MAC address is word aligned (which is probably what the interviewer wanted), albeit not guaranteed.

typedef unsigned long u32;
typedef   signed long s32;
typedef unsigned short u16;
typedef   signed short s16;

int
MACcmp(MAC* mac1, MAC* mac2)
{
    if(!mac1 || !mac2) return(-1); //check for NULL args
    u32 m1 = *(u32*)mac1->data;
    U32 m2 = *(u32*)mac2->data;
    if( m1 != m2 ) return (s32)m1 - (s32)m2;
    u16 m3 = *(u16*)(mac1->data+4);
    u16 m2 = *(u16*)(mac2->data+4);
    return (s16)m3 - (s16)m4;
}

Slightly safer would be to interpret the char[6] as a short[3] (MAC more likely to be aligned on even byte boundaries than odd),

typedef unsigned short u16;
typedef   signed short s16;

int
MACcmp(MAC* mac1, MAC* mac2)
{
    if(!mac1 || !mac2) return(-1); //check for NULL args
    u16* p1 = (u16*)mac1->data;
    u16* p2 = (u16*)mac2->data;
    for( n=0; n<3; ++n ) {
        if( *p1 != *p2 ) return (s16)*p1 - (s16)*p2;
    }
    return(0);
}

Assume nothing, and copy to word aligned storage, but the only reason for typecasting here is to satisfy the interviewer,

typedef unsigned short u16;
typedef   signed short s16;

int
MACcmp(MAC* mac1, MAC* mac2)
{
    if(!mac1 || !mac2) return(-1); //check for NULL args
    u16 m1[3]; u16 p2[3];
    memcpy(m1,mac1->data,6);
    memcpy(m2,mac2->data,6);
    for( n=0; n<3; ++n ) {
        if( m1[n] != m2[n] ) return (s16)m1[n] - (s16)m2[n];
    }
    return(0);
}

Save yourself lots of work,

int
MACcmp(MAC* mac1, MAC* mac2)
{
    if(!mac1 || !mac2) return(-1);
    return memcmp(mac1->data,mac2->data,6);
}
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To begin with: Are you really sure unsigned long is 32 bytes in size? –  Guilherme Bernal Jan 1 '14 at 0:34

Function memcmp will eventually do the loop itself. So by using it, you would basically just make things less efficient (due to the additional function-call).

Here is an optional solution:

typedef struct
{
    int x;
    short y;
}
MacAddr;

int isEqual(MAC* addr1, MAC* addr2)
{
    return *(MacAddr*)addr1 == *(MacAddr*)addr2;
}

The compiler will most likely convert this code into two comparisons, since the MacAddr structure contains two fields.

Cavity: unless your CPU supports unaligned load/store operations, addr1 and addr2 must be aligned to 4 bytes (i.e., they must be located in addresses that are divisible by 4). Otherwise, a memory access violation will most likely occur when the function is executed.

You may divide the structure into 3 fields of 2 bytes each, or 6 fields of 1 byte each (reducing the alignment restriction to 2 or 1 respectively). But bare in mind that a single comparison in your source code is not necessarily a single comparison in the executable image (i.e., during runtime).

BTW, unaligned load/store operations by themselves may add runtime latency, if they require more "nops" in the CPU pipeline. This is really a matter of CPU architecture, which I doubt they meant to "dig into" that far in your job interview. However, in order to assert that the compiled code does not contain such operations (if indeed they are "expensive"), you could ensure that the variables are always aligned to 8 bytes AND add a #pragma (compiler directive) telling the compiler "not to worry about this".

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"Function memcmp will eventually do the loop itself. So by using it, you would basically just make things less efficient (due to the additional function-call)." - not necessarily. In fact, that's very unlikely. Stdlib functions do all sort of clever optimizations, not to mention compiler intrinsic functions which are not "called" but inline code is emitted for them. –  user529758 Dec 31 '13 at 21:35
2  
How are you comparing.long long There is no way to tell if the last 2 unmapped bytes will be equal when the first six are. There is not even a guarentee that they are accessible. –  Glenn Teitelbaum Dec 31 '13 at 21:50
    
@Glenn Teitelbaum, thanks for the correction, I had that in mind and somehow forgot to relate to that. Will fix the answer. –  barak manos Dec 31 '13 at 21:54
    
I'm certain C does not define an int to be 4 char and neither short to be 2 char. Is not the 2nd isEqual() approach highly dependent on that assumption? Presently work with embedded processors all the time that have sizeof(int) as 2 and work with network communication. If anything, typedef struct { int32_t x; int16 y; } MacAddr; would be better. –  chux Dec 31 '13 at 22:00
    
Also you can't propose 8 byte alignment, looking at an array of MAC. Odd elements will rarely be 8 byte aligned, but you should be able to compare them. –  Glenn Teitelbaum Dec 31 '13 at 22:02

May be he had in mind a definition of MAC that used unsigned char and was thinking to:

int isEqual(MAC* addr1, MAC* addr2) { return strncmp((*addr1).data,(*addr2).data,6)==0; }

which implies a cast from (unsigned char *) to (char *). Anyway bad question.

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