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This question already has an answer here:

Currently, my SQL search query use LIKE clause with %some-word-to-search% wildcards.

The problem of using percent wildcard is that it's returning all the rows which containing a part of my search param, e,g:

If I search car It will also show cartoons to me! is there any way to compare like clause only with entire words instead of part of it?

Any suggestion would be appreciated...

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marked as duplicate by Barranka, OGHaza, Hrundi V. Bakshi, Aniket Kulkarni, Linger Apr 2 '14 at 13:03

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
Put a space before and after "some-word-to-search"? – Clive Dec 31 '13 at 14:50
    
see if this discussion could help stackoverflow.com/questions/656951/… – arilia Dec 31 '13 at 14:53
1  
Do not use wildcard character. You will get exact matching of record. – Saharsh Shah Dec 31 '13 at 14:53
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use a regular expression that matches word boundary. For example, this will match rows where the text contains "car" as a single word, even when it's the first or last word, or adjacent to punctuation:

SELECT * FROM mytable WHERE mytext REGEXP '[[:<:]]car[[:>:]]';

Note that these kinds of queries require a table scan. A full text index can give better performance.

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Thanks for this excellent way, I will accept this answer in next 2 minutes. – iSun Dec 31 '13 at 15:04

You can also look at the natural language search function match():

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/fulltext-natural-language.html

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