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I was trying scala-99 P09.

The answer given by author is:

object P09 {
  def pack[A](ls: List[A]): List[List[A]] = {
    if (ls.isEmpty) List(List())
    else {
      val (packed, next) = ls span { _ == ls.head }
      if (next == Nil) List(packed)
      else packed :: pack(next)
    }
  }
}

It gives that:

pack(List('a, 'a, 'a, 'a, 'b, 'c, 'c, 'a, 'a, 'd, 'e, 'e, 'e, 'e))
// res0: List[List[Symbol]] = List(List('a, 'a, 'a, 'a), List('b), List('c, 'c), List('a, 'a), List('d), List('e, 'e, 'e, 'e))

and

pack(List[Int]()) // => res1: List[List[Int]] = List(List())

But, I think it should be List[List[Int]] = List()

For what reason, the author makes it return List(List()) instead of List()?

Added

Today, I come across P26(Generate the combinations of K distinct objects chosen from the N elements of a list.), which I gave the following solution at first:

def combinationsOf[A](n: Int, ls: List[A]): List[List[A]] = {
  if (n < 0 || n > ls.length) throw new IllegalArgumentException
  else if (n == 0) List.empty[List[A]]
  else if (n == ls.length) List(ls)
  else combinationsOf(n - 1, ls.tail).map(ls.head :: _) ::: combinationsOf(n, ls.tail)
}

But when given K = 3, and List(1,2,3,4), It only outputs (1,2,4), (1,3,4), (2,3,4), which is wrong. I know what's wrong in my code. So I make it right:

def combinationsOf[A](n: Int, ls: List[A]): List[List[A]] = {
  if (n < 0 || n > ls.length) throw new IllegalArgumentException
  else if (n == 0) List(Nil)
  else if (n == ls.length) List(ls)
  else combinationsOf(n - 1, ls.tail).map(ls.head :: _) ::: combinationsOf(n, ls.tail)
}

What I cannot understand stands still. Why List(Nil) is needed when List() seems to be more suitable ?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

From the Ninety-Nine Scala Problems page:

These are an adaptation of the Ninety-Nine Prolog Problems written by Werner Hett at the Berne University of Applied Sciences in Berne, Switzerland. I (Phil Gold) have altered them to be more amenable to programming in Scala. Feedback is appreciated, particularly on anything marked TODO.

Now, if you check the Ninety-Nine Prolog Problems you'll see that problem 1.09 is basically the same problem listed here. The Prolog Problems site also provides solutions, and if you check the solution for 1.09 you'll see this:

pack([],[]).

I'm not much of a prolog programmer, but I'm pretty sure that means that an empty list as input results in an empty list as output. In the case where the input is the empty list, the 99 Lisp Problems and 99 Haskel Problems solutions for this problem also give empty lists (not a list containing a single empty list).

I think the List(List()) expression in the answer does look like it was just caused by confusion about how to create an empty list of lists. As @SpiderPig shows in his modified solution, returning a List() instead of List(List()) actually does a lot to simplify the recursive logic.

The 99 Scala Problems page has a link for providing feedback, so you could always point out this problem and suggest a fix.


What I cannot understand stands still. Why List(Nil) is needed when List() seems to be more suitable?

In the last case in your function you map over the results of all the recursive calls. If your recursive call returns List(), then you map over an empty list, which will always return an empty list. In contrast, map(ls.head :: _) will return List(ls.head) if _ was List(Nil) instead of List(). You can fix this problem by adding another case for n=1:

def combinationsOf[A](n: Int, ls: List[A]): List[List[A]] = {
  require(0 <= n && n <= ls.length) // using require is probably better style
  if (n == 0) List()
  else if (n == 1) ls.map(List(_)) // fixes map over empty list problem
  else if (n == ls.length) List(ls)
  else combinationsOf(n - 1, ls.tail).map(ls.head :: _) ::: combinationsOf(n, ls.tail)
}

Also note that instead of explicitly throwing an IllegalArgumentException, I swapped the first case with a require (which throws an IllegalArgumentException if the clause is false).

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@WindorC - I updated my answer. –  DaoWen Jan 8 at 22:47
    
thx. the require is a good advice. –  Windor C Jan 16 at 12:04

I don't know. I also think it should return an empty list if the input list is empty. I would write it like this

def pack[A](ls: List[A]): List[List[A]] = {
  if (ls.isEmpty) List.empty[List[A]]
  else {
    val (packed, next) = ls span { _ == ls.head }
    packed :: pack(next)
  }
}

or even shorter

def pack[A](ls: List[A]): List[List[A]] = ls.groupBy(identity).values.toList
share|improve this answer
1  
The "shorter" solution here is wrong because it doesn't maintain order, and it merges non-adjacent entries into a single group. I think your first solution is good though. If you look at the later problems you'll see that the user is expected to use this function to build a simplistic compression scheme (e.g. a a a a b b b => (4 a) (3 b)), so the order does matter. –  DaoWen Dec 31 '13 at 21:15

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