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Probably this is asked 100 times before, but i can't find or produce a solution. Everything (as far as i have tested) is recognized, only pressing space is not working. I'm typing a space + hit enter, the cursor just moves to the next line and nothing happens. How can i make this work?

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
#include <cctype>

using namespace std;


int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    cout << "Press a key please:  " << endl;
    char key;
    cin >> key;

    if (isalpha(key))
        cout << key << " is a letter." << endl;
    else if (isdigit(key))
        cout << key << " is a number." << endl;
    else if (isspace(key))
        cout << key << " is a space." << endl;
    else if (ispunct(key))
        cout << key << " is a punctuation" << endl;
    return 0;
}
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marked as duplicate by P0W, Jonathan Leffler, fvu, Walter, Jim Garrison Dec 31 '13 at 19:57

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Do some debugging. What is in key when you press space? –  David Heffernan Dec 31 '13 at 16:16
    
"Probably this is asked 100 times before" yes a simple search would have shown this ! –  P0W Dec 31 '13 at 16:24
    
@DavidHeffernan 32 ' ' . I have looked for the ANSII code for space and it is 32, but couldn't figure out how to use it. –  WonderWorld Dec 31 '13 at 16:25
1  
That's not true. cin >> key does not put a space in key. –  David Heffernan Dec 31 '13 at 16:27
    
@P0W i have searched. Only reference i could find is how to identify spaces in a string with isspace. That is in the cplusplus.com/reference/locale/isspace –  WonderWorld Dec 31 '13 at 16:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The problem is, that cin uses whitespace as a separator (also tab, newline). Therefore, you have to read your input ignoring the separator:

cin >> noskipws >> x;

Alternatively use get for single characters:

cin.get(x);

Also have a look at How to cin Space in c++?

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This works. Almost had it, cin.get(key) >> key; but that didn't compute. –  WonderWorld Dec 31 '13 at 16:30
    
Because this makes no sense... –  Sebastian Dressler Dec 31 '13 at 16:31
    
Odd that in the book they don't use cin.get(), also at least one example on the internet didn't use it. book says cin >> key. –  WonderWorld Dec 31 '13 at 16:43
    
Because this is the way to read in something in C++ and somewhere in the book they should mention, that it handles spaces and stuff as separator. –  Sebastian Dressler Dec 31 '13 at 16:44
    
page 537: the overloaded operator >> automaticly skips whitespace and only returns one word(string) at the time. –  WonderWorld Dec 31 '13 at 16:59

When you use the formatted input functions (i.e., operator>>()) the input will skip leading whitespace by default. If you want to read a char which may be a space, you'll need to use the std::noskipws manipulator to disable this skipping:

if (std::cin >> std::noskipws >> c) {
    // ...
}

Alternatively, you can use unformatted input functions, e.g., get() to read individual characters without changing the stream setup: the unformatted input functions don't skip leading whitespaces (which is often causing grief when changing between formatted input, e.g., for an int, and unformatted input, e.g., reading a line using std::getline()):

if (std::cin.get(c)) {
    // ...
}

Also, note that you can only pass positive values (and EOF) to any of the is....() functions but char is signed on many platforms. You need to turn your char into a suitable value first, using, e.g., one of

isspace(static_cast<unsigned char>(c))
isspace(std::char_traits<char>::to_int_type(c))
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2  
You can also pass EOF to the is*() functions, but that doesn't detract from your point that the argument is supposed to be the int value of an unsigned char representation of the character (or EOF). –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 31 '13 at 16:22
    
@JonathanLeffler: Thanks! I have corrected the answer. –  Dietmar Kühl Dec 31 '13 at 16:31
    
I would mention istream::get(). the most natural choice for general single-character input, imho. for the OP's specific case I would also recommend adding a istream::ignore( -1, '\n' ). well after checking that -1 would produce the requisite max value (pretty sure of that though). –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Dec 31 '13 at 17:00
    
@Cheersandhth.-Alf: I added a statement on get(). Whether anything needs to be ignored is a different topic (and don't see any reason it is). Of course, the spelling for the suitable constant is not -1 but std::numeric_limits<std::streamsize>::max(). –  Dietmar Kühl Dec 31 '13 at 17:08

cin skips all whitespace (spaces, tabs, new lines, etc.) by default. You can either change its behavior, or use a slightly different mechanism. To change its behavior, use the manipulator noskipws, as follows:

char key;
cin >> noskipws >> key;

You can read more about this here 'How to cin Space in c++?'.

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1  
Thanks for improving your answer! –  Brandon Buck Dec 31 '13 at 17:11
2  
Thanks for the guidance, always learning! –  João Pinho Dec 31 '13 at 17:12

How to read a space character.

Replace this:

cin >> key;

which skips whitespace and leaves text in the input buffer, with this:

auto const max_streamsize = numeric_limits<streamsize>::max();

key = char( cin.get() );
cin.ignore( max_streamsize, '\n' );

which doesn't skip whitespace, and consumes all of the input line.

The problem with not consuming all of an input line, such as the terminating '\n' character, is that this remaining text will then be read by the next input operation, without first waiting for physical user input.


How to use the C character classifier functions.

The C functions such as isalpha require a non-negative character code, or else the special value EOF, as argument.

With most C++ compilers the char is, however, signed by default. In general that means formal Undefined Behavior if it's passed directly to e.g. isalpha. For example, checking whether a char value 'ø' (Norwegian lowercase Ø) is alphabetical, by passing it straight to isalpha, is Undefined Behavior with most C++ compilers, and may crash in debug mode with Visual C++ and some other compilers.

A simple solution is to cast it to unsigned char (note: cannot pass EOF this way):

typedef unsigned char UChar;

... isalpha( UChar( ch ) ) ...

Complete example, like the original code:

#include <iostream>
#include <limits>       // std::numeric_limits
#include <ctype.h>      // isalpha etc.
using namespace std;

auto main()
    -> int
{
    typedef unsigned char UChar;
    auto const max_streamsize = numeric_limits<streamsize>::max();

    for( ;; )
    {
        cout << "Type a character please (x to exit):  ";
        char const key = char( cin.get() );
        cin.ignore( max_streamsize, '\n' );

        if( key == 'x' ) { break; }

        if( isalpha( UChar( key ) ) )
            cout << key << " is a letter." << endl;
        else if( isdigit( UChar( key ) ) )
            cout << key << " is a number." << endl;
        else if( isspace( UChar( key ) ) )
            cout << key << " is a space." << endl;
        else if( ispunct( UChar( key ) ) )
            cout << key << " is a punctuation" << endl;
        else
            cout << key << " is some unknown kind of character" << endl;
    }
}
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