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I'll start by saying I'm brand new to Perl and regex and I have never been best buddies.

My problem is, I have a text file full of lines. Each line contains many 'words'. These words can contain letters, numbers, -, =, etc. Pretty much everything except white space. Each words is separated by white space.

In every line there is one word that starts with three unique characters, 'mc='. So the word could be 'mc=abcde123', 'mc=12345hij', 'mc=blah'... you get my drift. I want to extract this word from each line and insert them into a new text file.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use warnings;

my $input = 'input.txt';
my $output = 'output.txt';

open (FILE, "<", $input) or die "Can not open $input $!";
open my $out, '>' $output or die "Can not open $output $!";

while (<FILE>){
    /(\s+mc=\/*S)/g;
    print $out $_;
}

Not sure how much use any of this code will be to you. I'm well aware the regex is wrong- this just prints the entire content of input.txt into output.txt. Eventually I will be extracting additional values so If anyone could find it in their heart to help this poor, young, ignorant programmer out, I would be more than grateful!

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3  
print $out "$1\n" if /\b(mc=\S*)/; –  mpapec Dec 31 '13 at 16:17
    
You probably already have this (should be getting a syntax err), but you're also missing a comma...`open my $out,'>',$output or die "Can not open $output $!"; –  Gordolio Dec 31 '13 at 16:25
1  
@mpapec That will match fake-mc=123. –  TLP Dec 31 '13 at 16:41
    
@TLP is that bad? –  mpapec Dec 31 '13 at 16:42
1  
@mpapec He says each line contains one word that starts with three unique characters, 'mc='. And that the word contains anything except whitespace. –  TLP Dec 31 '13 at 16:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The only thing you want to match is a string of non-whitespace that begins with mc=, which is preceded by either start of string or whitespace. So the regex you want would be

/(?<!\S)(mc=\S*)/g

Using the negative lookbehind assertion (?<!\S) is a way to assert that we do not have non-whitespace before our keyword. We cannot use (?<=\s|^) (match whitespace or beginning of string) because lookbehind assertions cannot be variable length, so this is a workaround.

You can use for example:

perl -nle 'print for /(?<!\S)(mc=\S*)/g' input.txt > output.txt

A one-liner which will print the matched strings on a new line for each word, and using shell redirection (*nix shell) we print the words to a new file. This will replace your entire script.

You can also use the following to patch your own code:

print $out $_ for /(?<!\S)(mc=\S*)/g;

But making the file names hard coded is unnecessary, I feel, especially when perl has such nice predefined features to use in this case.

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+1; I prefer /(?<! pattern)/x –  mpapec Dec 31 '13 at 17:03
    
@mpapec I always think the /x modifier makes things look strange. –  TLP Dec 31 '13 at 17:15
    
Thanks you so much. Not only have you answered my question, but you've actually explained it in a way that makes sense to my tired and confused brain. Would you care to write a textbook on the subject, per chance? –  coding_failure Dec 31 '13 at 20:02
    
You're welcome. Too limited subject for a book, surely, but I'm glad it helped. –  TLP Dec 31 '13 at 20:24
    
There is already a book about writing regular expressions. –  Brad Gilbert Jan 1 at 5:13
#!/usr/bin/perl

use warnings;

my $input = 'input.txt';
my $output = 'output.txt';

open (FILE, "<", $input) or die "Can not open $input $!";
open my $out, '>' $output or die "Can not open $output $!";

while (<FILE>){
    my @arr = /(?: ^|\s )(mc=\S*)/xg or next;
    print $out "$_\n" for @arr;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This will match abcmc= as well, in fact any string which contains mc= because \s* also matches the empty string. –  TLP Dec 31 '13 at 16:45
    
@TLP check update –  mpapec Dec 31 '13 at 16:51
    
@mpapec With the amount of editing you've done on this question, you might as well have written your own answer. :) –  TLP Dec 31 '13 at 17:02
    
Thanks folks, you've explained the solution brilliantly! –  coding_failure Dec 31 '13 at 20:05

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