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I'm trying my hand at creating classes in lua. I've written some simple code to set and get a string value, but i keep getting null back as a result.

Here's what my class definition looks like:

appUser = {}
appUser_mt = { __index = appUser }

-- This function creates a new instance of appUser
function appUser:new()
    local new_inst = {}    -- the new instance
    setmetatable( new_inst, appUser_mt)-- all instances share the same metatable.
    return new_inst
end
-- Here are some functions (methods) for appUser:
function appUser:setLastName(lname)
    appUser._lname = lname
end

function appUser:setFirstName(fname)
    appUser._fname = fname
end

function appUser:getLastName()
    return appUser._lname
end

function appUser:getFirstName()
    return appUser._fname
end

return appUser -- do I need this???

My test code that tries to create 2 users looks like this:

require "user"
local a = appUser:new{setLastName="Doe"}
local b = appUser:new{setLastName="Doe-Doe"}
print(a.getLastName())
print(b.getLastName())

When I run the test script from the commandline, this is what I get:

mydevbox:/usr/share/vsx/lib/testapp# lua testuser.lua
nil
nil
mydevbox:/usr/share/vsx/lib/testapp# 

What I've tried so Far:

  1. I've tried changing the way I call the methods from print(a.getLastName()) to print(a:getLastName())

  2. I've changed the variable definitions from:

    appUser._lname to _lname

so that my code look like this:

local _lname
function appUser:setLastName(lname)
    _lname = lname
end

function appUser:getLastName()
    return _lname
end

I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong. Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks.

EDIT 1

The following changes have been made to the code to test Etan's answer and mine: 1. I've changed the constructor to accept a parameter as noted in my answer... 2. I've added the reference to "self" in the body of the set/get functions.

-- This function creates a new instance of appUser
appUser = {}
appUser_mt = { __index = appUser }

function appUser:new(new_inst)
    new_inst = new_inst or {}    -- the new instance
    setmetatable( new_inst, appUser_mt)-- all instances share the same metatable.
    return new_inst
end
-- Here are some functions (methods) for appUser:
function appUser:setLastName(lname)
    self._lname = lname
end

function appUser:setFirstName(fname)
    self._fname = fname
end

function appUser:getLastName()
    return self._lname
end

function appUser:getFirstName()
    return self._fname
end

object A and B in the test script still fail with nil, but C works, because I'm not creating it the same way I instantiate a or b. (Please see my answer)

Edit 2

appUser = {}
appUser_mt = { __index = appUser }

function appUser:new()
    return setmetatable( {}, appUser_mt)-- all instances share the same metatable.   
end

local function validate_vmail(vmail_id)
    local success = true    
    if type(vmail_id) ~= 'string' then
        success = false
    end

    if not exists_in_database(vmail_id) then
        success = false

    end
    return success
end 

function appUser_mt.__index(t, k)
  if k == 'lastName' then
    return t._lastName
  end
  return rawget(t, k)
end


function appUser_mt.__newindex(t, k, v)
    local success = false
    if k == 'lastName' then
        k = '_lastName'
        v = v:gsub('^.', string.upper) -- Make sure the first letter is uppercase.
        success = true
    end
    if k == 'vmail_id' then     
        if validate_vmail(v) then
            v = v
            success = true
        else
            success = false
        end
    end
    if success then
        rawset(t, k, v)
    end 
end    
return appUser

And here's the client that instantiates this class:

local a = appUser:new()
a.lastName = "doe"
print(a.lastName)

local b = appUser:new()
b.lastName = "dylan"
print(b.lastName)

a.vmail_id = 1234
print(a.vmail_id)

The code seems to be working, but I'd like to make sure I understood your comments / answers thus far.

share|improve this question
    
a and b still don't work because you need to use appUser:new{_lname="Doe"} instead of appUser:new{setLastName="Doe"}. You need to predefine the fields that your methods assign to not predefine fields with the names of your methods. –  Etan Reisner Dec 31 '13 at 17:49
    
Etan, thanks for all the help so far btw. I understand your comment about setting the field, not the method. but technically, when doing OOP, the clients should not know the names of the internal variables used in my class.... Which is why I wanted to provide public methods to access and alter the value. Does that make sense? –  dot Dec 31 '13 at 18:41
    
Yes, I understood why you were doing what you were doing. My point was just that you can't do it as you have things written. You could transform from method names to field names (or better method calls) in the new functions table argument if you wanted to but that's not the code you have written. –  Etan Reisner Dec 31 '13 at 19:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Module

You're not assigning the result of require "user" anywhere, so I assume you might have a module call hidden away somewhere. You need return appUser if you intend to use it without calls to module, such as this:

-- mlib.lua
local M = {}
function M.add(a, b) return a + b end
return M

-- script.lua
local m = require'mlib'
print(m.add(2, 2))

Constructor

You can simplify your constructor function.

function appUser.new()
  return setmetatable({}, appUser_mt)
end

I think I understand your intention with the following code, but it's not going to work the way you want it to without a little tweaking. I'll come back to this.

local a = appUser:new{setLastName="Doe"}
local b = appUser:new{setLastName="Doe-Doe"}

Functions

Remember that any time you define a function with :, you're inserting an implicit self parameter as the first argument. The same goes for calling a function as well.

function t:f() end
function t.f(self) end
t.f = function(self) end

All of these lines are equivalent statements.

t['f'](t)
t.f(t)
t:f()

Setters / Getters

Setters and getters are not anywhere as needed as the case may be in other languages. There is no concept of private or public interface to tables in Lua, so if all you're doing is assignment and retrieval, your current setup could become a maintenance liability in the future. There is nothing wrong with doing the following.

local class = {}
class.lastName = 'Doe'

In fact, there are metamethod facilities such that you could intercept certain key assignments and perform operations on the values, if you really wanted setters but also wanted them to blend in with other properties. Let me give you an example.

local mt = {}
function mt.__index(t, k)
  if k == 'lastName' then
    return t._lastName
  end
end

function mt.__newindex(t, k, v)
  if k == 'lastName' then
    k = '_lastName'
    v = v:gsub('^.', string.upper) -- Make sure the first letter is uppercase.
  end

  rawset(t, k, v)
end

local class = setmetatable({}, mt)
class.lastName = 'smith'
print(class.lastName) -- Smith

Constructor, pt. 2

To break this down a little bit, let's look at the following statement.

local a = appUser:new{setLastName="Doe"}

The {setLastName = "Doe"} part is simply constructing a table with a key (or property) named setLastName with the value of "Doe", which are both strings. This is then used as the second argument to the new function of appUser. appUser is the first argument, used as the implicit self parameter mentioned earlier. Remember the :.

That is actually not necessary at all. It's enough to call and define appUser.new as a function without a self, since it doesn't need one. That's all there is to this. new is not yet special in any way that it would somehow know to call setLastName with the parameter "Doe", but we can make it that way.


With all that said, here's an idea of how you could get your constructors to work the way you want.

function appUser.new(options)
  return setmetatable(options or {}, appUser_mt)
end

local a = appUser.new{_lname = 'Doe'}
local b = appUser.new{_lname = 'Doe-Doe'}

However, if you actually wanted to call functions in the constructor table itself, then that requires a little more.

function appUser.new(options)
  local o = setmetatable({}, appUser_mt)

  for k, v in pairs(options)
    -- This will iterate through all the keys in options, using them as
    -- function names to call on the class with the values
    -- as the second argument.
    o[k](o, v)
  end

  return o
end

local a = appUser.new{setLastName = 'Doe'}
local b = appUser.new{setLastName = 'Doe-Doe'}

Please let me know if this has not yet answered your question as completely as possible.

share|improve this answer
    
Ryan, first off, thanks for the details! I appreciate your time. In your examples under the Setters/Getters section, I have the following questions. 1) What does the k='_lastName' assignment line do in the __newindex() method? 2)if i understand your comments / examples correctly, all properties that I want my user class to have then should be defined in the __index() and __newindex() methods. is this correct? What about class methods? Like a "deleteuser()" method or a "addwidget()" method? –  dot Dec 31 '13 at 19:29
1  
1) k = '_lastName' redirects the rawset to _lastName instead of setting the value on lastName. This is required because __newindex and __index only operate on non-existent keys. So, for example, if foo.bar is already set to 3, then foo's metatable __newindex would never react for any further assignment/retrieval to the bar property. 2) Only the properties that you need to affect any change upon. This idea of separating interface from implementation isn't very strongly encouraged in vanilla Lua. In fact, all of your functions are sharing the same space as your variables. –  Ryan Stein Dec 31 '13 at 19:44
    
Please see my Edit 2 for an example of how I think I should be setting /getting values and validating values –  dot Dec 31 '13 at 19:45
    
+1 for the comment that lua doesn't really support the separation of interface from implementation. I seem to be having a hard time wrapping my head around doing OOP in lua ... maybe that's why... –  dot Dec 31 '13 at 19:51
    
My apologies. The rawget in __index is entirely unnecessary. That aside, it seems like what you're doing as far as OOP may be a little overblown for Lua. It feels more like C++, honestly. Have you read through Programming in Lua? Chapters 11 and 16 might be useful in helping you understand how tables are used in Lua. There's also the OOP page on the users wiki. In closing, I'll say that the simplest solution's probably best. –  Ryan Stein Dec 31 '13 at 20:09

The way I was instantiating the objects is failing...

require "user"
local a = appUser:new{setLastName="Doe"}
local b = appUser:new{setLastName="Doe-Doe"}
print(a:getLastName())
print(b:getLastName())


local c = appUser:new()
c:setLastName("Dylan")
print(c:getLastName())

The results for object "c" show up correctly...

So I guess the problem is with my constructor. i've tried changing it to:

function appUser:new(new_inst)
    new_inst = new_inst or {}    -- the new instance
    setmetatable( new_inst, appUser_mt)-- all instances share the same metatable.
    return new_inst
end

But that hasn't fixed object a or b yet, but I am getting proper results for c

share|improve this answer
    
Correct. See my edit to my answer. –  Etan Reisner Dec 31 '13 at 16:53
    
You c object "works" because you are calling the setLastName function. However, after creating the a, b and c objects just like you have try calling print(a:getLastName()) or print(b.getLastName()) and see what you get and you'll see what I was getting at with self versus the appUser "class" itself (or a scoped local) in the function body. –  Etan Reisner Dec 31 '13 at 17:21
    
Etan, if I understood your last comment, you are asking me to try calling the getLastName() method... which I am doing for object "c". And it's working. –  dot Dec 31 '13 at 18:26
    
Yes. I'm suggesting you try that on object "a" or "b" after you create all three in the same file and see what you get for all of them. Create a as above, create b as above, create c as above, call getLastName for c as above, call getLastName for a, call getLastName for b. –  Etan Reisner Dec 31 '13 at 19:34

That changed code looks like it should work correctly however it, like the original, has the problem that it will only ever support a single lname or fname for all appuser instances. You need to use the automagic self variable in your defined functions so that they operate on the passed in instance correctly.

function appUser:setLastName(lname)
    self._lname = lname
end

function appUser:getLastName()
    return self._lname
end

Also this code is not doing what you think it does (and what you want it to do).

local a = appUser:new{setLastName="Doe"}
local b = appUser:new{setLastName="Doe-Doe"}

It is not calling the setLastName function on your new appUser instance. You are creating a table (the {...}), giving that table a setLastName key with the given value Doe or Doe-Doe, and then passing that table to the appUser:new function (which then prompty ignores it as it takes no arguments).

share|improve this answer
    
I *believe" that i don't need to explicitly reference self, because I'm using the ":" notation in the function definition. I could be wrong... I'm just learning. But please see the answer I just posted. –  dot Dec 31 '13 at 16:53
    
The : notation for function creation means you don't need self in the function arguments. That's the automagic part. You still need self in the body of the function when you want to reference the "calling" object. –  Etan Reisner Dec 31 '13 at 16:54
    
Etan, can you explain then why my "c" object currently works, without the reference to self in the function body? thanks. By the way, you check check out Edit 1 in my post. I've tried your suggestion to add "self" to the body but it doesn't work. –  dot Dec 31 '13 at 16:56

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