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I've decimal value 18.8. Values that are stored in this variable can be of any kind. For example it can be 1.0000000 or 1.00004000 or 5.00000008. I would like to write a method so that i can pass decimal to it and get rounded up string. This wouldn't be a problem if i would know decimal places i would like to get. But what i would like to get is:

When it's 1.0000000 it should return 1.
If it's 1.00004000 it should return 1.00004.
When it's 5.00000008 it should return 5.00000008. So basically it should find all 0 that are behind last digit diffrent then 0 and cut it off.

How should i aproach it? What's the best method? I'm getting this value from SQL and put it in decimal variable but then i would like to display it and having 5.0000000 when it could be displayed as 5 is a bit overkill for me.

Hope I could get some nice suggestions.

With regards,

MadBoy

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4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

AFAIK, ToString( "0.##" ) will do, just increase number of # so that your value won't round up. E.g.:

decimal d = 1.999m;
string dStr = d.ToString("0.###");

This will generate "1,999" string (delimiter depends upon used culture).

As a result, you can use common very long formatting string: "0.############################" - to format all your values.

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I don't know amount of decimal places i need. This would work if i would know that i want to cut it off after 3 digits or more. But i want to cut it off only if all digits are zeros after the last non zero. –  MadBoy Jan 18 '10 at 13:06
1  
If you have 1.00004000, then after ToString("0.####################") you'll have "1.00004". Speaking of MAX of # signs: it is 28. Decimal allows maximum of 28-29 of significant digits. This makes 1 for leading zero and 28 for other signs. Even if you have smth like 15555.98900008900 it will be ok. –  terR0Q Jan 18 '10 at 13:13
    
Thanks, it works. I should have tested it before doubting it will work as you said it would. –  MadBoy Jan 18 '10 at 13:22

So trim the zeroes from the end.

decimal d = 1.999m;
string dStr = d.ToString().TrimEnd('0').TrimEnd('.');
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And if there's a value 1,000,000.00? Then he loses all zero's I suppose? Or there remains "1,000,000." –  Webleeuw Jan 18 '10 at 13:10
1  
He loses only the zeroes after the dot (.) There remains the dot, but he could just add another TrimEnd('.'). For I18N, he should not use the dot, but the culture specific separator. –  Scoregraphic Jan 18 '10 at 13:16

You can also use string.Format and here's the documentation of the different possible formats but I like Johan Sheehans cheat sheet more as a quick reference.

decimal number=4711.00004711m;
4711.00004711
string.Format("{0:0.#############}",number);
"4711,00004711"
number=42;
42
string.Format("{0:0.#############}",number);
"42"
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Take a look at Jon Skeets article: http://www.yoda.arachsys.com/csharp/floatingpoint.html

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How is an article discussing binary floating point relevant to the decimal type that the question asks about? –  LukeH Jan 18 '10 at 13:16

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