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Is there a substantial overhead when connect to a database by the domain name instead of the IP Address, over a local network?

I have an application server that is will be connecting to a mongodb server running on a separate instance, but the same local network. Is there substantial overhead for the DNS lookup?

For example:

[ app ] -- 1.1.1.1:27017 --> [ Mongo ]

VS

[ app ] -- mongo.example.com:27017 --> [ Mongo ]

EDIT

Is it generally considered a best practice to use the IP Address instead of the Domain name?

More info:

Thank you!

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1  
Seems like overoptimization to worry about this unless you are connecting to thousands of database servers with short-lived connections. And even that is potentially fine. – loganfsmyth Dec 31 '13 at 20:26
    
Thanks, @loganfsmyth that's good to know. cHao's answer help improve my understanding of the DNS process -- in my mind the DNS look up would occur a lot more often then it actually does. – Kyle Finley Dec 31 '13 at 20:35
up vote 2 down vote accepted

There will be an occasional, possibly significant, delay to look up the name. But the result will then be cached on any decent OS, so most connections won't have to wait on a DNS lookup.

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The DNS server will say how long a particular record should be considered valid. As long as you're not doing an outrageous number of DNS lookups, the result will generally be cached until the TTL expires (unless the name server isn't responding when the value needs to be refreshed, in which case other numbers factor in). – cHao Dec 31 '13 at 20:23

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