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My program only sometimes gets a Segmentation fault: 11 and I can't figure it out for the life of me. I don't know a whole lot in the realm of C++ and pointers, so what kinds of things should I be looking for?
I know it might have to do with some function pointers I'm using.

My question is what kinds of things produce Segmentation faults? I'm desperately lost on this and I have looked through all the code I thought could cause this.

The debugger I'm using is lldb and it shows the error being in this code segment:

void Player::update() {
    // if there is a smooth animation waiting, do this one
    if (queue_animation != NULL) {
        // once current animation is done,
        // switch it with the queue animation and make the queue NULL again
        if (current_animation->Finished()) {
            current_animation = queue_animation;
            queue_animation = NULL;
        }
    }
    current_animation->update(); // <-- debug says program halts on this line
    game_object::update();
}

current_animation and queue_animation are both pointers of class Animation.
Also to note, within Animation::update() is a function pointer that gets passed to Animation in the constructor.

If you need to see all of the code, it's over here.

EDIT:

I changed the code to use a bool:

void Player::update() {
    // if there is a smooth animation waiting, do this one
    if (is_queue_animation) {
        // once current animation is done,
        // switch it with the queue animation and make the queue NULL again
        if (current_animation->Finished()) {
            current_animation = queue_animation;
            is_queue_animation = false;
        }
    }
    current_animation->update();
    game_object::update();
}

It didn't help anything because I still sometimes get a Segmentation fault.

EDIT 2:

Modified code to this:

void Player::update() {
    // if there is a smooth animation waiting, do this one
    if (is_queue_animation) {
        std::cout << "queue" << std::endl;
        // once current animation is done,
        // switch it with the queue animation and make the queue NULL again
        if (current_animation->Finished()) {
            if (queue_animation != NULL) // make sure this is never NULL
                current_animation = queue_animation;
            is_queue_animation = false;
        }
    }
    current_animation->update();
    game_object::update();
}

Just to see when this function would output without any user input. Every time I got a Segmentation fault this would output twice right before the fault. This is my debug output:

* thread #1: tid = 0x1421bd4, 0x0000000000000000, queue = 'com.apple.main-thread, stop reason = EXC_BAD_ACCESS (code=1, address=0x0) frame #0: 0x0000000000000000 error: memory read failed for 0x0

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May be Memory corruption? can you try in debugger and give us precise code to look in to –  Digital_Reality Jan 1 at 3:07
    
Look for pointers that haven't been allocated, or traditional arrays that have been overwritten. Segmentation fault usually means your program wrote in some memory that didn't belong to it. –  lurker Jan 1 at 3:11
2  
On the one hand you state that you "found the exact line the program is stopping on", and on the other hand you say, "I'm not even sure which file contains the faulty line of code". Which is it? If you know the line which is causing the problem, then please post the relevant code here. –  JBentley Jan 1 at 3:19
2  
Please post the code which your debugger identified as the problem - otherwise your question is unanswerable. Please also edit your question so that it doesn't contain a contradiction. –  JBentley Jan 1 at 3:24
2  
' It's because the first time I've ever programmed in C++ was about two weeks ago." - there's your problem! :) –  Mitch Wheat Jan 1 at 3:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Some causes of segmentation fault:

  1. You dereference a pointer that is uninitialized or that points to NULL
  2. You dereference a deleted pointer
  3. You write outside the bounds of the scope of allocated memory (e.g. after the last element of an array)
share|improve this answer
    
Sadly it's not any of those things. –  yentup Jan 1 at 5:31
    
The source of all my problems was an uninitialized pointer! Thanks for updating your answer. –  yentup Jan 1 at 5:46

Run valgrind with your software (warning, it really slows things down). Its likely that memory has been overwritten in some way. Valgrind (and other tools) can help track down some of these kinds of issues, but not everything.

If its a large program, this could get very difficult as everything is suspect since anything can corrupt anything in memory. You might try to minimize the code paths run by limiting the program in some way and see if you can make the problem happen. This can help reduce the amount of suspect code.

If you have a previous version of the code that didn't have the problem, see if you can revert back to that and then look to see what changed. If you are using git, it has a way to bisect search into the revision where a failure first occurred.

Warning, this kind of thing is the bane of C/C++ developers, which is one of the reason that languages such as Java are "safer".

You might just start looking through the code and see if you can find things that look suspicious, including possible race conditions. Hopefully this won't take to much time. I don't want to freak you out, but these kinds of bugs can be some of the most difficult to track down.

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