Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a Class that I wish to implement as Singleton.

I wish that the only way an Instance of this class may be created / accessed is via:

+(MYClass*)sharedInstance 

method. alloc and init are called within the method implementation (of course).

Is there a way to block the usage of alloc and init, or to make them 'empty', if there's an attempt to create an instance of that class NOT via the sharedInstance method (but through alloc + init directly)?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

Putting this code in your header file should produce a compile time error if init is called outside the implementation:

- (id)init __attribute__((unavailable("cannot use init for this class, use +(MYClass*)sharedInstance instead")));

I found this technique here.

Update:

You won't be able to write [[MYClass alloc] init] in your .m file but you can use the following:

+ (MYClass *)sharedInstance {
    static MYClass *sharedInstance;
    static dispatch_once_t onceToken;
    dispatch_once(&onceToken, ^{
        sharedInstance = [self new];
    });
    return sharedInstance;
}
share|improve this answer
    
nice... thanks! –  Ohad Regev Jan 2 at 9:02
    
wait a minute... if I do that, I block the ability to alloc and init the Singleton Instance within the sharedInstance method... Is there a way to either define this statement only externally to the class or add an exception to the exception so I can still use them in the .m file? –  Ohad Regev Jan 2 at 9:11
    
You're right, I have updated my answer, I hope that helps –  Keith Kennedy Jan 2 at 9:37
    
That works... a bit of an overkill, but it does the work. You are good, man... But if I try to do the same thing for 'alloc' as well (use the unavailable thing), I get an error. any idea what to do there? –  Ohad Regev Jan 2 at 9:45
    
If you are stopping alloc using something like this in the .h: + (id)alloc __attribute__((unavailable("no alloc"))); then, you could change the sharedInstance line in my answer to sharedInstance = [self new], I'll update my answer so it does stop the use of alloc and init like you asked. –  Keith Kennedy Jan 2 at 9:50
add comment

If you are using arc, add compiler flag -fno-objc-arc to the file.

"alloc + init" will call sharedManager method.

static MyGizmoClass *sharedGizmoManager = nil;

+ (MyGizmoClass*)sharedManager
{
    if (sharedGizmoManager == nil) {
        sharedGizmoManager = [[super allocWithZone:NULL] init];
    }
    return sharedGizmoManager;
}

+ (id)allocWithZone:(NSZone *)zone
{
    return [[self sharedManager] retain];
}

- (id)copyWithZone:(NSZone *)zone
{
    return self;
}

- (id)retain
{
    return self;
}

- (NSUInteger)retainCount
{
    return NSUIntegerMax;  //denotes an object that cannot be released
}

- (void)release
{
    //do nothing
}

- (id)autorelease
{
    return self;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Just note that this will not compile if you use ARC. –  Martin R Jan 1 at 9:38
    
@MartinR I have edited it. –  KudoCC Jan 1 at 9:41
    
This will most likely cause strange behavior if you have an -init method, since [[MyGizmoClass alloc] init] will call the initializer of your already instantiated singleton again. Better throw an exception in +allocWithZone: instead to let the programmer know that he should use the singleton accessor instead. –  Fönsi Jan 1 at 10:08
    
@Fönsi I agree with you, but it is ok when -init method doesn't do any significant thing. –  KudoCC Jan 1 at 10:18
    
@Fönsi There is a solution that using dispatch_once in init to make sure the instance in init method initial only once. –  KudoCC Jan 1 at 10:53
show 1 more comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.