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OK, I don't do much .Net programming, but I do have one that I maintain, so the answer to this may be obvious.

Setup:

  • Windows 7 Ultimate with All Language Packs Installed
  • Visual Studio 2008 Winforms VB.Net project.

I'm in the process of localizing this project, and when I'm making the Japanese version of the forms, the characters display as squares, though they render in my browser correctly. I'm guessing that this is because the default font does not have a glyph for those characters.

So, my questions:

Are winforms UTF-8, or some other character encoding? Is there a way to change the character encoding? Should I change the font for the Japanese forms, or will Windows do it? What's the general best practice here?

I want to know that I am copying the characters correctly into my forms, and I want to be able to test them. How can I do this?

Thanks for any feedback!

EDIT: Thanks for the info! Here's what I've found.

Arial Unicode MS does have all the glyphs, but I wasn't using it, because it wasn't in the VS2008 list of fonts. I manually edited the font box to use it, but then Visual Studio throws the message, "Attempted to read or write protected memory. This is often an indication that other memory has been corrupted." I'm guessing that's because VS doesn't have permission to access that font for some reason. I go back to the default font, scary error message goes away.

Then, even when using Arial Unicode MS, the text renders as blocks in the forms titles. Same text renders correctly in labels.

So, I think I want to use the default font, and let Windows handle it. I think I've read that everything from XP on will handle it. Windows 2000 won't, which is a shame, but what ever, I don't know what font I should use, and whatever font it is was excluded from VS. I don't know how to add it without getting lots of error messages about protected memory.

Now the problem is, resizing the labels in the form, since the translated text is often larger.

Also, I don't have a support team to do this for me, but I could maybe install extra copies of Windows 7, and change to the Japanese language pack and try to run it. But that becomes a major pain. I thought I read that you could change the language while the application is running, but that doesn't seem to be true. MS docs talk about how to do this, but Windows 7 also tells you that you have to log out to change the language.

MS Gothic seems to work, and it's part of VS 2008, but the title bar is still squares. That's really odd, since the same glyphs are in the winform. Is that because title bar fonts are set at a system level, and not the application level?

Sorry for being wordy. Not sure that there is even a question here. Just trying to get it all out, so maybe this will help someone else down the line.

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The font for window title bars is set in the Control Panel Display applet. Again, this will not be set to a font that can't render Japanese glyphs on a Japanese version of Windows. –  Hans Passant Jan 20 '10 at 14:13
    
Gah! Buggy font support is one of the reasons I use an iMac at home for the Japanese in my family. Seamless language switching makes everything easy. Unfortunately, this doesn't really help your dev problem. –  Armstrongest Apr 9 '10 at 14:37
    
I am using Seogui that microsoft recommends thats why there are squares but changing to Arial does the magic –  Moons Jan 15 '13 at 12:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Any .NET code, including Windows Forms, uses Unicode encoded as UTF16. Your problem isn't likely to be an encoding issue, that produces question marks instead of squares. Getting a square indicates you are using a font that is missing the required glyph to display the Japanese character.

The Arial Unicode MS font is available on a machine that has Office installed, it is a very complete font. Use the charmap.exe applet to find out what glyphs are supported by other fonts.

Note that this font problem isn't likely to be an issue when your program runs on a Japanese version of Windows. You can get specific language versions of Windows through an MSDN subscription. At least get one for your QA staff so they can verify that everything works correctly.

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Is Arial Unicode available on all language versions of Windows 7? Also do you know what happens if you select a font at design time that isn't available at runtime? Does the Windows/.NET runtime automatically select a replacement font? –  MarkJ Jan 19 '10 at 9:05
    
Yes. The Windows font mapper chooses a substitute font, Segoe UI on English Win7. Probably not on Japanese. Don't send out software you haven't tested. –  Hans Passant Jan 19 '10 at 10:05
    
Arial Unicode MS is not in the Microsoft list of fonts supplied with Windows 7? microsoft.com/typography/Fonts/product.aspx?PID=161 –  MarkJ Jan 19 '10 at 17:50
    
You're right, Office I guess. Use charmap.exe to find one. –  Hans Passant Jan 19 '10 at 18:29
    
Thanks for the info! Here's what I've found. Arial Unicode MS does have all the glyphs, but I wasn't using it, because it wasn't in the VS2008 list of fonts. When I use it, VS throws the message, Attempted to read or write protected memory. This is often an indication that other memory has been corrupted." I'm guessing that's because VS doesn't have permission to access that font for some reason. I go back to the default font, and all is good. Going to edit original message, because I'm out of space here... –  Michael Jan 20 '10 at 13:52

Here's a great read on your issues from Joel Spolsky.

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This is an issue more about fonts & operating systems. Although the general subject of unicode is related, this (classic Spolsky) article isn't going to help much here. –  PandaWood Apr 7 '12 at 0:12

Just to be clear, did you install the language support: Control Panel / Regional Options / Display Languages. Presumably you've got Japanese text in the source code. You're saving the source code as some sort of Unicode, right?

For 3 years I've maintained a Japanese forms-based app (www.jbrute.com) which migrated from MFC, to WinForms to WPF across US English versions of XP, Vista and Win7. It displays Kanji, Kana and Uses the IME. No grief whatsoever.

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