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I have been using the OpenCV random forest code for a few months to create a predictor. The method seems to generate a predictor with ~95% accuracy. Often times, the predictor file (output as either an XML/YAML file) can be well over 100 MB in size depending on the number of trees (ntree) and the maximum tree depth (max_depth) requested. Thus, I wanted to dig deeper and understand the (binary) decision tree structure output to see if I can extract only the relevant parts of the XML file necessary for the predictor.

For simplicity, I created a predictor with a max_depth = 1 (maximum tree depth) and ntree = 1 (total number of trees) which resulted in a tree (in XML format) that is as follows:

<nodes>
  <_>
    <depth>0</depth>
    <sample_count>115440</sample_count>
    <value>1.</value>
    <norm_class_idx>0</norm_class_idx>
    <Tn>0</Tn>
    <complexity>0</complexity>
    <alpha>0.</alpha>
    <node_risk>68228.</node_risk>
    <tree_risk>0.</tree_risk>
    <tree_error>0.</tree_error>
    <splits>
      <_>
        <var>7</var>
        <quality>5.9345382812500000e+04</quality>
        <le>5.5670547485351562e+00</le>
      </_>
    </splits>
  </_>
  <_>
    <depth>1</depth>
    <sample_count>37651</sample_count>
    <value>3.</value>
    <norm_class_idx>2</norm_class_idx>
    <Tn>0</Tn>
    <complexity>0</complexity>
    <alpha>0.</alpha>
    <node_risk>6267.</node_risk>
    <tree_risk>0.</tree_risk>
    <tree_error>0.</tree_error>
  </_>
  <_>
    <depth>1</depth>
    <sample_count>77789</sample_count>
    <value>1.</value>
    <norm_class_idx>0</norm_class_idx>
    <Tn>0</Tn>
    <complexity>0</complexity>
    <alpha>0.</alpha>
    <node_risk>35917.</node_risk>
    <tree_risk>0.</tree_risk>
    <tree_error>0.</tree_error>
  </_>
</nodes>

From what I've gathered from Google (there isn't much!), I should be focusing on "var" which is the feature column that resulted in the best split of the data and "le" which is the "less than" splitting value. However, when I manually (using an AWK one-liner) split my data accordingly, I don't get the same resulting "sample_count":

awk 'BEGIN{FS=","; LEFT=0; RIGHT=0;} {if ($8 < 5.5670547485351562){LEFT=LEFT+1} else{RIGHT=RIGHT+1}} END{print "Left = ", LEFT, "Right = ", RIGHT}' Features.cs
#Note that we compare $8 for the 7th variable since the first column is zero in OpenCV

The result from AWK is:

Left = 42087 Right = 73353

But, according to the tree, I should be getting Left = 37651 and Right = 77789. Both values add up to the total number of "sample_count" = 115440. In addition, I don't have any missing data so surrogate splits shouldn't matter. Unfortunately, the documentation on how to interpret this XML tree is severely lacking so any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Again, the goal is to:

i) understand the how to recreate the tree structure

ii) extract only the essential parts of the tree in order to reduce the file size

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