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Can anyone explain me why this is true:

char *p;
short  i;
long l;

(long *) p = &l ;       /* Legal cast   */
(long) i = l ;          /* Illegal cast */

I know it has something to do with lvalue and rvalue but shouldn't (long *) p be a rvalue?

edit:

sorry it seems I confused myself and others, I asked this while reading "this MDSN" and I was surprised to see this syntax, I see it's a special feature that allows to convert lvalue into lvalue as long as it's the same size.

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1  
Neither are valid C++, and this shouldn't compile. The result of either cast is an rvalue to which you cannot assign. –  Kerrek SB Jan 1 '14 at 17:21
2  
Neither of these compile for me. –  Joseph Mansfield Jan 1 '14 at 17:21
    
Well, I don't see how (1) is legal. According to my clang++, it's not. They both are erroneous. –  user529758 Jan 1 '14 at 17:21
    
Regarding the edit: That's just plain weird. If the two types have the same size, then why not just say p = (char *) &l? –  Kerrek SB Jan 2 '14 at 11:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Neither of these expressions are legal, they should both fail to compile.

C++11, 5.17.1:

The assignment operator (=) and the compound assignment operators all group right-to-left. All require a modifiable lvalue as their left operand and return an lvalue referring to the left operand.

5.4:

Explicit type conversion (cast notation) [expr.cast] 1 The result of the expression (T) cast-expression is of type T. The result is an lvalue if T is an lvalue reference type or an rvalue reference to function type and an xvalue if T is an rvalue reference to object type; otherwise the result is a prvalue.

So both expressions violate these constraints.

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see the edit please –  Vladp Jan 2 '14 at 10:08

shouldn't (long *) p be a rvalue?

It is.

They're both prvalues and, as such, both statements are ill-formed:

[C++03: 5.4/1]: The result of the expression (T) cast-expression is of type T. The result is an lvalue if T is a reference type, otherwise the result is an rvalue.

[C++11: 5.4/1]: The result of the expression (T) cast-expression is of type T. The result is an lvalue if T is an lvalue reference type or an rvalue reference to function type and an xvalue if T is an rvalue reference to object type; otherwise the result is a prvalue. [..]

GCC 4.8 rejects your "legal cast", but Visual Studio has an extension that accepts this (for no apparent reason).

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see the edit please –  Vladp Jan 2 '14 at 10:08
    
@Vladp: There :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 2 '14 at 16:22

The result of a value conversion is an rvalue. You cannot assign to rvalues of fundamental types.

In other words, for int a = 10;, a is an lvalue of type int, but (long) a is a temporary rvalue of type long, and you cannot assign to the temporary. Likewise for pointers.

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see the edit please –  Vladp Jan 2 '14 at 10:09

Why do you think your cast is legal? I'm getting error C2106: '=' : left operand must be l-value on both casts.

This shouldn't be legal. If you really want to do it, you have to cast it like this:

(long*&)p = &l; // equivalent to *(long**)&p = &l

But don't do that unless you know what you are doing.

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1  
When you know what you are doing, you don't do that. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 1 '14 at 17:26

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