Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
public class KV<K, V> {
    public K key;
    public V value;
    public KV(K key, V value) {
        this.key = key;
        this.value = value;
    } 
}

I try to refactor the class variable "value" which happens on place, that means no dialog that pops up, presses enter and it tries to refactor across the entire project including comments and what not, including:

<%--<link href="<c:url value="../core/core.css" />" />--%>

in a .jsp file. That is way too "clever" to try to refactor comments that matches across the entire project. This often causes lots of bug risks and refactoring in a Java environment is no longer safe.

The same thing was occurring in Intellij 12. Seriously, but I don't need intellij to recommend anything that is considered unsafe, or when it is not sure it is the same thing! I can exclude the refactorings, but I don't have time to evaluate five "suggestions" everytime. It just raises the bar for human errors, and most of the time I just press enter, and woops things are refactored.

Refactoring is also a major issue in a JAVA ENVIRONMENT when it sometimes tries to replace things in .js files. Seriously, but this has to stop.

Without the popup dialog I can't uncheck "search strings", and even if that was checked, intellij should NEVER include the suggestions by default, specially when it is outside of the current file. It can recommend to refactor them as well, but they should be excluded by default. That is, an opt in feature, rather than a by default destroy everything.

This is a serious user ability problem with more recent so called "smart" intellij refactoring. When refactoring JS files, I don't want to search Java files, for comments or strings! Period! And vice versa!

Safety comes first! Developers that know what they are doing will search for strings themselves if needed. In a dynamic environment it makes intellij impossible to use, because frequently, and without any clear pattern, sometimes refactorings go through, sometimes it changes things across the project and what not.

There should be an option that says, "refactor only relative to this file or when 100% inferred!", especially for dynamic languages! For static languages it shouldn't even attempt to look for comments and strings outside the file.

I didn't mean to put it out in public, but I have raised this issue over 2 years ago in the bugtracker, but no body payed any attention.

EDIT

For those of you that think that I might be going to far, I just tried this out:

With this class:

public class KV<K, V> {
    public K key;
    public V val;
    public KV(K key, V val) {
        this.key = key;
        this.val = val;
    }
}

And adding this to any Java class, for instance:

public class CoreConfig {
    String abc = "kv.val";
    String def = "somethingElse.val";
}

And refactoring KV.val as before, I get the following recommendations, an ENTER from disaster and something I have to evaluate and exclude one at a time. It takes effort and is just annoying and risky. It's like someone yelling out, STOP! And then ooh, nothing after a minute, frustration and a 1000 long word essay ( this ).

enter image description here

Seriously, is there a way to disable this kind of risky behaviour!? And is there any reason why this is on by default??

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

When you press Shift + F6 twice, it opens the dialog and you can disable "Search in comments and strings"

share|improve this answer
2  
To be clear that is activating the shortcut for "Refactor Rename" TWICE. It may be a different combination depending upon your keymapping. –  Kris Erickson Jan 1 at 18:02
    
Thanks, I saw that you can disable the inplace refactor as well, although it is nice, because that always feels like the safe one. The main point of my post was to highlight that the search for comments and strings should be turned off globally. It makes no sense that it tries to alter a value in a variable in a another class. It is not smart. There is a problem when intelligence or AI assumes that by increasing the likelyhood for being correct, it somehow is allowed to have a margin of error. I want strict java refactorings, that should include XML files unless the entire package name exist –  SecretService Jan 2 at 11:32
    
But since it remembers the settings, I see no problem with it. You can use that full text refactoring or not, depending on what you need. –  Meo Jan 2 at 13:22
add comment

And is there any reason why this is on by default??

Yes, there is. People tend to use way too many DSLs, templates and language injections these days. In plain old Java all these things mainly exist as Strings. Reflection API also represents method/class name as a String. It is not possible for any IDE to support and recognize them all, so it does it's best to provide you with a safety net against possible refactoring mistakes. If you have an excellent unit test coverage, though, then you're probably safe here.

As for comments, they often contain code samples. These code chunks become obsolete quickly during renamings, so it's helpful when IDE reminds you about their existence.

This check, of course, results in false positives sometimes. However, if you're giving your variables descriptive self-explanatory names (I mean not "var" or "val"), this is unlikely to happen. So, IDE is pushing you towards a better code style in some way.

If you're still not convinced, then follow an advice by @Meo and disable the search in strings and comments.

share|improve this answer
1  
Yeah, it is a good suggestion. But as I commented on his, there is a problem when intelligence or AI assumes that by increasing the likelyhood for being correct, it somehow is allowed to have a margin of error. I want strict java refactorings, that should include XML files unless the entire package name exist, and even then, I want to be notified. The refactor results should not list comments and strings first and should exclude by default. It has become less user friendly, and requires my focus which forces me to lean forward and strains my eyes. –  SecretService Jan 2 at 11:35
    
It is like trying to take down a crammed phone number. Can you repeat this number: 392314213343234295423442 ? For me it is the same kind of effort, and surely for many others. I hope the Intellij guys picks up and gives us the option to turn this off. –  SecretService Jan 2 at 11:37
1  
"If you have an excellent unit test coverage, though, then you're probably safe here" - that is not an excuse to provide us with an IDEA that treats Java as a dynamic language. If I wanted a dynamic language I would code in Groovy. "If you're giving your variables descriptive self-explanatory names (I mean not "var" or "val")" - The risk of collision still exists though. Just give us a "Strict" Java mode/option, like Eclipse and Intellij used to offer. –  SecretService Jan 2 at 11:41
    
Then you must really hate(as I do) how the in-editor unused declaration inspection works, it actually does not work if the name of the field or method(or property name in case of property accessors) is contained anywhere in 10 different files... and unlike the rename, it is actually not possible to reconfigure - IDEA-117906 –  Meo Jan 2 at 15:58
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.